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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3326-3350 out of 3754.

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Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
VCU Massey Cancer Center receives $4.4 million NCORP grant
Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center was awarded a $4.4 million, 5-year, renewable grant from the National Cancer Institute to support a statewide network for cancer clinical research in Virginia that brings state-of-the-art clinical trials to patients in their own communities and emphasizes the inclusion of minorities in clinical trials and a focus on research that addresses cancer disparities.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Jenny Owen
jrowen2@vcu.edu
804-229-7575
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
JAMA
UCSF-led study finds SCID previously underdiagnosed in infants with fatal infections
Severe combined immunodeficiency, a potentially life-threatening, but treatable, disorder affecting infants, is twice as common as previously believed, according to a new study that is the first to examine the national impact of this newborn screening test.
National Institutes of Health, Jeffrey Modell Foundation, Perkin Elmer Genetics

Contact: Juliana Bunim
juliana.bunim@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
JAMA
Extended support helps patients stay smoke-free after hospital discharge
A Massachusetts General Hospital study in the Aug. 20 issue of JAMA describes a program that increased the proportion of hospitalized smokers who successfully quit smoking after discharge by more than 70 percent. The system used interactive voice response technology to provide support and stop-smoking medication for three months after smokers left the hospital.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Terri Ogan
togan@partners.org
617-726-0954
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Physically fit kids have beefier brain white matter than their less-fit peers
A new study of 9- and 10-year-olds finds that those who are more aerobically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their peers who are less fit. 'White matter' describes the bundles of axons that carry nerve signals from one brain region to another. More compact white matter is associated with faster and more efficient nerve activity.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Training the next generation of cancer nanomedicine scientists
Northeastern University has received a five-year, $1.15 million grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute to train the next generation of cancer nanomedicine scientists and clinicians through a unique experiential learning program.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Casey Bayer
c.bayer@neu.edu
617-373-2592
Northeastern University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Hope for healthy hearts revealed in naked mole rat studies
The naked mole rat, the longest lived of rodents, shows superior cardiovascular function to old age in two studies released in 2014. The research is from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and collaborating institutions.
American Heart Association, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
BMJ Quality & Safety
Clinical practice guidelines: Trying to get them right the first time
Penn Medicine researchers caution that the rapid adoption of one or two studies as the basis for clinical practice, even if they are randomized controlled trials, can lead to misinformation and potential harm. Using the case of Beta-blockers, they show how clinical practice guidelines are too often adopted quickly then overturned in the ensuing years. Their work is published in the current issue of BMJ Quality and Safety.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Lee-Ann Donegan
leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5660
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Proteins critical to wound healing identified
Mice missing two important proteins of the vascular system develop normally and appear healthy in adulthood, as long as they don't become injured. If they do, their wounds don't heal properly, a new study shows. The research, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, may have implications for treating diseases involving abnormal blood vessel growth, such as the impaired wound healing often seen in diabetes and the loss of vision caused by macular degeneration.
National Institutes of Health, Carl Marshall Reeves and Mildred Almen Reeves Foundation Inc.

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Psychophysiology
Taking the pulse of aging
In an effort to identify how the elasticity of the arteries in the brain correlates with aging well, researchers at the Beckman Institute used optical methods developed in their lab to map out the pulse pressure of the entire brain's cortex.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, National Science Foundation

Contact: August Cassens
acassens@illinois.edu
217-300-4181
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Schizophrenia Research
Happiness in schizophrenia
Schizophrenia is among the most severe forms of mental illness, yet some people with the disease are as happy as those in good physical and mental health according to a study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
Massachussetts General-developed device monitors key step in development of tumor metastases
A microfluidic device developed at Massachusetts General Hospital may help study key steps in the process by which cancer cells break off from a primary tumor to invade other tissues and form metastases.
Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Aspirin, take 2
In a new paper, published this week in the online early edition of PNAS, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine conclude that aspirin has a second effect: Not only does it kill cyclooxygenase, thus preventing production of the prostaglandins that cause inflammation and pain, it also prompts the enzyme to generate another compound that hastens the end of inflammation, returning the affected cells to homeostatic health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Nature Materials
Engineering long-lasting joint lubrication by mimicking nature
By finding a way to bind a slippery molecule naturally found in the fluid that surrounds healthy joints, Johns Hopkins researchers have engineered surfaces that have the potential to deliver long-lasting lubrication at specific spots throughout the body. The finding, described in the Aug. 3 online edition of Nature Materials, could eventually offer a new way to ease the pain of arthritic joints, keep artificial joints working smoothly or even make contact lenses more comfortable.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, Arthritis Research Foundation, US Department of Defense, Wallace H. Coulter Foundation, Ort Philanthropic Fund and Research to Prevent

