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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 3451-3475 out of 3498.

<< < 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 139 | 140 > >>

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
UCSF awarded $20 million federal grant on tobacco regulatory science
UC San Francisco will receive a five-year, $20 million grant as part of a first-of-its-kind tobacco science regulatory program by the US Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health.
US Food and Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
elizabeth.fernandez@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
Mine metals at Maine Superfund site causing widespread contamination
Toxic metals from the only open pit mine in an estuary system in the United States are widespread in nearby sediment, water and fish and may be affecting marine and coastal animals that feed on them beyond the mine site, a new Dartmouth study finds.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Cancer Causes & Control
Moffitt Cancer Center launches prostate cancer study focused on black men
Prostate cancer kills more African-American and black men than any other group. With the lack of cancer research targeting this population in mind, Moffitt has launched a clinical trial using a botanical agent, isoflavones, on African-American and black men with prostate cancer. The trial is aimed at determining the safety, effectiveness and mechanism by which isoflavones can better reduce the risk of prostate cancer in African-American and black men.
US Department of Defense Prostate Cancer Research Program, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Polacek
kim.polacek@moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Annals of Neurology
Could dog food additive prevent disabling chemotherapy side effect?
Working with cells in test tubes and in mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins have discovered that a chemical commonly used as a dog food preservative may prevent the kind of painful nerve damage found in the hands and feet of four out of five cancer patients taking the chemotherapy drug Taxol.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Johns Hopkins Brain Science Institute

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Disarming HIV with a 'pop'
A team of Drexel University researchers is trying to get one step ahead of the virus with a microbicide they've created that can trick HIV into "popping" itself into oblivion.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Britt Faulstick
bef29@drexel.edu
215-895-2617
Drexel University

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
School of public health gets $19 million grant for tobacco research
In what is the largest grant in Georgia State University history, the university's School of Public Health and its partners will receive $19 million over five years from the US Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health to establish one of 14 Tobacco Centers of Regulatory Science.
US Food and Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Frances Marine
francesmarine@gsu.edu
404-413-1504
Georgia State University

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
UNC partners with FDA, NIH to create Tobacco Centers of Regulatory Science
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill received two separate grants from the US Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health today as part of an on-going interagency partnership. UNC will house two of 14 Tobacco Centers of Regulatory Science, which are receiving a total of up to $53 million for tobacco-related research in fiscal year 2013.
US Food and Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Hughes
tahughes@unch.unc.edu
919-966-6047
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Nature Communications
Researchers tease apart workings of a common gene
Researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College have discovered why a tiny alteration in a brain gene, found in 20 percent of the population, contributes to the risk for anxiety, depression and memory loss.
National Institutes of Health, Human Frontier Science Program

Contact: Sarah Smith
sas2072@med.cornell.edu
646-317-7401
Weill Cornell Medical College

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
UTHealth awarded $20 million to launch Tobacco Regulatory Science Center
The University of Texas School of Public Health has received $20 million in funding from the United States Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health today as part of an ongoing interagency partnership.
National Institutes of Health, Food and Drug Administration

Contact: Stephanie Logue
stephanie.d.logue@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3307
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Cell Reports
Global analysis reveals new insights into the ribosome -- with important implications for disease
In a first-of-its-kind study that broadly examines the composition of the riboproteome, a scientific team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reveals previously unappreciated components of the ribosome, uncovering a large and dynamic structure that, among other things, can be altered in cancer.
National Institutes of Health, German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
American Journal of Epidemiology
Older adults live longer with a few extra pounds -- if they don't add more
Some overweight older adults don't need to lose weight to extend their lives, but they could risk an earlier death if they pack on more pounds.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Hui Zheng
Zheng.64@sociology.osu.edu
614-688-8348
Ohio State University

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Structure
Protein 'motif' crucial to telomerase activity, Wistar researchers say
In an effort to understand and control telomerase activity, researchers at the Wistar Institute have discovered a protein "motif," named TFLY, which is crucial to the function of telomerase. Altering this motif disrupts telomerase function, they found, a fact that they believe will help them in their efforts to identify inhibitors of telomerase with potential cancer therapeutic properties.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Greg Lester
glester@wistar.org
215-898-3943
The Wistar Institute

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Cell Reports
Cutting off all points of escape for melanoma cells
Despite the success of recent melanoma therapies, advanced cancers eventually evolve resistance to drugs. Wistar researchers report on the mechanics by which melanoma can evolve resistance to a powerful combination of drugs -- BRAF and MEK inhibitors. Their studies also uncovered a new potential target for melanoma therapy, a protein called S6K. Additionally, early studies in a laboratory model for melanoma show that a triple combination of drug inhibitors halted the growth of resistant tumors.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, CURE Program of the Pennsylvania Department of Health, and others

