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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3301-3325 out of 3415.

<< < 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 > >>

Public Release: 7-May-2013
Science Signaling
Duke researchers describe how breast cancer cells acquire drug resistance
A seven-year quest to understand how breast cancer cells resist treatment with the targeted therapy lapatinib has revealed a previously unknown molecular network that regulates cell death. The discovery provides new avenues to overcome drug resistance, according to researchers at Duke Cancer Institute.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Susan G. Komen for the Cure

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 7-May-2013
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Pitt discovery holds potential in destroying drug-resistant bacteria
Through the serendipity of science, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have discovered a potential treatment for deadly, drug-resistant bacterial infections that uses the same approach that HIV uses to infect cells. The National Institutes of Health-supported discovery will be described in the June issue of the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. It is especially promising in the development of a potential treatment for lung infections in people with cystic fibrosis.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik & Cyndy McGrath
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 7-May-2013
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
Initiation of breast cancer treatment varies by race; patient-doctor communication is key
Black women with breast cancer were found to be three times more likely than their white counterparts to delay treatment more than 90 days -- a delay associated with increased deaths from the disease. But many women chose to forgo treatment altogether, and the study, published in the May issue of Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, suggests that low satisfaction regarding communication between black women and their doctors is a significant reason why they opt out.
American Cancer Society, Komen for the Cure, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Karen Mallet
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 7-May-2013
Brain Stimulation
Nerve stimulation for severe depression changes brain function
For nearly a decade, doctors have used implanted electronic stimulators to treat severe depression in people who don't respond to standard antidepressant treatments. Now, preliminary brain scan studies conducted by School of Medicine researchers are revealing that vagus nerve stimulation brings about changes in brain metabolism weeks or even months before patients begin to feel better.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, Sidney R. Baer, Jr. Foundation

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 7-May-2013
Psychological Science
Older adults' memory lapses linked to problems processing everyday events
Some memory problems common to older adults may stem from an inability to segment daily life into discrete experiences, according to a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 7-May-2013
Neurology
Restless legs syndrome, insomnia and brain chemistry: A tangled mystery solved?
Johns Hopkins researchers believe they may have discovered an explanation for the sleepless nights associated with restless legs syndrome, a symptom that persists even when the disruptive, overwhelming nocturnal urge to move the legs is treated successfully with medication.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, NIH/National Institute on Aging, and others

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 7-May-2013
BMC Medicine
The brain-gut connection: A link between depression and common hospital-acquired infection
Depression, being widowed and living alone increase risk of serious hospital-acquired infection.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Beata Mostafavi
bmostafa@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 7-May-2013
Alzheimer's & Dementia
Study: Using anticholinergics for as few as 60 days causes memory problems in older adults
Research from the Regenstrief Institute, the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and Wishard-Eskenazi Health on medications commonly taken by older adults has found that drugs with strong anticholinergic effects cause cognitive impairment when taken continuously for as few as 60 days. A similar impact can be seen with 90 days of continuous use when taking multiple drugs with weak anticholinergic effect.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 7-May-2013
Cell Metabolism
Discovery of new hormone opens doors to new type 2 diabetes treatments
Harvard School of Public Health researchers have discovered that a particular type of protein (hormone) found in fat cells helps regulate how glucose (blood sugar) is controlled and metabolized in the liver. Using experimental models and state-of-the-art technology, the scientists found that switching off this protein leads to better control of glucose production from the liver, revealing a potential new target that may be used to treat type 2 diabetes and other metabolic diseases.
National Institutes of Health, and others

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 7-May-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Rats take high-speed multisensory snapshots
New research from the laboratory of CSHL neuroscientist Adam Kepecs shows that rats create high-speed "snapshots" of the environment by synchronized use of the senses of smell (sniffing) and touch (through their whiskers). Furthermore sniffing and "whisking" movements are synchronized at the same phase even when they are running at different frequencies, facilitating integration of multisensory information. The research sheds new light on biological rhythms that may evolutionarily underpin much animal behavior.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Edward Brydon
ebrydon@cshl.edu
516-367-6822
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 7-May-2013
Cell Metabolism
Type 1 diabetes and heart disease linked by inflammatory protein
Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes appears to increase the risk of heart disease, the leading cause of death among people with high blood sugar, partly by stimulating the production of calprotectin, a protein that sparks an inflammatory process that fuels the buildup of artery-clogging plaque. The findings, made in mice and confirmed with human data, suggest new therapeutic targets for reducing heart disease in people with type 1 diabetes.
National Institutes of Health, Diabetes Complications Consortium, Canadian Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Contact: Elizabeth Streich
eas2125@cumc.columbia.edu
212-305-3689
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 7-May-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Theta brainwaves reflect ability to beat built-in bias
Many animals, including humans, harbor ingrained biases to actively obtain rewards and to remain inactive to avoid punishment. Sometimes, however those biases can steer us wrong. A new study finds that theta brainwave activity in the prefrontal cortex predicts how well people can overcome these biases when they are unwanted.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 6-May-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
Millions pass up free health subsidy
Low-income Medicare beneficiaries with poorer cognitive abilities are less likely to enroll in the Low Income Subsidy program, which provides nearly free prescription drug coverage for low-income adults. The findings suggest that even when presented with a single dominant option in the form of free additional drug coverage, many seniors fail to act in their own economic interests.
Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Beeson Career Development Award Program, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 6-May-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Monell scientists identify critical link in mammalian odor detection
Researchers at the Monell Center have identified a protein that is critical to the ability of mammals to smell. Mice engineered to be lacking the Ggamma13 protein in their olfactory receptors were functionally anosmic -- unable to smell. The findings may lend insight into the underlying causes of certain smell disorders in humans.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Leslie Stein
stein@monell.org
267-519-4707
Monell Chemical Senses Center