Contact: Lauren Nelson
lnelso35@jhmi.edu
410-955-8725
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Blood pressure medication does not cause more falls
It's time to question the common belief that patients receiving intensive blood pressure treatment are prone to falling and breaking bones. A comprehensive study in people ages 40 to 79 with diabetes, led by Karen Margolis, M.D., of HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research in the US, found no evidence supporting this belief. The study appears in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, published by Springer.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Laura Zimmermann
laura.zimmermann@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Cancer Cell
New mouse model points to therapy for liver disease
In a paper published online in Cancer Cell, scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine describe a novel mouse model that closely resembles human NASH and use it to demonstrate that interference with a key inflammatory protein inhibits both the development of NASH and its progression to liver cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Superfund Basic Research Program, Daiichi Sankyo Foundation of Life Science and Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research, Astellas Foundation for Research

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Study suggests hatha yoga boosts brain function in older adults
Practicing hatha yoga three times a week for eight weeks improved sedentary older adults' performance on cognitive tasks that are relevant to everyday life, researchers report.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Prioritizing suicide research can help lead to fewer suicide attempts and deaths
In a new supplement to the September issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, experts address the state of the science on suicide prevention and provide useful recommendations for research to inform effective suicide prevention. Suicide has been a challenging and perplexing public health issue to study as it has many dimensions and underlying factors. Although much is known about the patterns and potential risk factors of suicide, the national suicide rate does not appear to have dropped over the last 50 years.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences, National Institutes of Health Office of Disease Prevention

Contact: Angela J. Beck
ajpmmedia@elsevier.com
734-764-8775
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Psychological Science
Visual 'gist' helps us figure out where a crowd is looking
Have you ever seen a crowd of people looking off into the distance, perhaps toward a passing biker or up to the top of a building? You probably looked there, too, instantly, even without paying attention to the individuals in the group. Researchers have discovered that we rely on a specialized visual process known as 'ensemble coding' to perceive where a crowd is looking.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Worm virus details come to light
Rice University scientists have won a race to report the structure of the first virus known to naturally infect nematodes.
Welch Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Kresge Science Initiative Endowment Fund at Rice, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Gulf Coast Consortia

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Selective therapy may improve artery repair after interventional cardiovascular procedures
A new therapy developed by researchers at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine and Columbia University Medical Center may help reduce the life-threatening complications of interventional cardiovascular disease treatment. The preclinical study is reported in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, American Heart Association

Contact: Anne DeLotto Baier
abaier@health.usf.edu
813-974-3303
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Club cells are 'bad guys' during flu infection
Researchers show that a specialized subset of lung cells can shake flu infection, yet they remain stamped with an inflammatory gene signature that wreaks havoc in the lung.
Research Training Program in Molecular and Cellular Hematology, NIH/Centers for Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association
Hospitalizations, deaths from heart disease, stroke drop in last decade
US hospitalization and death rates for heart disease and stroke dropped significantly in the last decade. Rates declined more for these conditions than for any others. Improved lifestyle, quality of care and prevention strategies contributed to the decrease.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Cathy Lewis
cathy.lewis@heart.org
214-706-1324
American Heart Association

Public Release: 18-Aug-2014
2014 American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
Study finds women seek anti-aging clinicians to treat menopausal symptoms
Feeling that conventional doctors did not take their suffering seriously, women instead sought out hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms from anti-aging clinicians, according to a Case Western Reserve University study that investigated the appeal of anti-aging medicine.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 17-Aug-2014
Nature Neuroscience
DNA methylation involved in Alzheimer's disease
A new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Rush University Medical Center, reveals how early changes in brain DNA methylation are involved in Alzheimer's disease.
National Institutes of Health, Siragusa Foundation, Robert and Clarice Smith and Abigail Van Buren Alzheimer's Disease Research Program, Alzheimer's Research UK

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 17-Aug-2014
Nature Methods
A shift in the code: New method reveals hidden genetic landscape
With three billion letters in the human genome, it seems hard to believe that adding or removing a base could have much of an effect on our health. Yet, such insertions and deletions can dramatically alter biological function. It is has been difficult to detect these mutations. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists have devised a new way to analyze genome sequences that pinpoints insertions and deletions in people with diseases such as autism, obsessive compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Simons Foundation

Contact: Jaclyn Jansen
jjansen@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Showing releases 3326-3350 out of 3754.

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