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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 3460.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Science
Unprecedented detail of intact neuronal receptor offers blueprint for drug developers
Scientists succeeded in obtaining an unprecedented view of a type of brain-cell receptor that is implicated in a range of neurological illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, schizophrenia, autism, and ischemic injuries associated with stroke.
US Department of Energy, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors
Study finds less domestic violence among married couples who smoke pot
New research findings from a study of 634 couples found that the more often they smoked marijuana, the less likely they were to engage in domestic violence.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Cathy Wilde
cwilde@ria.buffalo.edu
716-887-3365
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Hebew SeniorLife researcher receives $4.5 million grant to test videos for advance directives
A new NIH-funded project will assess whether videos can help nursing home residents, family members and staff have the difficult but important conversations about advanced directives for care.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jennifer Davis
jdavis@hsl.harvard.edu
617-363-8282
Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
National Science Review
Bombarded by explosive waves of information, scientists review new ways to process and analyze Big Data
Big Data presents information-bombarded society with the potential for new levels of scientific discovery, but also delivers challenges to data scientists. While holding promise to detect intricate population patterns, Big Data's massive sample size and high dimensionality introduce unique hurdles to processing this information. Scientists at Princeton University and at Johns Hopkins state that to meet these challenges, it is urgent to develop more robust statistical and computational methods, and a more advanced computing architecture.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jianqing Fan
jqfan@princeton.edu
Science China Press

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
JAMA
Collaborative care improves depression in teens
How best to care for the many adolescents who have depression? In a collaborative care intervention, a care manager continually reached out to teens -- delivering and following up on treatment in a primary-care setting. Depression outcomes after a year were significantly better with this approach than with usual care, according to a JAMA report of a randomized controlled trial from Seattle Children's, Group Health, and the University of Washington.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Rose Ibarra (Egge)
rose.ibarra@seattlechildrens.org
206-987-7334
Group Health Research Institute

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
New estrogen-based compound suppresses binge-like eating behavior in female mice
Researchers at the USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital found that the hormone estrogen can specifically trigger brain serotonin neurons to inhibit binge eating in female mice in a report today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, American Diabetes Association

Contact: Glenna Picton
picton@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Alcoholics have an abnormal CD8 T cell response to the influenza virus
Chronic drinking is associated with an increased incidence and severity of respiratory infections. A reduced CD8 T cell response was previously implicated in increased disease severity due to influenza virus infections. New rodent findings indicate that only some CD8 T cell functions are damaged while others remain intact.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin L. Legge
kevin-legge@uiowa.edu
319-335-6744
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Prenatal alcohol exposure is associated with later excess weight/obesity during adolescence
Growth deficiency is a defining feature of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). A new study has found that rates of excess weight/obesity are elevated in adolescents with partial fetal alcohol syndrome (pFAS). Females with FASD may be at a greater risk for excess weight/obesity than males during adolescence.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeffrey R. Wozniak, Ph.D.
jwozniak@umn.edu
612-273-9741
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
ChemBioChem
Cancer-fighting drugs might also stop malaria early
Scientists searching for new drugs for malaria have identified a number of compounds -- some of which are in clinical trials to treat cancer -- that could lead to new ways to fight the disease. Researchers identified 31 enzyme-blocking molecules, called protein kinase inhibitors, that curb malaria before symptoms start. By focusing on treatments that act early, the researchers hope to give drug-resistant strains less time to spread.
Duke University, Harvard Medical School, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Endocrinology
Exposure to toxins makes great granddaughters more susceptible to stress
According to a new study by researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and Washington State University, male and female rats are affected differently by ancestral exposure to a common fungicide, vinclozolin. Female rats whose great grandparents were exposed to vinclozolin become much more vulnerable to stress, becoming more anxious and preferring the company of novel females to familiar females.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias
New coping strategy for the memory impaired and their caregivers
Mindfulness training for individuals with early-stage dementia and their caregivers together in the same class was beneficial for both groups, easing depression and improving sleep and quality of life. Just eight sessions of training made a positive difference, resulting in more joy, less worry.
NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tilted acoustic tweezers separate cells gently
Precise, gentle and efficient cell separation from a device the size of a cell phone may be possible thanks to tilt-angle standing surface acoustic waves, according to a team of engineers.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Virus, zebrafish enable scientists to map the living brain
A virus and a zebrafish are helping scientists map the living brain. 'You can kinda draw a diagram and see how cells within it are connected in a functioning brain,' said Dr. Albert Pan, neuroscientist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University. 'This will help us see how wiring is laid and how it functions.'
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Journal of Family Psychology
Expectant parents' play with doll predicts later parenting behavior
Having expectant parents role-play interacting with an infant using a doll can help predict which couples may be headed for co-parenting conflicts when their baby arrives.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan
schoppe-sullivan.1@osu.edu
614-688-3437
Ohio State University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Journal of Cell Biology
Scientists uncover navigation system used by cancer, nerve cells
A study in C. elegans worms identifies a 'roving detection system' on the surface of worm cells that may point to new ways of treating diseases like cancer, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The study sheds light on the molecular mechanisms that enable both normal and cancerous cells to break through normal tissue boundaries and burrow into other tissues and organs.
National Institutes of Health, Pew Charitable Trusts

