NIH Director Page NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIH Social Media and Outreach
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Videos
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3799.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Cell
An innovative algorithm is helping scientists decipher how drugs work inside the body
Researchers have developed a computer algorithm that is helping scientists see how drugs produce pharmacological effects inside the body.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lucky Tran
lucky.tran@columbia.edu
212-305-3689
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
MSU scientists set sights on glaucoma medication to treat TB
A new discovery by Michigan State University scientists suggests that a common medication used to treat glaucoma could also be used to treat tuberculosis, even the drug-resistant kind.
National Institutes of Health, MSU startup funds, AgBioResearch, Jean P. Schultz Biomedical Research Fund.

Contact: Sarina Gleason
sarina.gleason@cabs.msu.edu
517-355-9742
Michigan State University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
Building confidence helps people with MS have fuller lives, reports CWRU researcher
To help people with MS maintain autonomy and independence, a team of researchers set out to determine what factors prevented individuals from undertaking and enjoying the activities they believe are most important to live fulfilling lives.
National Multiple Sclerosis Society, NIH/National Institute of Nursing Research

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Psychology and Aging
College social life can predict well-being at midlife
It's well known that being socially connected promotes a person's overall and psychological health. A new study from the University of Rochester now shows that the quantity of social interactions a person has at 20 -- and the quality of social relationships that person has at age 30 -- can benefit her well-being later in life.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Monique Patenaude
monique.patenaude@rochester.edu
585-276-3693
University of Rochester

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Molecular Cell
New antibody specificity portal bolsters biomedical research reliability
Histone Antibody Specificity Database is a newly launched online portal that lets scientists find the right antibodies for their research with a much higher degree of confidence than ever before. Rather than relying on the claims of antibody manufacturers, the database is populated with validated test results, allowing researchers to access and compare real-world data and pick the most reliable antibody for each experiment. A paper published today in the journal Molecular Cell describes the database and the science behind it.
National Institutes of Health, W.M. Keck Foundation

Contact: Beth Hinshaw Hall
Beth.HinshawHall@vai.org
616-234-5519
Van Andel Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Psychoneuroendocrinology
Researchers: Body fat can send signals to brain, affecting stress response
The brain's effect on other parts of the body has been well established. Now, a group that includes two University of Florida Health researchers has found that it's a two-way street: Body fat can send a signal that affects the way the brain deals with stress and metabolism.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Doug Bennett
dougbennett@ufl.edu
352-273-5706
University of Florida

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Psychoneuroendocrinology
Researchers: Body fat can send signals to brain, affecting stress response
The brain's effect on other parts of the body has been well established. Now, a group that includes two University of Florida Health researchers has found that it's a two-way street: Body fat can send a signal that affects the way the brain deals with stress and metabolism.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Doug Bennett
dougbennett@ufl.edu
352-273-5706
University of Florida

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Dementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice
Study identifies challenges of delirium detection in older adults in emergency department
Researchers from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute have conducted what is believed to be the first study to interview providers to identify the barriers and possible catalysts to delirium detection in emergency care situations. An estimated one to two million older adults with delirium visit hospital emergency departments in the United States annually. Two-third of cases are unrecognized.
John A. Hartford Foundation and NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Nature Methods
Web app helps researchers explore cancer genetics
As gene sequencing has gotten faster and cheaper, clinicians and researchers are able to use genomic data to study, diagnose, and develop a course of treatment for a variety of individual cancers. MAGI, an open-source tool developed by Brown University researchers, lets users compare their data with enormous cancer genetics datasets.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
BIDMC research shows endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm is safe
A new study from researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center compared open surgical repair with a catheter-based procedure and found that the less invasive endovascular aortic repair has clear benefits for most patients.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Harvard-Longwood Research Training in Vascular Surgery, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kelly Lawman
klawman@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7305
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Moffitt researchers develop first genetic test to predict tumor sensitivity to radiation therapy
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have contributed to these advances by developing the first test that analyzes the sensitivity of tumors to radiation therapy. They discovered that colon cancer metastases have varying sensitivity to radiation therapy based on their anatomic location.
National Institutes of Health, US Army, Bankhead-Coley

Contact: Kim Polacek
Kim.Polacek@Moffitt.org
813-745-7408
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Brown Universtity begins study of early life chemical exposures
With more than $1.5 million from the National Institutes of Health over the next four years, Brown University epidemiologist Joseph Braun will study how exposure to three common chemicals during pregnancy and childhood affects brain development and the thyroid.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
mBio
It takes a village... to ward off dangerous infections? New microbiome research suggests so
Like a collection of ragtag villagers fighting off an invading army, the mix of bacteria that live in our guts may band together to keep dangerous infections from taking hold, new research suggests. But some 'villages' may succeed better than others at holding off the invasion, because of key differences in the kinds of bacteria that make up their feisty population.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Developmental Cell
Simple technology makes CRISPR gene editing cheaper
The CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing tool requires an RNA guide to precisely target a segment of DNA, where the Cas9 enzyme can either cut or latch on with a fluorescent probe. Creating guide RNAs is time consuming and expensive, however. UC Berkeley researchers have found a simple, cheap way to produce these guides, making it easy to produce thousands simultaneously, even turning an entire genome into a library of tens of thousands of guide RNAs.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Cell Stem Cell
Access denied: Leukemia thwarted by cutting off link to environmental support
A new study by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine reveals a protein's critical -- and previously unknown -- role in the development and progression of acute myeloid leukemia, a fast-growing and extremely difficult-to-treat blood cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Lymphoma and Leukemia Society

