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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3446.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
Atomic structure of key muscle component revealed in Penn study
Adding to the growing fundamental understanding of the machinery of muscle cells, a group of biophysicists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania describe in the journal Science this week -- in minute detail -- how actin filaments are stabilized at one of their ends to form a basic muscle structure called the sarcomere.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Neuron
UCSF researchers uncover an unexpected role for endostatin in the nervous system
Researchers at UC San Francisco have discovered that endostatin, a protein that once aroused intense interest as a possible cancer treatment, plays a key role in the stable functioning of the nervous system.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeffrey.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Pesticide linked to 3 generations of disease
Washington State University researchers say ancestral exposures to the pesticide methoxychlor may lead to adult onset kidney disease, ovarian disease and obesity in future generations.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Skinner
skinner@wsu.edu
509-335-1524
Washington State University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Cell
Mechanism found for development of protective HIV antibodies
Scientists at Duke Medicine have found an immunologic mechanism that makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people who are HIV-1 infected.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Science
Jackson Laboratory researchers find new mechanism for neurodegeneration
A research team led by Jackson Laboratory professor and Howard Hughes investigator Susan Ackerman, Ph.D., have pinpointed a surprising mechanism behind neurodegeneration in mice, one that involves a defect in a key component of the cellular machinery that makes proteins, known as transfer RNA or tRNA.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Science Foundation

Contact: Joyce Peterson
joyce.peterson@jax.org
207-288-6058
Jackson Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Child Development
Stronger early reading skills predict higher intelligence later
A study of 1,890 identical twins has found that strong early reading skill might positively affect later intelligence. The twins, who are part of an ongoing longitudinal study in the United Kingdom, share all their genes as well as a home environment. Differences shown in intellectual ability came from experiences they didn't share. The twin with stronger early reading skills was found to have higher overall intellectual ability by age 7.
UK Medical Research Council, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, European Research Council

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Child Development
Stress tied to change in children's gene expression related to emotion regulation, physical health
In a new study, researchers found that maltreatment affects the way children's genes are activated, which has implications for their long-term development and health. The researchers examined DNA methylation, a biomechanical mechanism that helps cells control which genes are turned on or off, in the blood of 56 children ages 11 to 14. Disruptions in this system affect emotional behavior, stress levels, and the immune system. These findings echo those of earlier studies of rodents.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Neuron
Choice bias: A quirky byproduct of learning from reward
Many people value rewards they choose themselves more than rewards they merely receive, even when the rewards are actually equivalent. A new study in Neuron provides evidence that this long-observed quirk of behavior is a byproduct of how the brain reinforces learning from reward.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
PLOS Computational Biology
Gene changes in breast cancer cells pinpointed with new computational method
Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University, working with high-throughput data generated by breast cancer biologists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have devised a computational method to determine how gene networks are rewired as normal breast cells turn malignant and as they respond to potential cancer therapy agents.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute, DOE/Breast Cancer Research Program

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Researchers find mechanism that clears excess of protein linked with Type 2 diabetes
Researchers suggest that, in people who do not have Type 2 diabetes, autophagy prevents the accumulation of toxic forms of IAPP. In people with Type 2 diabetes, the process appears to not work properly, contributing to the destruction of beta cells. As the body's insulin producers, beta cells play a key role in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases,Larry L. Hillblom Foundation, Esther B. O'Keeffe Foundation

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Study links autistic behaviors to enzyme
Biomedical scientists at the University of California, Riverside have published a study today that sheds light on the cause of autistic behaviors in Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common cause of autism. They found that an enzyme, MMP-9, plays a critical role. Working on mice, the researchers targeted MMP-9 as a potential therapeutic target in FXS and showed that genetic deletion of MMP-9 favorably impacts key aspects of FXS-associated anatomical and behaviors.
FRAXA Research Foundation, National Institutes of Health, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
The Journal of Neuroscience
Gene inhibitor, salmon fibrin restore function lost in spinal cord injury
A therapy combining salmon fibrin injections into the spinal cord and injections of a gene inhibitor into the brain restored voluntary motor function impaired by spinal cord injury, scientists at UC Irvine's Reeve-Irvine Research Center have found.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Researchers unlock the protein puzzle
By using brightly hued dyes, George Mason University researchers discovered an innovative way to reveal where proteins touch each other, possibly leading to new treatments for cancer, arthritis, heart disease and even lung disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michele McDonald
mmcdon15@gmu.edu
703-993-8781
George Mason University

