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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3499.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Evolution and Human Behavior
'Red effect' sparks interest in female monkeys
Recent studies showed that the color red tends increase our attraction toward others, feelings of jealousy, and even reaction times. Now, new research shows that female monkeys also respond to the color red, suggesting that biology, rather than our culture, may play the fundamental role in our 'red' reactions.
The Sloan Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, University of Rochester

Contact: Monique Patenaude
monique.patenaude@rochester.edu
585-276-3693
University of Rochester

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
High-fat meals could be more harmful to males than females, according to new obesity research
Male and female brains are not equal when it comes to the biological response to a high-fat diet. Cedars-Sinai Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute scientist Deborah Clegg, Ph.D., and a team of international investigators found that the brains of male laboratory mice exposed to the same high-fat diet as their female counterparts developed brain inflammation and heart disease that were not seen in the females.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Laura Coverson
laura.coverson@cshs.org
310-423-5215
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
UH Cancer Center receives $3.5 million NCORP grant for cancer care, research in Hawaii
The National Cancer Institute awarded the University of Hawai`i Cancer Center and The Queen's Medical Center a grant of more than $3.8 million over five years to conduct cancer clinical trials in the state for minority and underserved populations. Queen's was chosen to lead and perform the cancer care delivery research component of the grant.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Stacy Wong
swong@cc.hawaii.edu
808-356-5753
University of Hawaii Cancer Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Cell
How a molecular Superman protects the genome from damage
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists have found a new role for the RNAi protein Dicer in preserving genomic stability. They discovered that Dicer helps prevent collisions during DNA replication by freeing transcription machinery from active genes. Without Dicer function, transcription and replication machinery collide, leading to DNA damage and massive changes across the genome – changes that are associated with aging and cancer.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Spanish Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute-Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Jaclyn Jansen
jjansen@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
Staph 'gangs' share nutrients during infection: Vanderbilt study
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can share resources to cause chronic infections, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. Like the individual members of a gang who might be relatively harmless alone, they turn deadly when they get together with their 'friends.' The findings, reported Oct. 8 in Cell Host & Microbe, shed light on a long-standing question in infectious diseases and may inform new treatment strategies.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Leigh MacMillan
leigh.macmillan@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Researchers develop personalized ovarian cancer vaccines
Researchers used new genomic analysis techniques to identify specific protein sequences, called epitopes, that the immune system can use to identify cancer cells. Their key insight was that the most effective epitopes to include in a personalized vaccine are not those that react most strongly with the immune system, but rather the epitopes that differ most from the host's normal tissue.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Krieger
kim.krieger@uconn.edu
860-486-0361
University of Connecticut

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Modeling tumor dormancy
A new computational model developed in the laboratory of Salvatore Torquato, a Professor of Chemistry at Princeton University, may help illuminate the conditions surrounding tumor dormancy and the switch to a malignant state. Published today in PLOS ONE, the so-called cellular automaton model simulated various scenarios of tumor growth leading to tumor suppression, dormancy or proliferation.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Tien Nguyen
tienn@princeton.edu
Princeton University

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Why are some people with autism hypersensitive to sound?
The University of California, Riverside has received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the mechanisms of auditory hypersensitivity -- an increased sensitivity to sound through a negative emotional response -- in Fragile X syndrome (FXS). The five-year $8.7 million grant is awarded to UC Riverside and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. FXS is the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and the most common cause of autism.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Brain's compass relies on geometric relationships, say Penn Researchers
The brain has a complex system for keeping track of which direction you are facing as you move about; remembering how to get from one place to another would otherwise be impossible. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown how the brain anchors this mental compass. Their findings provide a neurological basis for something that psychologists have long observed about navigational behavior: people use geometrical relationships to orient themselves.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Sugared soda consumption, cell aging associated in new study
Sugar-sweetened soda consumption might promote disease independently from its role in obesity, according to UC San Francisco researchers who found in a new study that drinking sugary drinks was associated with cell aging.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeffrey.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
Pitt/McGowan Institute team discovers stem cells in the esophagus
Despite previous indications to the contrary, the esophagus does have its own pool of stem cells, said researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in an animal study published online today in Cell Reports. The findings could lead to new insights into the development and treatment of esophageal cancer and the precancerous condition known as Barrett's esophagus.
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, National Institutes of Health, McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Immunity
Scripps Research Institute scientists identify trigger for crucial immune system cell
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified the long-sought activating molecules for a rare but crucial subset of immune system cells that help rally other white blood cells to fight infection. In the process, the team also uncovered a previously unsuspected link between the mammalian immune system and the communication systems of simpler organisms such as bacteria.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
That pregnant feeling makes a fly start nesting
Across the animal kingdom, it's not uncommon for pregnancy to change an expectant mom's behavior. Even female flies have their own rudimentary way of 'nesting,' which appears to be brought on by the stretch of their egg-filled abdomens rather than the act of mating, according to a Duke study.
Esther A. and Joseph Klingenstein Fund, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Cell
Misfolded proteins clump together in a surprising place
Scientists at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have made a surprising finding about the aggregates of misfolded cellular proteins that have been linked to aging-related disorders such as Parkinson's disease. The researchers report their results in the Oct. 16, 2014 online issue of the journal Cell.
Stowers Institute for Medical Research, American Heart Association, NIH/National Institute of General Medicine Sciences

