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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3681.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2015
Maternal stress increases development of fetal neuroblastoma in animal model
While genetics play a substantial role in development of neuroblastoma, scientists say that something else is in play that elevates the risk: stress. Researchers have shown in mice genetically predisposed to develop neuroblastoma that maternal stress can push onset of the cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, St. Baldrick's, and others

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2015
Finding liver cancer early and reversing its course
Liver cancer is often lethal in humans because it is diagnosed in late stages, but new work in animal models has identified a potential diagnostic biomarker of the disease and a potential way to reverse the damage done.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, ONYX Pharmaceuticals

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study shows new technology may improve management of leading causes of blindness
Research published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences demonstrates that technology invented by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University's Casey Eye Institute can improve the clinical management of the leading causes of blindness. Optical coherence tomography angiography could largely replace current dye-based angiography in the management of these diseases.
National Institutes of Health, Clinical and Translational Science Award, Research to Prevent Blindness, Foundation Fighting Blindness, German Research Foundation

Contact: Ariane Le Chevallier
holma@ohsu.edu
503-494-8231
Oregon Health & Science University

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
AIDS and Behavior
A bad buzz: Men with HIV need fewer drinks to feel effects
Researchers at Yale and the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System compared the number of drinks that men with HIV infection, versus those without it, needed to get a buzz. They found that HIV-infected men were more sensitive to the effects of alcohol than uninfected men.
NIH/National Institutes on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, US Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Ziba Kashef
ziba.kashef@yale.edu
203-436-9317
Yale University

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Neuropsychologia
Living life in the third person
Imagine living a healthy, normal life without the ability to re-experience in your mind personal events from your past. You have learned details about past episodes from your life and can recite these to family and friends, but you can't mentally travel back in time to imagine yourself in any of them. Cognitive scientists had a rare opportunity to examine three middle-aged adults who essentially live their lives in the 'third person.'
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Kelly Connelly
kconnelly@baycrest.org
416-785-2432
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Journal of Biological Chemistry
New signaling pathway discovered in HER2-positive breast cancer, and 2 powerful drug targets
A team at CSHL has published results of experiments that lay bare a previously unknown pathway activated in a highly lethal form of breast cancer. The pathway, they discovered, contains at least two potentially powerful drug targets, according to the team leader. The breast cancer type is called HER2-positive, and affects about one cancer patient in four.
National Institutes of Health, The Gladowksy Breast Cancer Foundation, The Don Monti Memorial Research Foundation, Hansen Memorial Foundation, West Islip Breast Cancer Coalition for Long Island, Glen Cove CARES, Find a Cure today (FACT), and others

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
New study unravels why common blood pressure medicine can fail
Every year, more than 120 million prescriptions are written worldwide for thiazide drugs, a group of salt-lowering medicines used to treat high blood pressure. These drugs often work very well. But in some patients, thiazides are not effective. The reasons for this have remained a mystery. Now, a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has revealed a key mechanism for this failure.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: David Kohn
dkohn@som.umaryland.edu
410-706-7590
University of Maryland School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Critical Care Medicine
PTSD common in ICU survivors
In a recent Johns Hopkins study, researchers found that nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors suffer from PTSD. They also identified possible triggers for PTSD and indicated a potential preventive strategy: having patients keep ICU diaries. The findings will be published in the May issue of Critical Care Medicine.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marin Hedin
mhedin2@jhmi.edu
410-502-9429
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Nature Cell Biology
Breast tumor stiffness and metastasis risk linked by molecule's movement
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have discovered a molecular mechanism that connects breast tissue stiffness to tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. The study may inspire new approaches to predicting patient outcomes and halting tumor metastasis.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense Breast Cancer Program, American Cancer Society, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, ARCS Foundation, Fondation pour la Recherche Médicale

Contact: Heather Buschman
hbuschman@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study shows early environment has a lasting impact on stress response systems
The study finds that children raised in Romanian orphanages had blunted stress response systems, while children placed with foster parents before the age of 2 showed stress responses similar to those of children raised in typical families.
John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Binder Family Foundation, Help the Children of Romania Inc. Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Deborah Bach
bach2@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
American Journal of Hematology
Decreased red blood cell clearance predicts development and worsening of serious diseases
Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have found the probable mechanism underlying a previously described biomarker associated with the risk of developing serious diseases ranging from cancer to cardiovascular disease and the risk of serious complications.
NIH/National Institute for Diabetes and Kidney Disease, National Institutes of Health, Abbott Hematology

Contact: McKenzie Ridings
mridings@partners.org
617-726-0274
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Iowa State, Ames Lab scientists describe protein pumps that allow bacteria to resist drugs
Research teams led by Edward Yu of Iowa State University and the Ames Laboratory have described the structure of two closely related protein pumps that allow bacteria to resist certain medications. The findings have just been published by Nature Communications and as the April 7 cover paper in Cell Reports.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy/Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Iowa State University