Public Release: 6-May-2013
Biomaterials
Duke scientists build a living patch for damaged hearts
Duke University biomedical engineers have grown three-dimensional human heart muscle that acts just like natural tissue. This advancement could be important in treating heart attack patients or in serving as a platform for testing new heart disease medicines.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Richard Merritt
richard.merritt@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Public Release: 6-May-2013
Psychological Science
Weight gain linked with personality trait changes
People who gain weight are more likely to give in to temptations but also are more thoughtful about their actions, according to a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 6-May-2013
Environmental Health Perspectives
Ubiquitous engineered nanomaterials cause lung inflammation, study finds
A consortium of scientists from across the country has found that breathing ultrafine particles from a large family of materials that increasingly are found in a host of household and commercial products, from sunscreens to the ink in copy machines to super-strong but lightweight sporting equipment, can cause lung inflammation and damage.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 6-May-2013
Health Affairs
Curbing Medicare costs could drive some seniors out of program, study finds
With Medicare spending projected to account for one-fourth of all federal spending by 2037, discussion has intensified about how to find ways to lower the program's costs. A new study finds that strategies such as increasing premiums and raising the eligibility age can slow Medicare spending. But such approaches also could drive many elderly Americans from the program, leaving them with limited access to health services.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, MacArthur Foundation Research Network on an Aging Society

Contact: Warren Robak
robak@rand.org
310-451-6913
RAND Corporation

Public Release: 6-May-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Breast milk ingredient could prevent deadly intestinal problem in preemies
An ingredient that naturally occurs in breast milk might be used to prevent premature babies from developing a deadly intestinal condition that currently is largely incurable, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC in this week's online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Institutes of Health, Hartwell Foundation, Institute for Transfusion Medicine, Hemophilia Center of Western PA

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 6-May-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Competing antibodies may have limited the protection achieved in HIV vaccine trial in Thailand
Continuing analysis of an HIV vaccine trial undertaken in Thailand is yielding additional information about how immune responses were triggered and why the vaccine did not protect more people.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, US Army Medical Research and Material Command

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-May-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Preclinical study shows heroin vaccine blocks relapse
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have reported successful preclinical tests of a new vaccine against heroin. The vaccine targets heroin and its psychoactive breakdown products in the bloodstream, preventing them from reaching the brain.
The Scripps Research Institute/Pearson Center for Alcoholism and Addiction Research, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 6-May-2013
Environmental Health Perspectives
National study of nanomaterial toxicity sets stage for policies to address health risks
For the first time, researchers from institutions around the country have conducted an identical series of toxicology tests evaluating lung-related health impacts associated with widely used engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). The study provides comparable health risk data from multiple labs, which should help regulators develop policies to protect workers and consumers who come into contact with ENMs.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 6-May-2013
Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting
Nearly 20 percent of suicidal youths have guns in their home
Nearly one in five children and teens found to be at risk for suicide report that there are guns in their homes, and 15 percent of those at risk for suicide with guns in the home know how to access both the guns and the bullets, according to a study to be presented Monday, May 6, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Washington, DC.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Susan Stevens Martin
ssmartin@aap.org
847-434-7131
American Academy of Pediatrics

Public Release: 6-May-2013
Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting
Foster care a sound choice for some maltreated children
Newspaper articles, TV shows and books are filled with horror stories of children placed in foster care. A new study bucks that trend by showing out-of-home placements can improve the emotional health of some youths who have been maltreated by a parent.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Susan Stevens Martin
ssmartin@aap.org
847-434-7131
American Academy of Pediatrics

Public Release: 6-May-2013
Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting
Many parents multi-task while driving kids
Many parents are putting their precious cargo at risk while driving, according to survey results that will be presented May 5 and 6 at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Washington, DC.
Michigan Center for Advancing Safe Transportation Across the Lifespan, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Susan Stevens Martin
ssmartin@aap.org
847-434-7131
American Academy of Pediatrics

Showing releases 3301-3325 out of 3415.

<< < 128 | 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 > >>

     
   

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