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Toward an oral therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease: Using a cancer drug
Currently, no cure exists for Alzheimer's disease, the devastating neurological disease affecting more than 5 million Americans. However, scientists are now reporting new progress on a set of compounds, initially developed for cancer treatment, that shows promise as a potential oral therapy for Alzheimer's. Their study appears in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.
National Institutes of Health, Marian S. Ware Alzheimer's program, Penn Medicine Neuroscience Center

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Vanderbilt-led study identifies genes linked to breast cancer in East Asian women
A new study in East Asian women has identified three genetic changes linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. The research, led by Vanderbilt University investigators, was published in Nature Genetics.
National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Contact: Dagny Stuart
dagny.stuart@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
Age of puberty in girls influenced by which parent their genes are inherited from
The age at which girls reach sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes, a small sub-set of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent passes on that gene, according to new research published today in the journal Nature.
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Diabetes
UTMB researchers discover that brown fat protects against diabetes and obesity in humans
Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have shown for the first time that people with higher levels of brown fat, or brown adipose tissue, in their bodies have better blood sugar control, higher insulin sensitivity and a better metabolism for burning fat stores.
National Institutes of Health, American Diabetes Association, UTMB/Institute for Translational Sciences, Shriners Hospitals for Children, UTMB/Claude Pepper Older Americans Independence Center, UTMB/Sealy Center on Aging

Contact: Donna Ramirez
donna.ramirez@utmb.edu
409-772-8791
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
Age of puberty in girls influenced by which parent their genes are inherited from
The age at which girls reach sexual maturity is influenced by 'imprinted' genes, a small sub-set of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent passes on that gene, according to new research published in the journal Nature.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Coriell Institute for Medical Research, National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia, New South Wales Cancer Council, Victorian Health Promotion Foundation, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Craig Brierley
craig.brierley@admin.cam.ac.uk
44-012-237-66205
University of Cambridge

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Nature
New view of stomach cancer could hasten better therapies
In a massive effort to catalog the molecular causes of stomach cancer, scientists, including researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, have identified four subtypes of tumors based on shared mutations and other molecular abnormalities. They say the new classification promises to advance clinical research to develop improved therapies for the third-leading cancer killer worldwide.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anne Doerr
anne_doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Science Translational Medicine
UNC researchers find unsuspected characteristics of new CF drugs, offering potential paths to more effective therapies
Last month, the pharmaceutical company Vertex released results from a large phase 3 clinical trial for cystic fibrosis patients, showing that a combination of two new cystic fibrosis drugs modestly improved lung function and offered better health outcomes for some patients. Now, scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and the University of North Carolina Marsico Lung Institute have shown that one of these drugs counteracts the intended beneficial molecular effect of the other.
National Institutes of Health, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Else Kröner-Fresenius Foundation

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unchealth.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Combination antiretroviral therapy helps treat HCV in patients co-infected with HIV
Treatment of HIV patients co-infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) with an anti-retroviral drug therapy not only tackles HIV, but also reduces HCV replication, according to a new study lead by a University of Cincinnati researcher.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NHI/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, Department of Energy

Contact: Cedric Ricks
cedric.ricks@uc.edu
513-558-4657
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Oral Oncology
Anti-pain agent shrinks oral cancers, leaves healthy tissues alone
Oral cancers strike thousands of Americans annually, inflicting pain and shortening their lives. New research out of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio showed that an agent called capsazepine reduced the oral tumors in mice without damaging surrounding tissues. It's a hopeful start with more work to go.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Psychosomatic Research
In asthma, it's not just what you smell, but what you think you smell
New research from the Monell Center reveals that simply believing that an odor is potentially harmful can increase airway inflammation in asthmatics for at least 24 hours following exposure. The findings highlight the role that expectations can play in health-related outcomes.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Leslie Stein
stein@monell.org
267-519-4707
Monell Chemical Senses Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
UI study finds potential genetic link between epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders
A new University of Iowa study, published online July 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveals a potential link between epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
The AAPS Journal
Researchers create vaccine for dust-mite allergies
University of Iowa researchers have created a vaccine for dust-mite allergies. In lab tests and animal trials, the nano-sized vaccine package was readily absorbed by immune cells and dramatically lowered allergic responses. Results appear in the The AAPS Journal.
National Institutes of Health, American Cancer Society

Contact: Richard Lewis
richard-c-lewis@uiowa.edu
319-384-0012
University of Iowa

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3446.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

     
   

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