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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3716.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 19-May-2015
169th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
How does the brain respond to hearing loss?
Researchers at the University of Colorado suggest that the portion of the brain devoted to hearing can become reorganized even with early-stage hearing loss, and may play a role in cognitive decline. They have applied fundamental principles of neuroplasticity, the ability of the brain to forge new connections, to determine the ways it adapts to hearing loss, as well as the consequences of those changes, and their findings will be presented at ASA's 169th meeting.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
Acoustical Society of America

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Microclinics help keep Kenyan HIV patients in care
A team led by researchers from UC San Francisco, Organic Health Response, and Microclinic International is reporting results of a study that showed significant benefits of microclinics -- an innovative intervention that mobilized rural Kenyan HIV patients' informal social networks to support their staying in care.
Tides Foundation, Craigslist Foundation, Mulago Foundation, Rise Up Foundation, Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, Segal Family Foundation, NIH/National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and others

Contact: Jeff Sheehy
jeff.sheehy@ucsf.edu
415-845-1132
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
Maternal obesity compromises babies' immune system at time of birth
Maternal obesity is linked to several adverse health outcomes for the infant that can persist into adulthood. But when does the immune system of babies born to obese mothers get compromised? Very early in the baby's life, according to a UC Riverside-led study. The research team analyzed umbilical cord blood samples of infants born to lean, overweight and obese mothers, and found that pre-pregnancy maternal weight has a significant impact on the neonate's immune system.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@iucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 18-May-2015
UTHealth establishes biosafety and infectious disease training initiative
Researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health have received a $100,000 supplemental grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to establish a Biosafety and Infectious Disease Training Initiative.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Hannah Rhodes
Hannah.C.Rasorrhodes@uth.tmc.edu
713-500-3053
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Cell Metabolism
UC-led obesity research finds leptin hormone isn't the overeating culprit
For years, scientists have pointed to leptin resistance as a possible cause of obesity. Research led by investigators at the University of Cincinnati Metabolic Diseases Institute, however, found that leptin action isn't the culprit.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Angela Koenig
angela.koenig@uc.edu
513-558-4625
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Forecasting future infectious disease outbreaks
Machine learning can pinpoint rodent species that harbor diseases and geographic hotspots vulnerable to new parasites and pathogens. So reports a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences led by Barbara A. Han, a disease ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lori Quillen
quillenl@caryinstitute.org
845-677-7600 x121
Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Adolescents, drugs and dancing
A new NYU study is the first to examine the sociodemographic correlates of rave attendance and relationships between rave attendance and recent (12-month) use of various drugs in a representative US sample of high school seniors.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature Neuroscience
Researchers find brain area that integrates speech's rhythms
A team led by scientists at Duke University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has discovered an area of the brain that is sensitive to the timing of speech. The new study advances our understanding of how humans make sense of spoken language.
National Institutes of Health, GRAMMY Foundation, James S. McDonnell Foundation

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 18-May-2015
PLOS ONE
Pactamycin analogs offer new, gentler approach to cancer treatment
Researchers are pursuing a new concept in treatment of cancer, by using two promising 'analogs' of an old compound that was once studied as a potent anti-tumor agent, but long ago abandoned because it was too toxic. The idea is not to kill cancer cells, but rather to put them to sleep - lessening problems with resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, and also the side effects of chemotherapy.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Arup Indra
arup.indra@oregonstate.edu
541-737-5775
Oregon State University

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature Materials
Bigger capsules may be long-sought key for transplanting islet cells
Changing the size of cell-carrying spheres may surmount the difficulties that have bedeviled diabetes researchers trying to ferry insulin-producing islet cells into hosts as a way to treat type 1 diabetes. New findings published in the journal Nature Materials suggest that for the spherical capsules, bigger may be better.
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Koch Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Tayebati Family Foundation

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Neuron
UCI neurobiologists restore youthful vigor to adult brains
They say you can't teach an old dog new tricks. The same can be said of the adult brain. Its connections are hard to change, while in children, novel experiences rapidly mold new connections during critical periods of brain development.
National Institutes of Health, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Searle Scholars, Klingenstein Fellowship

