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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3301-3325 out of 3465.

<< < 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 > >>

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
Exposure to pig farms and manure fertilizers associated with MRSA infections
For the first time researchers have found an association between living in proximity to high-density livestock production and community-acquired infections with MRSA. Their analysis concluded that approximately 11 percent of community-acquired MRSA and soft tissue infections in the study population could be attributed to crop fields fertilized with swine manure. The study is the first to examine the association between high-density livestock operations and manure-applied crop fields and MRSA infections in the community.
New York University-Geisinger Seed Grant Program, Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Tim Parsons
tmparson@jhsph.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 16-Sep-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Researchers identify a metabolite as a biomarker of diabetes risk
In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Robert Gerszten and colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital identify the metabolite 2-aminoadipic acid as a biomarker for T2D diabetes risk.
National Institutes of Health, Leducq Foundation, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, American Heart Association

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 15-Sep-2013
Nature Methods
'Wildly heterogeneous genes'
Cancer tumors almost never share the exact same genetic mutations, a fact that has confounded scientific efforts to better categorize cancer types and develop more targeted, effective treatments. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego propose a new approach called network-based stratification, which identifies cancer subtypes not by the singular mutations of individual patients, but by how those mutations affect shared genetic networks or systems.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 13-Sep-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Pinpointing molecular path that makes antidepressants act quicker in mouse model
The reasons behind why it often takes people several weeks to feel the effect of newly prescribed antidepressants remains somewhat of a mystery -- and likely, a frustration to both patients and physicians. How an antidepressant works on the biochemistry and behavior in mice lets researchers tease out the relative influence of two brain proteins on the pharmacology of an antidepressant. They found increased nerve-cell generation in the hippocampus and a quicker response to the antidepressant.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Cooperative Drug Discovery Group for the Treatment of Mood Disorders

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Sep-2013
Nature Reviews Immunology
Fish skin immune responses resemble those of the gut, Penn study finds
A study led by J. Oriol Sunyer's group at the University of Pennsylvania found that, not only does fish skin resemble the gut morphologically, but key components of skin immune responses are also akin to those of the gut.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
New grants fund LA BioMed research into obesity causes
While much of the obesity prevention efforts focus on diet and exercise, LA BioMed researchers are going even further back in time to explore what happens during development in the womb that could lead to overeating and obesity later in life.
National Institutes of Health, American Diabetes Association

Contact: Laura Mecoy
lmecoy@labiomed.org
310-546-5860
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed)

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
Contraception
Revised Medicaid policy could reduce unintended pregnancies, save millions in health costs
A revised Medicaid sterilization policy that removes logistical barriers, including a mandatory 30-day waiting period, could potentially honor women's reproductive decisions, reduce the number of unintended pregnancies and save $215 million in public health costs each year, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Their findings support growing evidence for the need to revisit a national policy that disproportionately affects low-income and minority women at high risk for unintended pregnancies.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Andrea Stanford
stanfordac@upmc.edu
412-522-3349
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
JAMA
Medicare Center of Excellence Policy may limit minority access to weight-loss surgery
New research indicates a decline in the number of minority patients with Medicare receiving bariatric surgery after the Medicare Center of Excellence Policy was implemented.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Contact: Natalie Wood-Wright
nwoodwri@jhsph.edu
443-703-8851
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
Cell Reports
Scripps Florida scientists pinpoint proteins vital to long-term memory
Scientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute have found a group of proteins essential to the formation of long-term memories. The proteins send signals from the outside to the inside of a cell, inducing a cellular response crucial for many aspects of embryonic development, including stem cell differentiation, as well as for normal functioning of the adult brain.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
New book from Harry P. Selker, M.D., M.S.P.H., offers fresh perspective on Affordable Care Act debate
A researcher's voice of reason entered the national debate on "Obamacare" today when Springer Science+Business Media released "The Affordable Care Act as a National Experiment: Health Policy Innovations and Lessons," edited by Harry P. Selker, M.D., M.S.P.H., and June S. Wasser, M.A. The book's fresh perspective asserts that health policy innovation is translational research directed at improving the public's health.
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Amy West
awest@tuftsmedicalcenter.org
617-636-6025
Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
Cell Reports
Study suggests antioxidant treatment may help NF1-linked behavioral issues
New research in mouse models suggests that treatment with antioxidants may help reduce behavioral issues linked to the genetic nervous system disorder Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and an associated condition called Costello syndrome. Scientists report their findings Sept. 12 in Cell Reports. The authors show that defects in the NF1/Ras molecular pathway, which cause the disorders, trigger production of harmful oxidative nitric oxide molecules in the oligodendrocyte glial brain cells of mice.
National Institutes of Health, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, DAMD Program Neurofibromatosis

Contact: Nick Miller
nicholas.miller@cchmc.org
513-803-6035
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
American Heart Association High Blood Pressure Research Scientific Sessions 2013
Simple steps may identify patients that hold onto excess sodium
Getting a second urine sample and blood pressure measure as patients head out of the doctor's office appears an efficient way to identify those whose health may be in jeopardy because their bodies hold onto too much sodium, researchers report.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics
Tracking criminal movement using math
In a paper published last month in the SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, authors Sorathan Chaturapruek, Jonah Breslau, Daniel Yazdi, Theodore Kolokolnikov, and Scott McCalla propose a mathematical model that analyzes criminal movement in terms of a LÚvy flight, a pattern in which criminals tend to move locally as well as in large leaps to other areas.
National Institutes of Health, DMS, Army Research Office, AARMS CRG, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Harvey Mudd College, Royal Thai Government, DPST

