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News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3326-3350 out of 3398.

<< < 129 | 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 > >>

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Obesity
Study explains what triggers those late-night snack cravings
A study co-authored by an Oregon Health and Science University researcher finds that the circadian system increases hunger and cravings for sweet, starchy and salty foods in the evenings. Eating higher-calorie foods in the evening can be counterproductive if weight loss is a goal since the human body handles nutrients differently depending on the time of day.
National Institutes of Health, NASA

Contact: Mirabai Vogt
vogtmi@ohsu.edu
503-494-7986
Oregon Health & Science University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Nature Communications
Silicone liquid crystal stiffens with repeated compression
Rice University scientists find liquid crystalline silicone stiffens significantly when compressed repeatedly for hours on end. The discovery may lead to new strategies for self-healing materials or biocompatible materials that mimic human tissues.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Welch Foundation

Contact: Mike Williams
mikewilliams@rice.edu
713-348-6728
Rice University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scripps Research Institute scientists discover how a protein finds its way
Scientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute have uncovered how an enzyme co-factor can bestow specificity on a class of proteins with otherwise nonspecific biochemical activity.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Rare, lethal childhood disease tracked to protein
Scientists have identified how a defective protein plays a central role in a rare, lethal childhood disease known as giant axonal neuropathy, or GAN. GAN is an extremely rare and untreatable genetic disorder that strikes the central and peripheral nervous systems of young children.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Hannah's Hope Fund

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
Surgery for nonfatal skin cancers might not be best for elderly patients
Surgery is often recommended for skin cancers, but older, sicker patients can endure complications as a result and may not live long enough to benefit from the treatment.
NIH/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
elizabeth.fernandez@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Nature Photonics
'Super-resolution' microscope possible for nanostructures
Researchers have found a way to see synthetic nanostructures and molecules using a new type of super-resolution optical microscopy that does not require fluorescent dyes, representing a practical tool for biomedical and nanotechnology research.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
JAMA Internal Medicine
Antidepressants linked with increased risks after surgery
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) -- among the most widely prescribed antidepressant medications -- are associated with increased risk of bleeding, transfusion, hospital readmission and death when taken around the time of surgery, according to an analysis led by researchers at UC San Francisco and Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, Mass.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Juliana Bunim
juliana.bunim@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study identifies key shift in the brain that creates drive to overeat
A team of American and Italian neuroscientists has identified a cellular change in the brain that accompanies obesity. The findings could explain the body's tendency to maintain undesirable weight levels, rather than an ideal weight, and identify possible targets for pharmacological efforts to address obesity. "This study identifies a mechanism for the body's ongoing tendency to return to the heavier weight," said Indiana University neuroscientist Ken Mackie.
National Institutes of Health, Compagnia di San Paolo

Contact: Liz Rosdeitcher
rosdeitc@indiana.edu
812-855-4507
Indiana University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Nature
Cat and mouse: A single gene matters
A Northwestern University study involving olfactory receptors provides evidence that a single gene is necessary for a mouse to avoid a cat. A research team has shown that removing one olfactory receptor from mice can have a profound effect on their behavior. The gene, called TAAR4, encodes a receptor that responds to a chemical that is enriched in the urine of carnivores. While normal mice innately avoid the scent marks of predators, mice lacking the TAAR4 receptor do not.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Whitehall Foundation, Brain Research Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Scientific Reports
NYU and NYU Langone researchers devise method for enhancing CEST MRI
Researchers at NYU and NYU Langone Medical Center have created a novel way to enhance MRI by reducing interference from large macromolecules that can often obscure images generated by current chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) methods.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Big data analysis identifies prognostic RNA markers in a common form of breast cancer
An analysis that integrates three large sets of genomic data available through The Cancer Genome Atlas has identified 37 RNA molecules that might predict survival in patients with the most common form of breast cancer. The study analyzed large masses of data from 466 cases of the most common type of breast cancer and provides the first prognostic signature in cancer composed of both mRNA and microRNA.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Italian Association for Cancer Research

Contact: Darrell E. Ward
darrell.ward@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Advanced Functional Materials
Patterned hearts
A team of bioengineers at Brigham and Women's Hospital is the first to report creating artificial heart tissue that closely mimics the functions of natural heart tissue through the use of human-based materials. Their work will advance how clinicians treat the damaging effects caused by heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-534-2208
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Nature Methods
Comparing proteins at a glance
A revolutionary X-ray analytical technique enables researchers at a glance to identify structural similarities and differences between multiple proteins under a variety of conditions and has already been used to gain valuable new insight into a prime protein target for cancer chemotherapy.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Developmental Cell
UNC research uncovers molecular role of gene linked to blood vessel formation
University of North Carolina researchers have discovered that disrupting a gene that acts as a regulatory switch to turn on other genes can keep blood vessels from forming and developing properly.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association