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature Materials
Designing better medical implants
A team of MIT researchers found that the geometry of implantable devices has a significant impact on how well the body will tolerate them.
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust Foundation, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Tayebati Family Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-May-2015
International Journal of Cancer
Men with asthma less likely to develop lethal prostate cancer
In what they are calling a surprising finding in a large study of men who completed questionnaires and allowed scientists to review their medical records, Johns Hopkins researchers report that men with a history of asthma were less likely than those without it to develop lethal prostate cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Vanessa Wasta
wasta@jhmi.edu
410-614-2916
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 18-May-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Cooling children after cardiac arrest provides no significant benefit
A recent clinical trial, published in the New England Journal of Medicine and co-authored by the Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Medical Center (DMC) Chief of Critical Care and Wayne State University School of Medicine Professor of Pediatrics Kathleen L. Meert, M.D., shows that 'therapeutic hypothermia' is no more effective than maintaining normal body temperature in children who've suffered cardiac arrest before being hospitalized.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Psychological Science
Imagination beats practice in boosting visual search performance
Practice may not make perfect, but visualization might. New research shows that people who imagined a visual target before having to pick it out of a group of distracting items were faster at finding the target than those who did an actual practice run beforehand. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 18-May-2015
European Urology
Urine-based test improves on PSA for detecting prostate cancer
A new urine-based test improved prostate cancer detection -- including detecting more aggressive forms of prostate cancer -- compared to traditional models based on prostate serum antigen, or PSA, levels, a new study finds.
Hologic/Gen-Probe Inc., Early Detection Research Network, National Institutes of Health, Prostate Cancer Foundation, A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute, Doris Duke Foundation, American Cancer Society

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Digestive Disease Week
Study finds non-invasive colon cancer screening may be promising for African-Americans
In a first-of-its-kind clinical trial, physician-scientists at University Hospitals Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine found that a new non-invasive technology for colon cancer screening is a promising alternative to colonoscopy for African-Americans. The study recruited patients to compare the effectiveness of stool DNA testing with colonoscopy for detecting large colon polyps.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Alicia Reale
alicia.reale@uhhospitals.org
University Hospitals Case Medical Center

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Microclinics help keep Kenyan HIV patients in care
The results showed that microclinics cut in half the normal rate of disengagement from care, which was defined as missing a clinic appointment by 90 days or more, when compared to the control group, and reduced the perceived stigma of HIV by 25 percent within the larger community.
Tides Foundation, Craigslist Foundation, Mulago Foundation, Rise Up Foundation, Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, Segal Family Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and others

Contact: Jeff Sheehy
jeff.sheehy@ucsf.edu
415-845-1132
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature Immunology
UCSF-led study explains how early childhood vaccination reduces leukemia risk
A team led by UCSF researchers has discovered how a commonly administered vaccine protects against acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common type of childhood cancer.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, William Lawrence and Blanche Hughes Foundation, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wellcome Trust, Cancer Research UK

Contact: Juliana Bunim
juliana.bunim@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature Neuroscience
NYU researchers ID part of the brain for processing speech
A team of NYU neuroscientists has identified a part of the brain exclusively devoted to processing speech, helping settle a long-standing debate about role-specific neurological functions.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Diabetes Care
Early detection and treatment of type 2 diabetes may reduce heart disease and mortality
Screening to identify type 2 diabetes followed by early treatment could result in substantial health benefits, according to new research that combined large scale clinical observations and innovative computer modeling.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Computational design improves potency of a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody
A new study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation reveals that increasing the stability of an HIV-1-targeting broadly neutralizing antibody improves efficacy.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature Methods
New device successfully captures metastasis-associated circulating tumor cell clusters
The latest version of a microfluidic device for capturing rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is the first designed specifically to capture clusters of two or more cells, rather than single cells. These CTC clusters appear gnificantly more likely to cause metastases than single circulating tumor cells.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Stand Up to Cancer, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Prostate Cancer Foundation, Charles Evans Foundation, Johnson and Johnson

Contact: Katie Marquedant
kmarquedant@partners.org
617-726-0337
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Advanced Materials
Gel filled with nanosponges cleans up MRSA infections
Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego developed a gel filled with toxin-absorbing nanosponges that could lead to an effective treatment for skin and wound infections caused by MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), an antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This 'nanosponge-hydrogel' minimized the growth of skin lesions on mice infected with MRSA -- without the use of antibiotics. The researchers recently published their findings online in dvanced Materials.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How the immune system controls the human biological clock in times of infection
An important link between the human body clock and the immune system has relevance for better understanding inflammatory and infectious diseases. Researchers report how a critical white blood cell called the macrophage, when exposed to bacteria, makes the biological clock inside the macrophage stop, allowing it to become inflamed.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, European Research Council, Science Foundation Ireland

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3716.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

     
   

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