Contact: Karthika Muthukumaraswamy
karthika@siam.org
267-350-6383
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
Science
UNC researchers identify a new pathway that triggers septic shock
Researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have identified a sensor pathway inside cells. These internal sensors are like motion detectors inside a house; they trigger an alarm that signals for help -- a response from the immune system. This research indicates that both exterior and interior sensors work together to detect the same component of bacterial cell membranes, a molecule called lipopolysaccharide or LPS.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Hughes
tahughes@unch.unc.edu
919-966-6047
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
Cell Reports
Protein essential for maintaining beta cell function identified
Researchers at the Pediatric Diabetes Research Center at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have shown that the pancreatic protein Nkx6.1 -- a beta-cell enriched transcription factor -- is essential to maintaining the functional state of beta cells.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Debra Kain
ddkain@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
Science
Local animals' role in human drug-resistant Salmonella may previously have been overstated
A new study has shown that, contrary to popular belief, local domestic animals are unlikely to be the major source of antibiotic resistant Salmonella in humans. The result comes from a detailed study of DNA from more than 370 Salmonella samples collected over a 22-year period.
University of Glasgow, Wellcome Trust, EU 7th Framework Programme, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mark Thomson
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
01-223-492-384
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
American Heart Association High Blood Pressure Research Scientific Sessions 2013
High blood pressure reading in kids linked to triple risk for condition as adults
Kids with at least one high blood pressure reading were about three times more likely to develop the condition as adults.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Veteran's Administration

Contact: Darcy Spitz
Darcy.spitz@heart.org
212-878-5940
American Heart Association

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
American Heart Association High Blood Pressure Research Scientific Sessions 2013
Testing child's urine may help doctors identify risk for high blood pressure
Testing children's urine samples for sodium retention may help doctors identify those at risk for high blood pressure.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Darcy Spitz
Darcy.spitz@heart.org
212-878-5940
American Heart Association

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
Current Biology
Study sheds light on genetics of how and why fish swim in schools
How and why fish swim in schools has long fascinated biologists looking for clues to understand the complexities of social behavior. A new study by a team of researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center may help provide some insight.
NIH/Center of Excellence in Genomic Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Deborah Bach
media@fhcrc.org
206-667-2210
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Better verbal development during childhood linked to later drinking and intoxication
Previous research has found contradictory linkages among cognition, verbal skills, and later alcohol use. A new study has found that better verbal development during childhood predicts more frequent drinking and intoxication during adolescence and young adulthood. Study authors speculate this verbal/alcohol association may be partially due to peer associations.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, The Academy of Finland, The Finnish Foundation

Contact: Antti Latvala, Ph.D.
antti.latvala@helsinki.fi
358-919-127-224
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Individuals with a dual diagnosis can benefit from 12-step programs too
Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous can play an important role in addiction recovery. A new study examines the suitability of 12-step organizations for young adults with co-occurring substance use and psychiatric disorders, referred to as dual diagnosis (DD). Findings indicate that young adult DD patients show similar benefits compared with those diagnosed only with a substance use disorder.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, The Hazelden Foundation

Contact: Brandon G. Bergman, Ph.D.
bgbergman@partners.org
617-643-7563
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 12-Sep-2013
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Sober drinking knowledge often fails 'in the moment' of intoxication
Approximately one-third of all fatal crashes each year in the US involve an alcohol-impaired driver. New research compares individuals' perceived dangerousness of driving after drinking while intoxicated with those perceptions while sober. Results show that sober knowledge does not necessarily translate into responsible judgment while intoxicated.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Denis M. McCarthy, Ph.D.
mccarthydm@missouri.edu
573-882-0426
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
Researchers win $5.25 million NIH grant to develop new single molecule electronic DNA sequencing platform
A team of researchers led by Columbia Engineering professor Jingyue Ju has won a three-year $5.25 million NIH grant to develop a novel integrated miniaturized system for real-time single molecule electronic DNA sequencing. This will help them develop their approach into a robust miniaturized platform that will allow the entire human genome to be deciphered for about $100, creating an ideal platform for personalized medicine and basic biomedical research.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly.evarts@columbia.edu
347-453-7408
Columbia University

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
NIH awards CCNY $1.5 million to train addiction researchers
Aiming to increase the number of scientists from underrepresented minority groups conducting addiction research, the National Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded $1.5 million to support a new training program at the City College of New York.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Ellis Simon
esimon@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-6460
City College of New York

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
Nature
Discovery of cell division 'master controller' may improve understanding and treatment of cancer
In a study to be published in the journal Nature, two Dartmouth researchers have found that the protein cyclin A plays an important but previously unknown role in the cell division process, acting as a master controller to ensure the faithful segregation of chromosomes during cell division.
NIH/National Institute for General Medical Sciences

Contact: Derik Hertel
derik.hertel@dartmouth.edu
603-650-1211
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Showing releases 3301-3325 out of 3465.

<< < 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 > >>

     
   

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