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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3469.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Texas Biomed gains $2.7 million NIH grant to research genetic basis of diseases
The Texas Biomedical Research Institute has been awarded a $2.7 million grant from the US National Institutes of Health to fund innovative approaches to genetics research aimed at developing new therapies for heart disease and other conditions with genetic components.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute for General Medical Sciences

Contact: Mary Uhlig
muhlig@dublinandassociates.com
210-227-0221
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Journal of Pediatrics
Human milk fat improves growth in premature infants
For premature infants, adequate growth while in the neonatal intensive care unit is an indicator of better long-term health and developmental outcomes. Researchers at the USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital have now successfully incorporated a cream supplement into premature infants' diets that improved their growth outcomes in the NICU. The report appears today in the Journal of Pediatrics.
US Department of Agriculture, NIH/National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Dipali Pathak
pathak@bcm.edu
713-798-4710
Baylor College of Medicine

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Food allergies more widespread among inner-city children
Already known for their higher-than-usual risk of asthma and environmental allergies, young inner-city children appear to suffer disproportionately from food allergies as well, according to results of a study led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Food allergies more widespread among inner-city children
Already known for their higher-than-usual risk of asthma and environmental allergies, young inner-city children appear to suffer disproportionately from food allergies as well, according to results of a study led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Potential drug therapy for kidney stones identified in mouse study
New research in mice suggests that a class of drugs approved to treat leukemia and epilepsy also may be effective against kidney stones.
National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association

Contact: Diane Duke Williams
williamsdia@wustl.edu
314-286-0111
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Scripps Research Institute chemists uncover powerful new click chemistry reactivity
Chemists led by Nobel laureate K. Barry Sharpless at The Scripps Research Institute have used his click chemistry to uncover unprecedented, powerful reactivity for making new drugs, diagnostics, plastics, smart materials and many other products.
Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, W.M. Keck Foundation, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Science
CF mucus defect present at birth
New research by University of Iowa scientists shows that cystic fibrosis (CF), a life-shortening, inherited condition that affects about 30,000 Americans, causes abnormalities in airway mucus that impairs the ability to clear particles and germs out of the airway.
National Institutes of Health, Carver Foundation, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

Contact: Jennifer Brown
jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu
319-356-7124
University of Iowa Health Care

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Severity of sleep apnea impacts risk of resistant high blood pressure
A new study shows a strong association between severe, untreated obstructive sleep apnea and the risk of elevated blood pressure despite the use of high blood pressure medications.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Lynn Celmer
lcelmer@aasmnet.org
630-737-9700
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Nature Medicine
Novel treatment strengthens bones in genetic disease neurofibromatosis type-1
An enzyme therapy may prevent skeletal abnormalities associated with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type-1, Vanderbilt investigators have discovered. The researchers demonstrated in a mouse model of the disorder that the enzyme asfotase-alpha improves bone growth, mineralization and strength. Their findings are published in the August issue of Nature Medicine.
Children's Tumor Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Leigh MacMillan
leigh.macmillan@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Journal of Aging and Health, European Journal of Aging
A husband's declining health could put Taiwanese women at risk for health issues
Taiwanese wives with ailing husbands see increases in blood glucose levels, says a new report published by Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Such changes are less likely for men, however, the researchers report. Overall, both men and women experience increased glucose levels if they are widowed.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Taiwan Department of Health, Taiwan National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan Provincial Government

Contact: B. Rose Huber
brhuber@princeton.edu
609-258-0157
Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
New non-invasive technique controls size of molecules penetrating the blood-brain barrier
A new technique developed by Elisa Konofagou, associate professor of biomedical engineering and radiology at Columbia Engineering, has demonstrated for the first time that the size of molecules penetrating the blood-brain barrier can be controlled using acoustic pressure -- the pressure of an ultrasound beam -- to let specific molecules through. This innovative method, published in the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism, may help improve drug delivery to the brain.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly.evarts@columbia.edu
347-453-7408
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Inside the cell, an ocean of buffeting waves
Harvard-led researchers put forth a new model of the cytoplasm as a gel, not a liquid, and demonstrate that ATP-driven processes are indirectly responsible for transport within the cell. A measurement of the spectrum of forces exerted on the cytoplasm at any given time can provide a snapshot of the metabolic state of the cell.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, Hannah's Hope Fund

Contact: Caroline Perry
cperry@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Neuron
Researchers develop strategy to combat genetic ALS, FTD
A team of researchers at Mayo Clinic and The Scripps Research Institute in Florida have developed a new therapeutic strategy to combat the most common genetic risk factor for the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) and frontotemporal dementia.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Services, IS Department of Defense