Contact: Edward Yu
ewyu@iastate.edu
515-294-4955
Iowa State University

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Nature Chemistry
Happily ever after: Scientists arrange protein-nanoparticle marriage
University at Buffalo researchers have discovered a way to easily and effectively fasten proteins to nanoparticles -- essentially an arranged marriage -- by simply mixing them together. The biotechnology, described April 20 online in the journal Nature Chemistry, is in its infancy. But it already has shown promise for developing an HIV vaccine and as a way to target cancer cells.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Belly fat chatter may be what's raising your blood pressure
Michigan State University researchers, who were the first to suggest that high blood pressure could be caused by belly fat hormones 'talking' with blood vessels in the abdomen, have received a nearly $7 million National Institutes of Health grant to further their work.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sarina Gleason
sarina.gleason@cabs.msu.edu
517-355-9742
Michigan State University

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Animal Behaviour
Big butts aren't everything to male baboons
While the female baboon's big red bottom may be an eyesore to some, it has an aphrodisiac effect on her mates. Biologists have long thought that baboon males prefer females with bigger backsides as the mark of a good mother, but a Duke study reveals that the size of a female's swollen rump doesn't matter as much as previously thought.
Duke University Center for International Studies, Duke Biology, Princeton Center for the Demography of Aging, L.S.B. Leakey Foundation, Fulbright Program, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
New breast cancer screening analysis confirms biennial interval optimal for average risk women
Results from a second comprehensive analysis of mammography screening, this time using data from digital mammography, confirms findings from a 2009 analysis of film mammography: biennial (every two years) screening offers a favorable balance of benefits to harm for women ages 50 to 74 who have an average risk of developing breast cancer.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Nature Genetics
Childhood syndrome combining lung disease, arthritis is identified
Using the latest genome sequencing techniques, a research team led by scientists from UC San Francisco, Baylor College of Medicine, and Texas Children's Hospital has identified a new autoimmune syndrome characterized by a combination of severe lung disease and arthritis that currently has no therapy.
National Institutes of Health, Jeffrey Modell Foundation, Foundation of the American Thoracic Society, Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, Nina Ireland Program for Lung Health at UCSF

Contact: Pete Farley
peter.farley@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Annals of Internal Medicine
Statin use in elderly would prevent disease but could carry considerable side effects
A new study by UC San Francisco has found that statins can help prevent disease in older adults but must be weighed against potentially serious side effects.
American Heart Association Western States Affiliate, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
elizabeth.fernandez@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
DNA abnormalities found in children with chronic kidney disease
A significant proportion of children with chronic kidney disease have unsuspected chromosomal imbalances, including DNA anomalies that have been linked to neurocognitive disorders, according to a new Columbia University Medical Center study.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Nature
Drugs stimulate body's own stem cells to replace brain cells lost in multiple sclerosis
Led by Case Western Reserve researchers, a multi-institutional team identified two topical drugs (miconazole and clobetasol) capable of stimulating regeneration of damaged brain cells and reversing paralysis in animal models. The results are published online Monday, April 20, in the scientific journal Nature.
National Institutes of Health, New York Stem Cell Foundation, Myelin Repair Foundation, Mt. Sinai Health Care Foundation, Goodman Trust, Cleveland Foundation, Bruce and Brenda Goodman, Lionel and Irmgard Long, Albert and Norma Geller

Contact: Jeannette Spalding
jeannette.spalding@case.edu
216-368-3004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Pancreas
Pancreatic cancer breakthrough: Scientists turn cancer cells into normal cells
Scientists find a novel avenue for therapeutic intervention of the 'silent cancer.'
Hartwell Foundation, Hirshberg Foundation, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, National Research Foundation of Korea, Yonsei University College of Medicine

Contact: Susan Gammon
sgammon@sanfordburnham.org
858-795-5012
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2015
Cancer-inflammation 'vicious cycle' detailed in new study
New findings hidden within the complex machinery behind the chronic inflammation-cancer feedback loop are presented today by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, partner with UPMC Cancer Center, at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting in Philadelphia.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Fondazione RiMED

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Imaging immunity
A novel approach that allows real-time imaging of the immune system's response to the presence of tumors -- without the need for blood draws or invasive biopsies -- offers a potential breakthrough both in diagnostics and in the ability to monitor efficacy of cancer therapies.
National Institutes of Health, Cancer Research Institute, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Champalimaud Foundation, Portuguese Science and Technology Foundation, Portuguese Ministry of Health, Lustgarten Foundation

Contact: Matt Fearer
fearer@wi.mit.edu
617-452-4630
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Annals of Internal Medicine
Statins show promise as a prevention tool for adults 75 and older, OSU study shows
Statins could be a cost-effective tool for preventing heart attacks and other cardiovascular incidents in adults over age 75, but the benefits would need to be weighed against potential side effects, a study being published this week in the Annals of Internal Medicine has found.
American Heart Association Western States Affiliate, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michelle Odden
michelle.odden@oregonstate.edu
541-737-3184
Oregon State University

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2015
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Overnight fasting may reduce breast cancer risk in women
A decrease in the amount of time spent eating and an increase in overnight fasting reduces glucose levels and may reduce the risk of breast cancer among women, report University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Carol Vassiliadis and Family

Contact: Yadira Galindo
ygalindo@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3681.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

     
   

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