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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 3540.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
High-quality hospitals deliver lowest-cost care for congenital heart surgery patients
US children's hospitals delivering the highest-quality care for children undergoing heart surgery, also appear to provide care most efficiently at a low cost, according to research led by the University of Michigan and presented Tuesday at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Chicago.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Mary Masson
mfmasson@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
UTHealth researchers to study probiotic's effect on deadly pre-term infant condition
Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston have received a $1.6 million grant for a preclinical study investigating whether a probiotic might be helpful in preventing a life-threatening condition in pre-term infants called necrotizing enterocolitis.
NIH/National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine

Contact: Hannah Rhodes
Hannah.C.Rasorrhodes@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3053
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Journal of Health and Social Behavior
Bad marriage, broken heart?
Older couples in a bad marriage -- particularly female spouses -- have a higher risk for heart disease than those in a good marriage, finds the first nationally representative study of its kind.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
Research shows why antidepressant may be effective in postpartum depression
An antidepressant commonly prescribed for women with postpartum depression may restore connections between cells in brain regions that are negatively affected by chronic stress during pregnancy, new research suggests.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Benedetta Leuner
Leuner.1@osu.edu
614-292-5218
Ohio State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
Of mice, not men
For more than a century, the laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) has stood in for humans in experiments ranging from deciphering disease and brain function to explaining social behaviors and the nature of obesity. The small rodent has proven to be an indispensable biological tool, the basis for decades of profound scientific discovery and medical progress.
National Institutes of Health, Spanish Plan Nacional, National Science Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-5232
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
Scientists map mouse genome's 'mission control centers'
When the mouse and human genomes were catalogued more than 10 years ago, an international team of researchers set out to understand and compare the 'mission control centers' found throughout the large stretches of DNA flanking the genes. Their long-awaited report suggests why studies in mice cannot always be reproduced in humans. Importantly, their work also sheds light on the function of DNA's regulatory regions, which are often to blame for common chronic human diseases.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Many older brains have plasticity, but in a different place
Brain scientists have long believed that older people have less of the neural flexibility, or plasticity, required to learn new things. A new study shows that older people learned a visual task just as well as younger ones, but the seniors who showed a strong degree of learning exhibited plasticity in a different part of the brain than younger learners did.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
Speedy heart transplant for kids better than waiting for perfect match
Survival is predicted to be higher for pediatric heart transplant candidates when the first suitable donor offer is accepted -- even if they have antibodies that may lead to organ rejection. Costs of care are lower for children who don't wait for an antibody-matched heart. Researchers say the decision to perform a heart transplant should not depend solely upon the patient's antibodies.
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bridgette McNeill
bridgette.mcneill@heart.org
214-706-1135
American Heart Association

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Penn-led team prevents memory problems caused by sleep deprivation
In a new study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, a team led by scientists from the University of Pennsylvania found that a particular set of cells in a small region of the brain are responsible for memory problems after sleep loss. By selectively increasing levels of a signaling molecule in these cells, the researchers prevented mice from having memory deficits.
Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, University Research Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
American Heart Association
American Journal of Cardiology
Vanderbilt study finds nationwide decline in one type of serious heart attack
The most emergent form of heart attacks is decreasing nationwide, but this declining incidence could affect emergency departments' quality and timeliness of care.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Jennifer Wetzel
Jennifer.wetzel@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Pain from rejection and physical pain may not be so similar after all
Over the last decade, neuroscientists have largely come to believe that physical pain and social pain are processed by the brain in the same way. But a new study led by the University of Colorado shows that the two kinds of pain actually use distinct neural circuits, a finding that could lead to more targeted treatments and a better understanding of how the two kinds of pain interact.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Choong-Wan Woo
Choongwan.Woo@colorado.edu
720-443-3640
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
The Anatomical Record
Were Neanderthals a sub-species of modern humans? New research says no
In an extensive, multi-institution study led by SUNY Downstate Medical Center, researchers have identified new evidence supporting the growing belief that Neanderthals were a distinct species separate from modern humans (Homo sapiens), and not a subspecies of modern humans.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Ron Najman
ron.najman@downstate.edu
718-270-2696
SUNY Downstate Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
International Journal of Obesity
Taking antibiotics during pregnancy increases risk for child becoming obese
A study just released by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that children who were exposed to antibiotics in the second or third trimester of pregnancy had a higher risk of childhood obesity at age 7. The research also showed that for mothers who delivered their babies by a cesarean section, whether elective or non-elective, there was a higher risk for obesity in their offspring.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, US Environmental Protection Agency, Educational Foundation of America, John and Wendy Neu Family Foundation, New York Community Trust, Trustees of the Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Fund

