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Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3401-3425 out of 3817.

<< < 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 139 | 140 | 141 > >>

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery
Thyroid cancer rates in Pennsylvania rising faster than rest of country
Incidence of thyroid cancer is rising faster in Pennsylvania than in the rest of the United States, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Matt Solovey
msolovey@hmc.psu.edu
717-531-8606
Penn State

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
How skin falls apart: Pathology of autoimmune skin disease is revealed at the nanoscale
University at Buffalo researchers and colleagues studying a rare, blistering disease have discovered new details of how autoantibodies destroy healthy cells in skin.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, University at Buffalo

Contact: Ellen Goldbaum
goldbaum@buffalo.edu
716-645-4605
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Obesity
Teens' neural response to food commercials predicts future weight gain
In the first prospective longitudinal study to investigate neural response to unhealthy food commercials, Oregon Research Institute scientist Sonja Yokum, Ph.D., and her team found that adolescents showing elevated responses in reward regions to food commercials gained more weight over one year compared to those with less activation in these brain regions. The magnitude of these effects is much larger than effects for established risk factors for future weight gain, such as parental obesity.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Rudd Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Contact: Kathryn Madden
kathryn@ori.org
541-484-3346
Oregon Research Institute

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Fish and fatty acid consumption associated with lower risk of hearing loss in women
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital found that consumption of 2 or more servings of fish per week was associated with a lower risk of hearing loss in women.
National Institutes of Health, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

Contact: Elaine St. Peter
estpeter@partners.org
617-525-6375
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
New 3-D imaging techniques may improve understanding of biofuel plant material
A comparison of 3-D transmission electron microscopy imaging techniques reveals never-seen-before details of plant cell walls has been published in the journal PLOS ONE.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kayla Graham
onepress@plos.org
PLOS

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Child Development
Mothers' responses to babies' crying: Benefiting from and getting over childhood experiences
A study of 259 first-time mothers, published in the journal Child Development, has found that mothers whose childhood experiences with caregivers were positive, and those who came to terms with negative experiences, respond more sensitively to their own babies' cries. Mothers came from a wide range of racial and socio-economic backgrounds.They were followed from pregnancy until their babies were 6 months old.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Radiology
MRI shows gray matter myelin loss strongly related to MS disability
People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in the gray matter of their brains and the loss is closely correlated with the severity of the disease, according to a new magnetic resonance imaging study. Researchers said the findings could have important applications in clinical trials and treatment monitoring.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Linda Brooks
lbrooks@rsna.org
630-590-7762
Radiological Society of North America

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
High Blood Pressure Research Meeting
Using plants to produce enzyme may provide treatment for high blood pressure in lungs
Using plant leaves to produce and deliver a key enzyme may someday improve treatment for life-threatening high blood pressure in the lungs. Plant-based therapy would be less expensive and easier to take than enzyme therapies delivered by injection.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, American Heart Association

Contact: Maggie Francis
maggie.francis@heart.org
214-706-1382
American Heart Association

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
High Blood Pressure Research Meeting
Small weight gain can raise blood pressure in healthy adults
Gaining a few pounds can increase blood pressure in healthy adults. Increased fat inside the abdomen led to even larger increases in blood pressure.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association

Contact: Maggie Francis
Maggie.Francis@heart.org
214-706-1382
American Heart Association

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Lady baboons with guy pals live longer
Numerous studies have linked social interaction to improved health and survival in humans, and new research confirms that the same is true for baboons. A long-term study of more than 200 wild female baboons finds that the most sociable females live two to three years longer than their socially isolated counterparts. Socializing with males gave females an even bigger longevity boost than socializing with other females, the researchers found.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
JAMA
UT Southwestern expert co-chairs national team to develop first comprehensive guidelines for management of sickle cell disease
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has released the first comprehensive, evidence-based guidelines for management of sickle cell disease from birth to end of life.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Lori Sundeen Soderbergh
lori.soderbergh@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
PLOS Genetics
Less effective DNA repair process takes over as mice age
Biologists Vera Gorbunova and Andrei Seluanov have discovered one reason for increasing DNA damage in older vertebrates: the primary repair process begins to fail with increasing age and is replaced by one that is less accurate.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Peter Iglinski
peter.iglinski@rochester.edu
585-273-4726
University of Rochester

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Kessler Foundation multiple sclerosis researchers find role for working memory in cognitive reserve
Kessler Foundation scientists have shown that working memory may be an underlying mechanism of cognitive reserve in multiple sclerosis. This finding informs the relationships between working memory, intellectual enrichment and long-term memory in this population. Joshua Sandry, Ph.D., and James F. Sumowski, Ph.D. 'Working memory mediates the relationship between intellectual enrichment and long-term memory in multiple sclerosis: An exploratory analysis of cognitive reserve' was published by Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.
National Institutes of Health, National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Contact: Carolann Murphy
CMurphy@kesslerfoundation.org
973-324-8382
Kessler Foundation

