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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3426-3450 out of 3608.

<< < 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 139 | 140 | 141 | 142 > >>

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Massage therapy improves circulation, eases muscle soreness
Massage therapy improves general blood flow and alleviates muscle soreness after exercise, according to a study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Massage Therapy Foundation, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Jeanne Galatzer-Levy
jgala@uic.edu
312-996-1583
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Developmental Cell
Dual role: Key cell division proteins also power up mitochondria
An international team led by researchers at UC Davis has shown that the cyclin B1/Cdk1 protein complex, which plays a key role in cell division, also boosts the mitochondrial activity to power that process.
DOE Office of Science, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dorsey Griffith
dorsey.griffith@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9118
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Cell Reports
Surprise: Lost stem cells naturally replaced by non-stem cells, fly research suggests
Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered an unexpected phenomenon in the organs that produce sperm in fruit flies: When a certain kind of stem cell is killed off experimentally, another group of non-stem cells can come out of retirement to replace them.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
American Journal of Human Genetics
Refining the language for chromosomes
Brigham and Women's Hospital proposes a new classification system that may standardize how structural chromosomal rearrangements are described.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marjorie Montemayor-Quellenberg
mmontemayor-quellenberg@partners.org
617-525-6383
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Novel stapled peptide nanoparticle combination prevents RSV infection, study finds
A new preclinical study by teams at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's/Harvard and James A. Haley VA Hospital/University of South Florida suggests that a combination of advanced technologies may lead to a therapy to prevent or treat respiratory syncytial virus, a potentially lethal respiratory infection affecting infants, young children and the elderly.
National Institutes of Health, US Deptartment of Veterans Affairs, Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award

Contact: Anne DeLotto Baier
abaier@health.usf.edu
813-974-3300
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
Connecting sleep deficits among young fruit flies to disruption in mating later in life
Mom always said you need your sleep, and it turns out, she was right. According to a new study published in Science, the lack of sleep in young fruit flies profoundly diminishes their ability to do one thing they do really, really well -- make more flies.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Molecular Cell
Discovery could lead to novel therapies for Fragile X syndrome
Scientists studying the most common form of inherited mental disability -- a genetic disease called 'Fragile X syndrome' -- have uncovered new details about the cellular processes responsible for the condition that could lead to the development of therapies to restore some of the capabilities lost in affected individuals.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
PLOS Genetics
Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced
A ten-year effort by an international team has sequenced the entire genome and all the RNA products of the most important pathogenic lineage of Cryptococcus neoformans, a strain called H99.These genetic instructions can give valuable insight into why a fungus responsible for a million cases of pneumonia and meningitis every year is so malleable and dangerous.
National Institutes of Health, French National Research Agency, National Health and Medical Research

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Neuron
Neurons in the brain tune into different frequencies for different spatial memory tasks
Your brain transmits information about your current location and memories of past locations over the same neural pathways using different frequencies of a rhythmic electrical activity called gamma waves, report neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin. The research, published in the journal Neuron on April 17, may provide insight into the cognitive and memory disruptions seen in diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's, in which gamma waves are disturbed.
Klingenstein Fund, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Developmental Science
IU cognitive scientists use 'I spy' to show spoken language helps direct children's eyes
In a new study, Indiana U. cognitive scientists demonstrate that children spot objects more quickly when prompted by words than if they are only prompted by images. Spoken language taps into children's cognitive system, enhancing their ability to learn and to navigate cluttered environments. As such the study opens up new avenues for research into the way language might shape the course of developmental disabilities such as ADHD, difficulties with school, and other attention-related problems.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Development

Contact: Liz Rosdeitcher
rosdeitc@indiana.edu
812-855-4507
Indiana University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Biomedical Optics Express
New technique detects microscopic diabetes-related eye damage
Indiana University researchers have detected new early-warning signs of the potential loss of sight associated with diabetes. This discovery could have far-reaching implications for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic retinopathy, potentially impacting the care of over 25 million Americans.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Tracy James
traljame@iu.edu
812-855-0084
Indiana University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
High-level NIH grant goes to professor Nicolas Doucet of INRS
Professor Nicolas Doucet of the Centre INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier has just received a research grant from the National Institutes of Health in the amount of nearly $600,000. The five-year grant is to pursue cutting-edge research in the workings of tiny proteins called RNases and to explore their biomedical potential in the field of oncology as well as in inflammation and asthma.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gisèle Bolduc
gisele.bolduc@adm.inrs.ca
418-654-2501
INRS

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Neuron
Researchers track down cause of eye mobility disorder
In a paper published in the April 16 print issue of the journal Neuron, University of Iowa researchers Bernd Fritzsch and Jeremy Duncan and their colleagues at Harvard Medical School, along with investigator and corresponding author Elizabeth Engle, describe how their studies on mutated mice mimic human mutations.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steve Kehoe
steve-kehoe@uowa.edu
319-335-1050
University of Iowa