Contact: Kim Bland
ksb@stowers.org
816-926-4015
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Current Biology
Are male brains wired to ignore food for sex?
Choosing between two good things can be tough. When animals must decide between feeding and mating, it can get even trickier. In a discovery that might ring true even for some humans, researchers have shown that male brains -- at least in nematodes -- will suppress the ability to locate food in order to instead focus on finding a mate.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation, Human Frontiers Science Program, Autism Speaks

Contact: Mark Michaud
mark_michaud@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-4790
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Science
New front in war on Alzheimer's and other protein-linked brain diseases
Proteins must fold into the right 3-D structure to work, and the body produces many chaperone molecules to refold misfolded proteins. Heat shock boosts the number of these chaperones. Andrew Dillin of UC Berkeley now shows that, equally important, heat shock also boosts a protein that stabilizes actin, the building block of the cytoskeleton. This opens new avenues for therapies to prevent protein misfolding and its associated diseases -- Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Cancer Cell
Human cancer prognosis is related to newly identified immune cell
A newly discovered population of immune cells in tumors is associated with less severe cancer outcomes in humans, and may have therapeutic potential, according to a new UC San Francisco study of 3,600 human tumors of 12 types, as well as mouse experiments.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeffrey.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
New research center to focus on family caregivers of elderly, disabled
The University of Illinois at Chicago has received a five-year, $4.3 million grant from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research and the Administration for Community Living to establish a new, multi-institutional center to study the needs of families caring for people with disabilities.
NIH/National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Administration for Community Living

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
NYU Langone Medical Center to lead multi-institutional MRSA research funded by the NIH
NYU Langone Medical Center will lead National Institutes of Health funded research to discover the functional immunology and microbial genetics of staphylococcus aureus, one of the most common pathogens leading to life-threatening blood-borne infections.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jim Mandler
jim.mandler@nyumc.org
212-404-3525
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
AIDS and Behavior
Study models ways to cut Mexico's HIV rates
A new study projects that increasing condom use or antiretroviral therapy among Mexico City's male sex workers would produce a significant advance against the nation's HIV epidemic by reducing the rate of infections among the sex workers' partners.
National Institutes of Health, The Mexican National Center for HIV/AIDS Control and Prevention, Brown University

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Genes and Development
Key moment mapped in assembly of DNA-splitting molecular machine
Scientists reveal crucial steps and surprising structures in the genesis of the enzyme that divides the DNA double helix during cell replication.
National Institutes of Health, United Kingdom Medical Research Council

Contact: Justin Eure
jeure@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
American Society of Clinical Oncology
Subsidies help breast cancer patients adhere to hormone therapy
A federal prescription-subsidy program for low-income women on Medicare significantly improved their adherence to hormone therapy to prevent the recurrence of breast cancer after surgery.
American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sharon Parmet
sparmet@uic.edu
312-413-2695
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Analytical Chemistry
Dolphin 'breathalyzer' could help diagnose animal and ocean health
Alcohol consumption isn't the only thing a breath analysis can reveal. Scientists have been studying its possible use for diagnosing a wide range of conditions in humans -- and now in the beloved bottlenose dolphin. In a report in the American Chemical Society journal Analytical Chemistry, one team describes a new instrument that can analyze the metabolites in breath from dolphins, which have been dying in alarming numbers along the Atlantic coast this year.
Office of Naval Research, Hartwell Foundation, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
eLife
Researchers look to exploit females' natural resistance to infection
Researchers have linked increased resistance to bacterial pneumonia in female mice to an enzyme activated by the female sex hormone estrogen.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Jennifer Mitchell
j.mitchell@elifesciences.org
44-012-238-55373
eLife

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
eLife
Scientists 'must not become complacent' when assessing pandemic threat from flu viruses
As our ability to assess the pandemic risk from strains of influenza virus increases with the latest scientific developments, we must not allow ourselves to become complacent that the most substantial threats have been identified, argue an international consortium of scientists.
DHS/Research and Policy for Infectious Disease Dynamics, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Craig Brierley
craig.brierley@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-66205
University of Cambridge

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3499.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

     
   

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