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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3351-3375 out of 3480.

<< < 130 | 131 | 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 139 > >>

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
Journal of American Medical Directors Association
Using mobile devices to look up drug info prevents adverse events in nursing homes
Nearly nine out of 10 nursing home physicians said that using their mobile devices to look up prescription drug information prevented at least one adverse drug event in the previous month, according to a University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine study published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Aging, National Library of Medicine, US Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
UCLA to house worldwide database of brain images for chronic-pain conditions
A new database featuring hundreds of brain scans and other key clinical information will help researchers tease out similarities and differences between these and many other chronic-pain conditions, helping to accelerate research and treatment development.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rachel Champeau
rchampeau@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2270
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
Journal of Early Adolescence
Poor rural youth in Haiti are rich in family ties, rooted in their own culture
Haitian teens, especially those who live in the country's rural areas, are among the poorest persons in the Western Hemisphere, but they are rich in their family relationships and strongly rooted in their own culture, a University of Illinois study finds.
Mellon Foundation, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health

Contact: Phyllis Picklesimer
p-pickle@illinois.edu
217-244-2827
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
Cell Reports
Glowing neurons reveal networked link between brain, whiskers
New research on mouse whiskers from Duke University reveals a surprise -- at the fine scale, the sensory system's wiring diagram doesn't have a set pattern. And it's probably the case that no two people's touch sensory systems are wired exactly the same at the detailed level, according to Fan Wang, Ph.D., an associate professor of neurobiology in the Duke Medical School.
National Institutes of Health, Swiss National Foundation, Kanton Basel-Stadt, European Research Council Advanced Grant, Novartis Research Foundation

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
Neuron
Schizophrenia linked to abnormal brain waves
MIT neuroscientists discover neurological hyperactivity that produces disordered thinking.
RIKEN Brain Science Institute, National Institutes of Health, Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, NARSAD Young Investigator Award, Johns Hopkins Brain Science Institute

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
New England Journal of Medicine
Genetic mutation linked to Alzheimer's disease doubles rate of brain tissue loss, USC study shows
Carriers of a specific genetic mutation linked to Alzheimer's disease lose 1.4 percent to 3.3 percent more of their brain tissue than non-carriers, and twice as fast, which indicates more rapid onset of the disease. For the first time, researchers show how the TREM2 genetic mutation physically affects the living human brain.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Alison Trinidad
alison.trinidad@usc.edu
323-442-3941
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
Neurology
Finding Alzheimer's disease before symptoms start
Johns Hopkins researchers say that by measuring levels of certain proteins in cerebrospinal fluid, they can predict when people will develop the cognitive impairment associated with Alzheimer's disease years before the first symptoms of memory loss appear.
National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
Nature
Genetic errors identified in 12 major cancer types
Examining 12 major types of cancer, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified 127 repeatedly mutated genes that appear to drive the development and progression of a range of tumors in the body. The discovery sets the stage for devising new diagnostic tools and more personalized cancer treatments.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Caroline Arbanas
arbanasc@wustl.edu
314-286-0109
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
Cell Host & Microbe
Study shows how Staph toxin disarms the immune system
Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have discovered a new mechanism by which the deadly Staphylococcus aureus bacteria attack and kill off immune cells. Their findings, published today in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, explain a critical survival tactic of a pathogen that causes more skin and heart infections than any other microbe, and kills more than 100,000 Americans every year.
National Institutes of Health, New York University School of Medicine Development Funds, American Heart Association Scientist Development Grant

Contact: Lisa Greiner
lisa.greiner@nyumc.org
646-592-3044
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
Neuron
'Individualized' therapy for the brain targets specific gene mutations causing dementia and ALS
Johns Hopkins scientists have developed new drugs that -- at least in a laboratory dish -- appear to halt the brain-destroying impact of a genetic mutation at work in some forms of two incurable diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and dementia.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, P2ALS, Muscular Dystrophy Association, ALS Association

