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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3451-3475 out of 3567.

<< < 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 139 | 140 | 141 | 142 | 143 > >>

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Massachusetts' fire-safe cigarette law appears to decrease likelihood of residential fires
A six-year-old Massachusetts law requiring that only "fire-safe" cigarettes be sold in the state appears to decrease the likelihood of unintentional residential fires caused by cigarettes by 28 percent, according to a new study by Harvard School of Public Health researchers.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
Cell Reports
Protein switch dictates cellular fate: stem cell or neuron
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that a well-known protein has a new function: It acts in a biological circuit to determine whether an immature neural cell remains in a stem-like state or proceeds to become a functional neuron.
National Institutes of Health, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
International Stroke Conference
Moderate exercise cuts women's stroke risk, helps offset increase risk from hormone thep
Moderate exercise like brisk walking may cut women's stroke risk 20 percent. Moderate exercise also helps offset some of the increased stroke risk in women taking postmenopausal hormone therapy.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and others

Contact: Carrie Thacker
carrie.thacker@heart.org
214-706-1665
American Heart Association

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
International Stroke Conference
Blood clot risk remains higher than normal for at least 12 weeks after women deliver babies
Risk of a blood clot is higher than normal for at least 12 weeks after a woman delivers a baby -- twice as long as previously recognized.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Carrie Thacker
carrie.thacker@heart.org
214-706-1665
American Heart Association

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
International Stroke Conference
Common infections may increase risk for memory decline
Exposure to common infections is linked to problems with memory and cognitive skills. The cognitive decline may be evident even when the infection is not.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Carrie Thacker
carrie.thacker@heart.org
214-706-1665
American Heart Association

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Prenatal vitamin A deficiency tied to postnatal asthma
Researchers have found the first direct evidence of a link between prenatal vitamin A deficiency and postnatal airway hyperresponsiveness, a hallmark of asthma. The study, conducted in mice, shows that short-term deficit of this essential vitamin while the lung is forming can cause profound changes in the smooth muscle that surrounds the airways, causing the adult lungs to respond to environmental or pharmacological stimuli with excessive narrowing of airways. The findings were published online in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
BMC Evolutionary Biology
Solving an evolutionary puzzle
For four decades, waste from nearby manufacturing plants flowed into the waters of New Bedford Harbor -- an 18,000-acre estuary and busy seaport. The harbor, which is contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and heavy metals, is one of the EPA's largest Superfund cleanup sites. It's also the site of an evolutionary puzzle that researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and their colleagues have been working to solve.
NIH/National Insitute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Popular disinfectants do not kill HPV
Commonly used disinfectants do not kill human papillomavirus (HPV) that makes possible non-sexual transmission of the virus, thus creating a need for hospital policy changes, according to researchers from Penn State College of Medicine and Brigham Young University.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Brigham Young University

Contact: Matthew Solovey
msolovey@hmc.psu.edu
717-531-8606
Penn State

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
Journal of Chromotography B
Earwax: A new frontier of human odor information
Scientists from the Monell Center have used analytical organic chemistry to identify the presence of odor-producing chemical compounds in human earwax. Further, they found that the amounts of these compounds differ between individuals of East Asian origin and Caucasians. The findings suggest that human earwax, an easily obtained bodily secretion, could be an overlooked source of personal information.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, US Army Research Office

Contact: Leslie Stein
stein@monell.org
267-519-4707
Monell Chemical Senses Center

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
Nature
U-M scientists & colleagues investigate the fiber of our being
New research begins to uncover how our gut bacteria metabolize the complex dietary carbohydrates found in fruits and vegetables.
National Institutes of Health, Global Probiotics Council

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Scientists discover a new pathway for fear deep within the brain
Fear is primal. In the wild, it serves as a protective mechanism, but for humans, fear is more complex. A normal amount keeps us safe. But too much fear, like PTSD, can prevent people from living healthy lives. Researchers are working to understand how the brain translates fear into action. Today, CSHL scientists announce the discovery of a new neural circuit that links the site of fear memory with a brain area that controls behavior.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jaclyn Jansen
jjansen@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
PLOS ONE
Many stroke patients on 'clot-busting' tPA may not need long stays in the ICU
A Johns Hopkins study of patients with ischemic stroke suggests that many of those who receive prompt hospital treatment with "clot-busting" tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) therapy can avoid lengthy, restrictive monitoring in an intensive care unit (ICU).
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
International Stroke Conference
Stroke
Use of mortality as measure of stroke care questioned
A new study disputes the effectiveness of mortality as a measure of the quality of care provided by hospitals to stroke patients. The paper found that use of do-not-resuscitate orders differ widely between hospitals and that this variation can significantly skew a hospital's quality "ranking" based on mortality.
Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Mark Michaud
mark_michaud@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-4790
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
International Stroke Conference
Sleep apnea common among stroke-related brainstem injuries
Stroke damage to the brainstem is associated with the presence and severity of sleep apnea.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Astle
karen.astle@heart.org
214-706-1392
American Heart Association