Contact: Bonnie Ward
bjward@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Molecular Cell
New antibody portal bolsters biomedical research reliability
The Histone Antibody Specificity Database is a newly launched online portal that lets scientists find the right antibodies for their research with a much higher degree of confidence than ever before.
National Institutes of Health, The W.M. Keck Foundation

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unchealth.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Molecular Cell
Simple flip of genetic switch determines aging or longevity in animals
When does aging really begin? Northwestern University scientists now have a molecular clue. In a study of the roundworm C. elegans, they found that adult cells abruptly begin their downhill slide when an animal reaches reproductive maturity. A genetic switch starts the aging process by turning off cell stress responses that protect the cell by keeping important proteins folded and functional. Germline stem cells throw the switch in early adulthood, after the animal starts to reproduce, ensuring its line will live on.
National Institutes of Health, Ellison Medical Foundation, Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Science
Researchers find promising treatment for devastating genetic disorder
A multi-institutional team of researchers has identified an apparently successful treatment for a genetic immune disorder that causes a multitude of health problems -- ranging from infections, diabetes, lung disease and the body's immune system attacking and damaging healthy tissues.
American Society of Hematology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center Gap Award, Cincinnati Children's/Immunobiology, Cincinnati Children's/Bone Marrow Transplantation & Immune Deficiency, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jim Feuer
jim.feuer@cchmc.org
513-636-4656
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Cell
Genetically distinct cells reveal nature's strategy for avoiding pregnancy complications
Researchers add a new twist to the more than century old biological principles of Mendelian inheritance -- describing a small group of cells in pregnant mothers that promote genetic fitness and multi-generational reproductive health.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Contact: Jim Feuer
jim.feuer@cchmc.org
513-636-4656
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
Science
UT Dallas nanotechnology research leads to super-elastic conducting fibers
A research team based at the University of Texas at Dallas has made electrically conducting fibers that can be reversibly stretched to over 14 times their initial length and whose electrical conductivity increases 200-fold when stretched. In a study published in the July 24 issue of the journal Science, the scientists describe how they constructed the fibers by wrapping electrically conductive sheets of carbon nanotubes to form a jelly-roll-like sheath around a long rubber core.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Robert A. Welch Foundation, US Army, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Amanda Siegfried
amanda.siegfried@utdallas.edu
972-883-4335
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Journal of Pediatrics
New analysis points the way to earlier diagnosis of chest tumors
Scientists found two previously overlooked clues in the health records of 131 children and teens with chest masses. Patients with enlarged lymph nodes in the neck and low levels of certain white blood cells were more likely to have cancer. Masses located in front of the heart were also more likely to be malignant. The results were published in the Journal of Pediatrics.
National Institutes of Health, American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities,

Contact: Frannie Marmorstein
frannie.marmorstein@stjude.org
901-595-0221
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Critical Care Medicine
Coping by avoidance in making decisions for relatives in ICU may lead to PTSD
Family members who make major medical decisions for relatives in an intensive care unit may suffer posttraumatic stress disorder if they cope by avoiding the situation, according to a new study by scientists at Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Preserving photoreceptor cells following retinal injury
Mass. Eye and Ear/HMS Researchers discovered that there was a significant increase in the immune system's 'alternative complement pathway' following retinal detachment and that this pathway facilitated early photoreceptor cell death after injury. Additionally, by blocking the alternative complement pathway, through both genetic and pharmacologic means, photoreceptors were protected from cell death.
NIH/National Eye Institute, Research to Prevent Blindness, Harvard Medical School Department of Ophthalmology

Contact: Joseph O'Shea
joseph_oshea@meei.harvard.edu
617-573-3341
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Diagnostic test developed for enterovirus D68
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a diagnostic test to quickly detect enterovirus D68, a respiratory virus that caused unusually severe illness in children last year. The outbreak caused infections at an unprecedented rate, with over 1,000 confirmed cases and 14 reported deaths nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 22-Jul-2015
MD Anderson named as 1 of 2 Genome Characterization Centers
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has been named a site for one of two new Genome Characterization Centers funded through the National Cancer Institute.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Ron Gilmore
rlgilmore1@mdanderson.org
713-745-1898
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3799.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2015 by AAAS, the science society.