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Big data study identifies new potential target coating for drug-eluting stents
A new study has identified an FDA approved cancer drug, crizotinib, as a possible new coating for drug-eluting stents. Researchers found that crizotinib in mice helped prevent the narrowing of blood vessels after stenting without affecting the blood vessel lining. Results of this study were published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Judy Romero
jromero@crf.org
Cardiovascular Research Foundation

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Two sensors in one
MIT chemists have developed new nanoparticles that can simultaneously perform magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescent imaging in animals.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
The role DNA methylation plays in aging cells
Although every person's DNA remains the same throughout their lives, scientists know that it functions differently at different ages.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: Marguerite Beck
marbeck@wakehealth.edu
336-716-2415
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
New measurement of HDL cholesterol function provides information about cardiovascular risk
Groundbreaking research from UTSW shows that cholesterol efflux capacity -- cholesterol efflux -- appears to be a superior indicator of cardiovascular risk and a better target for therapeutic treatments than standard measurements of HDL.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Investigator Initiated Studies Program of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp

Contact: Cathy Frisinger
cathy.frisinger@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
New England Journal of Medicine
New treatment for Marfan syndrome shows promise
An investigational treatment for Marfan syndrome is as effective as the standard therapy at slowing enlargement of the aorta, the large artery of the heart that delivers blood to the body, new research shows. The findings indicate a second treatment option for Marfan patients, who are at high risk of sudden death from tears in the aorta.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, US Food and Drug Administration, Marfan Foundation, Merck & Co. Inc., Teva Canada Ltd.

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
PLOS Biology
Cells' natural response to chronic protein misfolding may do more harm than good
'Protein misfolding' diseases such as cystic fibrosis and Alzheimer's may be seriously exacerbated by the body's own response against that misfolding, according to a new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute.
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics, National Institutes of Health, WKZ Research Fund, NCFS HIT-CF program, American Health Assistance Foundation, Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council, Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Premature infants benefit from early sodium supplementation according to new research
Early sodium supplementation for very premature infants can enhance weight gain according to a recent study by researchers at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.
NIH/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Troy Petenbrink
media@nutritioncare.org
202-297-1703
American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.)

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Lancet
Paradox lost: Speedier heart attack treatment saves more lives after all, study suggests
A national effort to shave minutes off emergency heart attack treatment time has increased the chance that each patient will survive, a new study suggests. But yet the survival rate for all patients put together hasn't budged. It seems like a paradox. But wait, say the authors of the new report: The paradox vanishes with more detailed analysis of exactly who has been getting this treatment.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
High-fructose diet in adolescence may exacerbate depressive-like behavior
When animals consume a diet high in fructose throughout adolescence, it can worsen depressive- and anxiety-like behavior and alter how the brain responds to stress.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Seniors draw on extra brainpower for shopping
Holiday shopping can be mentally exhausting for anyone. But a new study finds that older adults seem to need extra brainpower to make shopping decisions -- especially ones that rely on memory. The Duke University study, appearing Nov. 19 in the Journal of Neuroscience, suggests that older shoppers draw on resources from an additional brain area to remember competing consumer products and choose the better one.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Childhood adversity hinders genetic protection against problem drinking in white men
The alcohol metabolizing gene ADH1B is strongly linked to risk for alcohol use disorders (AUDs). The His allele at ADHD1B-rs1229984 is considered protective against AUDs. Experiencing adverse events during childhood -- physical or sexual abuse or witnessing violence -- is a risk factor for AUDs. Research has found that under conditions of childhood adversity, the ADH1B His allele does not exert its protective effects against problem drinking in European-American men.
National Institutes of Health, Robert E. Leet and Clara Guthrie Patterson Trust, APA/Merck Early Academic Career Award Program, VA CT and Philadelphia VA Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Centers

Contact: Carolyn E. Sartor, Ph.D.
carolyn.sartor@yale.edu
203-937-3894
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Chronic alcohol intake can damage white matter pathways across the entire brain
Chronic misuse of alcohol results in measurable damage to the brain. A new study uses high-resolution structural magnetic resonance scans to compare the brains of individuals with a history of alcoholism versus those of healthy light drinkers. The abstinent alcoholics showed pronounced reductions in frontal and superior white matter tracts.
Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Catherine Brawn Fortier, Ph.D.
catherine_fortier@hms.harvard.edu
857-364-4361
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Showing releases 51-75 out of 3540.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

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