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
International Stroke Conference
Common infections linked to stroke in children; vaccines may reduce risk
Common infections are associated with a significantly greater risk of stroke in children. Recommended vaccinations may help decrease the risk of stroke in children.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Astle
karen.astle@heart.org
214-706-1392
American Heart Association

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Nature
Researchers find source of new lineage of immune cells
The elusive progenitor cells that give rise to innate lymphoid cells -- a recently discovered group of infection-fighting white blood cells -- have been identified in fetal liver and adult bone marrow of mice.
National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Circulation
New imaging technique can diagnose common heart condition
A new imaging technique for measuring blood flow in the heart and vessels can diagnose a common congenital heart abnormality, bicuspid aortic valve, and may lead to better prediction of complications. The study revealed a previously unknown relationship between heart valve abnormalities, blood flow changes in the heart and aortic disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UNC study reveals potential route to bladder cancer diagnostics, treatments
UNC School of Medicine researchers conducted a genetic analysis of invasive bladder cancer tumors to discover that the disease shares genetic similarities with two forms of breast cancer.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: William Davis
william_davis@med.unc.edu
919-966-5906
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Penn Medicine: Cognitive development 'growth charts' may help diagnose and treat psychosis-risk kids
Penn Medicine researchers have developed a better way to assess and diagnose psychosis in young children. By "growth charting" cognitive development alongside the presentation of psychotic symptoms, they have demonstrated that the most significant lags in cognitive development correlate with the most severe cases of psychosis. Their findings are published online this month in JAMA Psychiatry.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lee-Ann Landis Donegan
leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5660
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
New evidence shows how chronic stress predisposes brain to mental disorders
UC Berkeley biologist Daniela Kaufer and colleagues have shown in rats that chronic stress makes stem cells in the brain produce more myelin-producing cells and fewer neurons, possibly affecting the speed of connections between cells as well as memory and learning. This could explain why stress leads to mental illness, such as PTSD, anxiety and mood disorders, later in life.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Leukemia
New target isolated for leukemia drug development
The protein WTAP and its relationship to Heat shock protein 90 are two discoveries at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio that open the door to developing more effective therapies in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.
Castella Endowment for Aging Research; NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Hyundai Hope on Wheels

Contact: Elizabeth Allen
allenea@uthscsa.edu
210-450-2020
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
FASEB Journal
Nanoparticles treat muscular dystrophy in mice
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have demonstrated a new approach to treating muscular dystrophy. Mice with a form of this muscle-weakening disease showed improved strength and heart function when treated with nanoparticles loaded with rapamycin, an immunosuppressive drug recently found to improve recycling of cellular waste.
National Institutes of Health, Muscular Dystrophy Association, American Heart Association

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Journal of Adolescent Health
Data on today's youth reveal childhood clues for later risk of STDs
Here's yet another reason to focus on kids' early years. Children who grow up in well-managed households, enjoy school, and have friends who stay out of trouble report fewer sexually transmitted diseases in young adulthood, according to a new analysis.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Contact: Molly McElroy
mollywmc@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Study: Resilience in parents of children undergoing stem cell transplant
After a child's stem cell transplant, parents feel increased distress at the time of the procedure, but eventually recover to normal levels of adjustment.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Garth Sundem
garth.sundem@ucdenver.edu
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Behavior Therapy
RI Hospital: Cognitive behavioral therapy benefits patients with body dysmorphic disorder
In a recent study, researchers at Rhode Island Hospital found significant benefits of cognitive behavioral therapy as a treatment modality for patients with Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). BDD is a common, often severe, and under-recognized body image disorder that affects an estimated 1.7 percent to 2.4 percent of the population. This study demonstrated significant improvement in patients' BDD symptoms and level of disability, as well as high levels of patient satisfaction with the treatment.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Ellen Slingsby
eslingsby@lifespan.org
401-444-6421
Lifespan

Showing releases 3451-3475 out of 3567.

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