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
PLOS ONE
Elusive secret of HIV long-term immunity
Scientists have discovered a long sought, critical new clue about why some people are able to control the HIV virus long term without taking antiviral drugs. The finding may be useful in shortening drug treatment for everyone else with HIV. These rare individuals have an extra helping of an immune protein that blocks HIV from spreading within the body by turning it into an impotent wimp. Earlier treatment could protect reserves of the critical protein for everyone.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 16-Oct-2013
Neuron
Rare gene mutation sheds light on protein's role in brain development
Though worlds apart, four unrelated families have been united in a medical mystery over the source of a rare inherited disorder that results in their children being born with abnormal brain growth and severe functional impairments.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering
Restoring surgeons' sense of touch during minimally invasive surgeries
A team of engineers and doctors has developed a new wireless capsule that can give surgeons back their sense of touch when performing minimally invasive surgery.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
JAMA
More than 40 percent of men over 75 undergo PSA screening despite national recommendations
Many primary care doctors continue to administer the prostate-specific antigen test to even their oldest patients despite the fact that no medical organization recommends prostate cancer screening for men older than 75, according to new research from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. In a research letter published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, UTMB researchers found a high variability in standard PSA-ordering practice among primary care physicians.
Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas, National Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, University of Texas Medical Branch

Contact: Molly Dannenmaier
mjdannen@utmb.edu
409-771-5105
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
UCLA, USC get $2M to develop stroke center network in Southland
A three-way partnership between the UCLA Stroke Center at the Ronald Reagan Medical Center, the University of Southern California (USC) Comprehensive Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center at Keck Medicine of USC, and UC Irvine has been awarded a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to address those three stroke priorities.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mark Wheeler
mwheeler@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2265
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Grant helps researchers study 'turbocharger effect' in skeletal muscle
University of Cincinnati researchers have been awarded a five-year, $2.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study an isoform that plays a critical role in human resistance to fatigue.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Keith Herrell
keith.herrell@uc.edu
513-558-4559
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Research team wins grant to continue development of portable sensor
University of Cincinnati researchers have received a four-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to continue development of a portable sensor that will be used to measure metal levels in humans.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Keith Herrell
keith.herrell@uc.edu
513-558-4559
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Cancer Cell
Small bits of genetic material fight cancer's spread
Researchers at Princeton University have found that microRNAs -- small bits of genetic material capable of repressing the expression of certain genes -- may serve as both therapeutic targets and predictors of metastasis, or a cancer's spread from its initial site to other parts of the body.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
American Journal of Epidemiology
Johns Hopkins-led study shows increased life expectancy among family caregivers
Contradicting long-standing conventional wisdom, results of a Johns Hopkins-led analysis of data previously gathered on more than 3,000 family caregivers suggests that those who assist a chronically ill or disabled family member enjoy an 18 percent survival advantage compared to statistically matched non-caregivers.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Department of Health and Human Services

Contact: John Lazarou
jlazaro1@jhmi.edu
410-502-8902
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Einstein and Montefiore receive $25 million NIH grant to support clinical and translational research
Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center have received a $25 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for the Harold and Muriel Block Institute for Clinical and Translational Research at Einstein and Montefiore. The two institutions received their initial Clinical and Translational Science Award from the NIH in 2008 to launch this joint collaboration.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Journal of Infectious Diseases
Beyond antibiotics: 'PPMOs' offer new approach to bacterial infection, other diseases
Researchers today announced the successful use of a new type of antibacterial agent called a PPMO, which appears to function as well or better than an antibiotic, but may be more precise and also solve problems with antibiotic resistance. The new PPMOs offer a fundamentally different way to attack bacterial infection.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bruce Geller
gellerb@orst.edu
541-737-1845
Oregon State University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Journal of Infectious Diseases
UT Southwestern reports promising new approach to drug-resistant infections
A new type of antibiotic called a PPMO, which works by blocking genes essential for bacterial reproduction, successfully killed a multidrug-resistant germ common to health care settings, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Debbie Bolles
debbie.bolles@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Cell Reports
Halloween candy spooks aging digestive systems! Research in fruit flies helps explain why
Halloween candy spooks aging digestive systems! Research in fruit flies helps explain why.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Ellison Medical Foundation

Contact: Kris Rebillot
krebillot@buckinstitute.org
415-209-2080
Buck Institute for Age Research

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Scientists unravel mechanisms in chronic itching
New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that chronic itching, which can occur in many medical conditions, is different from the urge to scratch a mosquito bite. Chronic itching appears to incorporate more than just the nerve cells that normally transmit itch signals. In chronic itching, neurons that send itch signals also co-opt pain neurons to intensify the itch sensation.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH/National Eye Institute, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
PLOS ONE
Penn researchers take first step toward a macular dystrophy gene therapy
With a new study, University of Pennsylvania researchers report "encouraging" findings that mark the first clear step in developing a gene therapy that could prevent vision loss or event restore vision in individuals suffering from vision-robbing conditions called bestrophinopathies.
Foundation Fighting Blindness, Macula Vision Research Foundation, NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Showing releases 3351-3375 out of 3480.

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