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Nursing home care improves with culture change
Nursing homes that invest in 'culture change' can develop a more residential and less hospital-like feel. Culture change also allows residents and front-line care workers more of a say in how homes operate. A new study finds that the practice produces important benefits in quality of care, but only when the changes are implemented extensively.
Retirement Research Association, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Study shows 25 percent fewer opioid-related deaths in states allowing medical marijuana
On average, states allowing the medical use of marijuana have lower rates of deaths resulting from opioid analgesic overdoses than states without such laws. A new multi-institutional study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine and led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, shows that on average, the 13 states allowing the use of medical marijuana had a 24.8 percent lower annual opioid overdose mortality rate after the laws were enacted than states without the laws.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katie Delach
katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5964
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Genome Medicine
Cancer leaves a common fingerprint on DNA
Regardless of their stage or type, cancers appear to share a telltale signature of widespread changes to the so-called epigenome, according to a team of researchers. In a study published online in Genome Medicine on Aug. 26, the investigators say they have found widespread and distinctive changes in a broad variety of cancers to chemical marks known as methyl groups attached to DNA, which help govern whether genes are turned 'on' or 'off.'
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
JAMA Neurology
Surgical complications of DBS no higher risk for older Parkinson's patients
Implantating deep brain stimulation devices poses no greater risk of complications to older patients than it does to younger patients with Parkinson's disease, researchers at Duke Medicine report.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
State medical marijuana laws linked to lower prescription overdose deaths
In states where it is legal to use medical marijuana to manage chronic pain and other conditions, the annual number of deaths from prescription drug overdose is 25 percent lower than in states where medical marijuana remains illegal, new research suggests.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Changes in the eye can predict changes in the brain
Researchers at the Gladstone Institutes and University of California, San Francisco have shown that a loss of cells in the retina is one of the earliest signs of frontotemporal dementia in people with a genetic risk for the disorder -- even before any changes appear in their behavior.
Consortium for Frontotemporal Dementia Research, Bluefield Project to Cure FTD, National Institutes of Health, UCSF Resource Allocation Program, UCSF Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Chartrand Foundation and Clinical & Science Translational Institute

Contact: Dana Smith
dana.smith@gladstone.ucsf.edu
415-734-2532
Gladstone Institutes

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Key to universal flu vaccine: Embrace the unfamiliar
Human volunteers immunized against the avian flu virus H5N1 readily developed antibodies against the stem region of the viral hemagglutinin protein. In contrast, those immunized with standard seasonal trivalent vaccines did not, instead developing most of their antibodies against the more variable head region.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 24-Aug-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Neuroscience and big data: How to find simplicity in the brain
Scientists can now monitor and record the activity of hundreds of neurons concurrently in the brain, and ongoing technology developments promise to increase this number. However, simply recording the neural activity does not automatically lead to a clearer understanding of how the brain works. Byron M. Yu and John P. Cunningham describe the scientific motivations for studying the activity of many neurons together, along with a class of machine learning algorithms for interpreting the activity.
Grossman Center for the Statistics of Mind, Simons Foundation, Gatsby Charitable Foundation, and the NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2014
Nature Neuroscience
'Haven't my neurons seen this before?'
The world grows increasingly more chaotic year after year, and our brains are constantly bombarded with images. A new study from Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, a joint project between Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh, reveals how neurons in the part of the brain responsible for recognizing objects respond to being shown a barrage of images. The study is published online by Nature Neuroscience.
NIH/National Eye Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Pennsylvania Department of Health/Commonwealth Universal Research Enhancement Program

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 24-Aug-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Driving brain rhythm makes mice more sensitive to touch
In a new study researchers show that they could make faint sensations more vivid by triggering a brain rhythm that appears to shift sensory attention. The study in mice, reported in Nature Neuroscience, provides the first direct evidence that the brain's 'gamma' rhythms have a causal role in processing the sense of touch.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Showing releases 51-75 out of 3460.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

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