Contact: Tom Hughes
tahughes@unch.unc.edu
919-966-6047
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Carnegie Mellon neuroscientists use statistical model to draft fantasy teams of neurons
This past weekend teams from the National Football League used statistics like height, weight and speed to draft the best college players, and in a few weeks, armchair enthusiasts will use similar measures to select players for their own fantasy football teams. Neuroscientists at Carnegie Mellon University are taking a similar approach to compile "dream teams" of neurons using a statistics-based method that can evaluate the fitness of individual neurons.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Commentary calls for greater transparency in highlighting social value of research
In a commentary published in the May issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, UC Davis bioethicist Mark Yarborough proposes that more information about the social value of individual research studies be made available to prospective research participants during the informed consent process so they are more aware of the degree to which a study has the potential to improve health for all.
NIH/National Center for Accelerating Translational Science

Contact: Carole Gan
carole.gan@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9047
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 29-Apr-2013
Developmental Cell
Growing new arteries, bypassing blocked ones
Scientific collaborators from Yale School of Medicine and University College London have uncovered the molecular pathway by which new arteries may form after heart attacks, strokes and other acute illnesses bypassing arteries that are blocked. Their study appears in the April 29 issue of Developmental Cell.
National Institutes of Health, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Helen Dodson
helen.dodson@yale.edu
203-436-3984
Yale University

Public Release: 26-Apr-2013
Pediatric Transplantation
New approaches in treating complicated childhood polycystic kidney disease
A collaborative team of physician-scientists at the Medical College of Wisconsin and Children's Hospital of Wisconsin Research Institute has developed a new evidence-based, clinical algorithm to help physicians treat complex patients with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Maureen Mack
mmack@mcw.edu
414-955-4744
Medical College of Wisconsin

Public Release: 26-Apr-2013
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Hitting 'reset' in protein synthesis restores myelination
A potential new treatment strategy for patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is on the horizon, thanks to research by neuroscientists now at the University at Buffalo's Hunter James Kelly Research Institute and their colleagues in Italy and England.
National Institutes of Health, European Community, Italian Ministry of Health

Contact: Ellen Goldbaum
goldbaum@buffalo.edu
716-645-4605
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 25-Apr-2013
Cell
Scientists discover new way protein degradation is regulated
Researchers at The Rockefeller University and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have identified the mechanism by which the cell's protein recycler, the proteasome, ramps up its activity to take care of unwanted and potentially toxic proteins. The finding, which has implications for treating muscle wasting neurodegeneration, also suggests that small molecule inhibitors of this mechanism may be clinically useful in treating multiple myeloma.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Joseph Bonner
joseph.bonner@rockefeller.edu
212-327-8998
Rockefeller University

Public Release: 25-Apr-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists create novel approach to find RNAs involved in long-term memory storage
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute, Columbia University and the University of Florida, Gainesville, have developed a novel strategy for isolating and characterizing a substantial number of RNAs transported from the cell-body of neuron (nerve cell) to the synapse, the small gap separating neurons that enables cell to cell communication.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health, McKnight Brain Research Foundation, Whitehall Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 25-Apr-2013
European Journal of Neuroscience
Forced exercise may still protect against anxiety and stress, says CU-Boulder study
Being forced to exercise may still help reduce anxiety and depression just as exercising voluntarily does, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Benjamin Greenwood
ben.greenwood@colorado.edu
303-492-4009
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 25-Apr-2013
Applied Physics Letters
New imaging technology could reveal cellular secrets
Researchers have married two biological imaging technologies, creating a new way to learn how good cells go bad.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 25-Apr-2013
Nature Communications
Thanks to rare alpine bacteria, researchers identify one of alcohol's key gateways to the brain
Thanks to a rare bacteria that grows only on rocks in the Swiss Alps, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and the Pasteur Institute in France have been the first to identify how alcohol might affect key brain proteins.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Neurosypres EC, NicoChimera

Contact: Adron Harris
harris@mail.utexas.edu
512-232-2514
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 25-Apr-2013
Nature
Bold move forward in molecular analyses
New metrics for analyzing data from small angle scattering experiments should dramatically improve the ability of scientists to study the structures of macromolecules such as proteins and nanoparticles in solution.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Showing releases 3326-3350 out of 3398.

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