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
BMC Genomics
Penn study finds genetic mutations linked with ethnic disparities in cancer
In a new study published in the journal BMC Medical Genomics, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania identified more than 30 previously undescribed mutations in important regulatory molecules called microRNAs. Many of these mutations influence whether a person develops cancer or the severity of the disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Circulation
Temple University researchers identify a new target for treating heart failure
The researchers examined the effect of arginine vasopressin on the heart.
National Institutes of Health, Pennsylvania Health Research Formula Fund, American Heart Association

Contact: Rebecca Harmon
Rebecca.Harmon@tuhs.temple.edu
215-707-8229
Temple University Health System

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
American Journal of Pathology
Growth factors found in breast milk may protect against necrotizing enterocolitis
Necrotizing enterocolitis is a devastating gastrointestinal illness affecting up to 10 percent of premature infants, with a 30 percent mortality rate, and formula feeding has been identified as a risk factor for NEC. A study published in The American Journal of Pathology found that growth factors present in human breast milk, but not in formula, may explain the protection against intestinal damage. Further, supplementing the diet of newborn NEC-affected rodents with these growth factors promotes epithelial cell survival.
National Institutes of Health, Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America

Contact: Eileen Leahy
ajpmedia@elsevier.com
732-238-3628
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
BioMed Central Public Health
Texting gives a voice to community members
If you want to learn more about the people in urban communities, save a stamp on mailing a survey. Just text them.
Detroit Urban Research Center, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Beata Mostafavi
bmostafa@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Brain structure could predict risky behavior
Some people avoid risks at all costs, while others will put their wealth, health, and safety at risk without a thought. Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have found that the volume of the parietal cortex in the brain could predict where people fall on the risk-taking spectrum.
NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Study sheds light on asthma and respiratory viruses
In a new study that compared people with and without asthma, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found no difference in the key immune response to viruses in the lungs and breathing passages. The work suggests that a fundamental antiviral defense mechanism is intact in asthma. This means that another aspect of the immune system must explain the difficulty people with asthma have when they encounter respiratory viruses.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Roche Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
New glaucoma cause discovered
Scientists have discovered a novel cause of glaucoma in an animal model, and related to their findings, are now developing an eye drop aimed at curing the disease. They believe their findings will be important to human glaucoma. A cure for glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness in the US, has been elusive because the basis of the disease is poorly understood.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
International Journal of Obesity
Race and ethnicity important when evaluating risk of fat around the heart
A man's likelihood of accumulating fat around his heart -- an important indicator of heart disease risk -- may be better determined if doctors consider his race and ethnicity, as well as where on his body he's building up excess fat, reveals an international evaluation led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
HydzikAM@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Why humans don't suffer from chimpanzee malaria
The DNA region controlling red-blood-cell invasion holds the genetic key to human malaria infection, according to new research. By comparing the genomes of malaria parasites that affect chimpanzees and those that affect humans, researchers discovered that it is the difference in the parasites' surface proteins that determine which host it will infect.
Wellcome Trust, European Union's 7th Framework Programme, National Institutes of Health, Agence Nationale de la Recherche, European Research Council

Contact: Mary Clarke
press.office@sanger.ac.uk
44-122-349-5328
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
American Journal of Pathology
Breast milk may be protective against devastating intestinal disorder
Studies conducted by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles demonstrate that a protein called neuregulin-4 -- present in breast milk, but absent from formula -- may be protective against the intestinal destruction caused in necrotizing enterocolitis.
National Institutes of Health, Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, Saban Research Institute

Contact: Ellin Kavanagh
ekavanagh@chla.usc.edu
323-361-1812
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Journal of Adolescent Health
IU study links skipping school, failing tests to more sex, less condom use in teenagers
An Indiana University study, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, showed that young women's weekday reports of skipping school and failing a test were significantly linked to more frequent vaginal sex, less frequent condom use and different sexual emotions, on that same day.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Eric Schoch
eschoch@iu.edu
317-274-8205
Indiana University

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Intervention in 6-month-olds with autism eliminates symptoms, developmental delay
Treatment at the earliest age when autism spectrum disorder is detectable -- in infants as young as 6 months old -- significantly reduces symptoms so that by age 3 most who received the therapy had neither autism nor delay, a UC Davis MIND Institute research study has found.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Showing releases 3401-3425 out of 3817.

<< < 132 | 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 139 | 140 | 141 > >>

     
   

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