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Neuron
Mutant protein in muscle linked to neuromuscular disorder
Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. In a new study published in the April 16, 2014, online issue of Neuron, a team of scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say novel mouse studies indicate that mutant protein levels in muscle cells are fundamentally involved in SBMA, suggesting an alternative and promising new avenue of treatment.
National Institutes of Health, Muscular Dystrophy Association, Ludwig Institute

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
NeuroImage
How kids' brain structures grow as memory develops
Our ability to store memories improves during childhood, associated with structural changes in the hippocampus and its connections with prefrontal and parietal cortices. New research from UC Davis is exploring how these brain regions develop at this crucial time. Eventually, that could give insights into disorders that typically emerge in the transition into and during adolescence and affect memory, such as schizophrenia and depression.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Cell
Vanderbilt researchers discover how intestinal cells build nutrient-absorbing surface
The 'brush border' -- a densely packed array of finger-like projections called microvilli -- covers the surfaces of the cells that line our intestines. Vanderbilt University researchers have now discovered how intestinal cells build this specialized structure, which is critical for absorbing nutrients and defending against pathogens. The findings, published April 10 in Cell, reveal a role for adhesion molecules in brush border assembly and increase our understanding of intestinal pathologies associated with inherited and infectious diseases.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Vanderbilt Innovation and Discovery in Engineering And Science award

Contact: Leigh MacMillan
leigh.macmillan@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Neuron
Cancer drugs block dementia-linked brain inflammation, UCI study finds
A class of drugs developed to treat immune-related conditions and cancer -- including one currently in clinical trials for glioblastoma and other tumors -- eliminates neural inflammation associated with dementia-linked diseases and brain injuries, according to UC Irvine researchers.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders & Stroke

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Scientists awarded $2 million to study improvements in anti-diabetic drug design
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded $2.1 million from the National Institutes of Health to study the therapeutic potential of safer and more effective alternatives to the current crop of anti-diabetic drugs, which have been limited in their use due to side effects including bone loss and congestive heart failure.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Clinical Infectious Diseases
HIV+ women respond well to HPV vaccine
A three-nation clinical trial found that a vaccine can safely help the vast majority of HIV-positive women produce antibodies against the cancer-causing human papillomavirus, even if their immune system is weak and even if they've had some prior HPV exposure.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Genome Research
Research uncovers DNA looping damage tied to HPV cancer
Certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) are known to cause about five percent of all cancer cases, yet all the mechanisms aren't completely understood. Now, researchers, led by The Ohio State University's David Symer, M.D., Ph.D., have leveraged Ohio Supercomputer Center resources and whole-genome sequencing to identify a new way that HPV might spark cancer development -- by disrupting the human DNA sequence with repeating loops when HPV is inserted into host-cell DNA as it replicates.
NIH/National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Research

Contact: Mr. Jamie Abel
jabel@oh-tech.org
614-292-6495
Ohio Supercomputer Center

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Journal of Immunology
Progress in understanding immune response in severe schistosomiasis
Researchers at Tufts University have uncovered a mechanism that may help explain the severe forms of schistosomiasis, or snail fever, which is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. The study in mice, published online this week in The Journal of Immunology, may also offer targets for intervention and amelioration of the disease.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/Office of the Director, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, National Research Foundation of Korea-Global Research Network

Contact: Siobhan Gallagher
siobhan.gallagher@tufts.edu
617-636-6586
Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Researchers see hospitalization records as additional tool
By comparing hospitalization records from Massachusetts hospitals with data reported to local boards of health found a more accurate way to monitor how well communities track disease outbreaks.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Alex Reid
alexander.reid@tufts.edu
617-627-4173
Tufts University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Menopause
Low vitamin D may not be a culprit in menopause symptoms
A new study from the Women's Health Initiative shows no significant connection between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms. The study was published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Jennifer Bahun
jbahun@fallscommunications.com
216-472-6678
The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Nature
Scientists re-define what's healthy in newest analysis for Human Microbiome Project
As scientists catalog the trillions of bacteria found in the human body, a new look by the University of Michigan shows wide variation in the types of bacteria found in healthy people.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Shantell M. Kirkendoll
smkirk@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Research may help doctors predict who gets long-term complications from Lyme disease
A team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins and Stanford University researchers has laid the groundwork for understanding how variations in immune responses to Lyme disease can contribute to the many different outcomes of this bacterial infection seen in individual patients. A report on the work appears online April 16 in PLOS One.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Showing releases 3426-3450 out of 3608.

<< < 133 | 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 139 | 140 | 141 | 142 > >>

     
   

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