Contact: Greg Lester
glester@wistar.org
215-898-3943
The Wistar Institute

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Cell Reports
New models of drug-resistant breast cancer hint at better treatments
Breast cancer that spreads to other organs is extremely difficult to treat. Doctors can buy patients time, but a cure remains elusive. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that human breast tumors transplanted into mice are excellent models of metastatic cancer and could be valuable tools in the search for better treatments.
Susan G. Komen for the Cure, National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, The Cancer Genome Atlas, Breast Cancer Research Foundation

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
48th Annual Meeting and Course of the Scoliosis Research Society
New England Journal of Medicine
UI researchers: Bracing is effective in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis
A multi-center study led by University of Iowa researchers to determine whether wearing back braces would prevent the need for spinal correction surgery in children with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis was cut short when early results were overwhelmingly in favor of bracing.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Molly Rossiter
molly-rossiter@uiowa.edu
319-356-7124
University of Iowa Health Care

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
Science
Circadian clock is key to firing up cell's furnace
Each of our cells has an energy furnace, and it is called a mitochondrion. A Northwestern University-led research team now has identified a new mode of timekeeping that involves priming the cell's furnace to properly use stored fuel when we are not eating. The interdisciplinary team has identified the "match" and "flint" responsible for lighting this tiny furnace. And the match is only available when the circadian clock says so, underscoring the importance of the biological timing system to metabolism.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Endocrine Society

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 19-Sep-2013
PLOS Genetics
Study provides big-picture view of how cancer cells are supported by normal cells in and near tumors
Investigators at CSHL report important progress in research aimed at finding ways to fight cancer by targeting the local environment in which tumors grow and from which they draw sustenance. It's part of the first systematic effort to catalog the repertoire of interactions between cancer cells and their environment.
National Institutes of Health, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Long Island 2 Day Walk

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
University of Maryland researchers studying vaccine to prevent potential bird flu pandemic
Scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Center for Vaccine Development are part of nationwide vaccine research aimed at protecting adults from a new and virulent strain of avian influenza virus. The virus, called H7N9 influenza virus, emerged in China last spring. The study, sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, will help prepare for the possibility of a global pandemic.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Bill Seiler
bseiler@umm.edu
410-328-8919
University of Maryland Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
Obesity
New research supports intentional weight loss for older adults
New research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center shows that physical activity and weight loss conducted together for older, overweight and obese adults results in improved body composition, translating into lower cardiovascular disease risk and improved mobility.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute for Aging, National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Bonnie Davis
bdavis@wakehealth.edu
336-716-4977
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New role for protein family could provide path to how crop traits are modified
Pioneering new research from a team of Indiana University Bloomington biologists has shown for the first time that a protein which has been long known to be critical for the initiation of protein synthesis in all organisms can also play a role in the regulation of gene expression in some bacteria, and probably land plants as well.
National Science Foundation, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Stephen Chaplin
stjchap@iu.edu
812-856-1896
Indiana University

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Tiny bottles and melting corks: Temperature regulates new delivery system for drugs and fragrances
Microscopic, bottle-like structures with corks that melt at precisely-controlled temperatures could potentially release drugs inside the body or fragrances onto the skin, according to a recently published study.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Korean Ministry of Education and Science

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
School of Public Health receives $390,000 grant to study alcohol use among youth acquiring HIV
Dr. Monica Swahn, professor in the School of Public Health and associate vice president for research at Georgia State University, has received a two-year, $390,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the role of alcohol marketing and early alcohol use among African youth acquiring HIV.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Frances Marine
francesmarine@gsu.edu
404-413-1504
Georgia State University

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
Nature Communications
Scientists develop a new way to identify good fat
When it comes to fat, you want the brown type and not so much of the white variety because brown fat burns energy to keep you warm and metabolically active, while white fat stores excess energy around your waist, causing health problems. Researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School are studying brown fat with a goal of fighting obesity.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Cahill
Robert.Cahill@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3030
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
ACS Chemical Biology
Researchers demonstrate a new strategy to stop the TB bacterium
Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis may have an Achilles' heel: it needs a particular enzyme to survive. Inhibiting that enzyme's function, researchers have shown, will kill the bacteria, pointing toward a design strategy for new TB drugs.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 18-Sep-2013
NIH prepares by funding new bird flu vaccine studies
Group Health Research Institute scientists are preparing for the potential pandemic spread of a new bird flu strain that caused severe disease in China earlier this year, joining seven other Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units funded by the National Institutes of Health to test vaccines to protect against the illness in adults. "Influenza viruses are constantly changing," said Lisa Jackson, M.D., M.P.H., a senior investigator at Group Health Research Institute.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rebecca Hughes
hughes.r@ghc.org
206-287-2055
Group Health Research Institute

Showing releases 3451-3475 out of 3498.

<< < 134 | 135 | 136 | 137 | 138 | 139 | 140 > >>

     
   

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