Contact: Kevin Punsky
punsky.kevin@mayo.edu
904-953-0746
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Strong state alcohol policies reduce likelihood of binge drinking
People living in states with stronger alcohol policy environments have a substantially lower likelihood of any binge drinking, frequent binge drinking, and high-intensity binge drinking, according to a new study by researchers at the Boston University School of Public Health and Boston Medical Center, published in the current issue of the American Journal of Public Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lisa Chedekel
Chedekel@bu.edu
617-571-6370
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cancer Research
Protein found to block benefits of vitamin A cancer therapy
Retinoic acid is a form of vitamin A that is used to treat and help prevent the recurrence of a variety of cancers, but for some patients the drug is not effective. The reason for this resistance was unclear until this week when researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center demonstrated that a protein known as AEG-1 blocks the effects of retinoic acid in leukemia and liver cancer.
National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnel Foundation

Contact: Alaina Schneider
afschneider@vcu.edu
804-628-4578
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Antibodies, together with viral 'inducers,' found to control HIV in mice
A new strategy devised by researchers at Rockefeller University harnesses the power of broadly neutralizing antibodies, along with a combination of compounds that induce viral transcription, in order to attack latent reservoirs of HIV-infected cells in an approach termed 'shock and kill.'
National Institutes of Health, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Zach Veilleux
zveilleux@rockefeller.edu
212-327-8982
Rockefeller University

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Science
Harnessing the power of bacteria's sophisticated immune system
Bacteria's ability to destroy viruses has long puzzled scientists, but researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they now have a clear picture of the bacterial immune system and say its unique shape is likely why bacteria can so quickly recognize and destroy their assailants.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Researchers identify a mechanism that stops progression of abnormal cells into cancer
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine report that a tumor suppressor pathway, called the Hippo pathway, is responsible for sensing abnormal chromosome numbers in cells and triggering cell cycle arrest, thus preventing progression into cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Gina DiGravio
gina.digravio@bmc.org
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Science
Memories of errors foster faster learning
Using a deceptively simple set of experiments, researchers at Johns Hopkins have learned why people learn an identical or similar task faster the second, third and subsequent time around. The reason: they are aided not only by memories of how to perform the task, but also by memories of the errors made the first time.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Tissue development 'roadmap' created to guide stem cell medicine
In a boon to stem cell research and regenerative medicine, scientists at Boston Children's Hospital, the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and Boston University have created a computer algorithm called CellNet as a 'roadmap' for cell and tissue engineering, to ensure that cells engineered in the lab have the same favorable properties as cells in our own bodies.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Children's Hospital Stem Cell Program, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation

Contact: Kristen Dattoli
kristen.dattoli@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Boston Children's Hospital

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cancer Research
NSAIDs benefit overweight breast cancer patients, study finds
Researchers have determined that postmenopausal overweight or obese breast cancer patients receiving hormone therapy as part of their treatment and who use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin or ibuprofen have significantly lower breast cancer recurrence rates and a sizable delay in time to cancer recurrence.
United States Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Kimberly Atkins
kimberly.atkins@austin.utexas.edu
512-471-3151
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Neuron
Common mutation successfully targeted in Lou Gehrig's disease and frontotemporal dementia
An international team led by scientists from the Florida campuses of the Scripps Research Institute and the Mayo Clinic have for the first time successfully designed a therapeutic strategy targeting a specific genetic mutation that causes a common form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig's disease, as well a type of frontotemporal dementia.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Services, Department of Defense, Italian Ministry of Health, Mayo

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cancer Research
NSAIDs may lower breast cancer recurrence rate in overweight and obese women
Recurrence of hormone-related breast cancer was cut by half in overweight and obese women who regularly used aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, according to data published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Department of Defense, Breast Cancer Research Program

Contact: Jeremy Moore
jeremy.moore@aacr.org
215-446-7109
American Association for Cancer Research

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cancer Research
Aspirin may slow recurrence in breast cancer patients
New findings published in the journal Cancer Research reveal some postmenopausal overweight breast cancer patients who use anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin or ibuprofen have significantly lower breast cancer recurrence rates. Anti-inflammatory use reduced the recurrence of ERα positive breast cancer by 50 percent and extended patients' disease-free period by more than two years. Research was performed at the Cancer Therapy & Research Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio and University of Texas Austin.
US Department of Defense, Breast Cancer Research Program, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Catherine Duncan
duncancl@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2570
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
Cell
Researchers identify a brain 'switchboard' important in attention and sleep
Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere, using a mouse model, have recorded the activity of individual nerve cells in a small part of the brain that works as a 'switchboard,' directing signals coming from the outside world or internal memories. Because human brain disorders such as schizophrenia, autism, and post-traumatic stress disorder typically show disturbances in that switchboard, the investigators say the work suggests new strategies in understanding and treating them.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, Mathematical Biosciences Institute, NARSAD Young Investigators Grant

Contact: Lorinda Klein
lorindaann.klein@nyumc.org
212-404-3533
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3469.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

     
   

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