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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3552.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Neuroscience
TSRI researchers discover new type of neuron that plays key role in nicotine addiction
For decades, scientists thought drug addiction was the result of two systems in the brain -- the reward system, activated when a person used a drug, and the stress system, which kicked in during withdrawal. Now scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found these two systems are actually linked. Their findings show that in the core of the brain's reward system are specific neurons that are active both with use of and withdrawal from nicotine.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism, Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive & Kidney Diseases, and others

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Major brain pathway rediscovered after century-old confusion, controversy
Researchers recently rediscovered a mysterious major brain pathway that had long been absent from anatomy textbooks. Their findings are being published Nov. 17 by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Deborah Bach
bach2@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Biotechnology
Ferret genome sequenced, holds clues to respiratory diseases
The draft sequence of the ferret genome provides genetic information important to the study of respiratory disorders. Scientists are now able to examine the network of the animal's genes activated in response to various forms of influenza. Genetic analysis also shows that cystic fibrosis lung damage begins and significantly increases during the first days of life.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael McCarthy
leilag@uw.edu
206-543-3620
University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Medicine
Potential therapy found for incurable pediatric brain tumor
scientists have discovered a new potential drug therapy for a rare, incurable pediatric brain tumor by targeting a genetic mutation found in children with the cancer. By inhibiting the tumor-forming consequences of the mutation using an experimental drug called GSKJ4, they delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice with pediatric brainstem glioma.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scripps Research Institute scientists reveal weak spots in Ebola's defenses
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified weak spots on the surface of Ebola virus that are targeted by the antibodies in ZMapp, the experimental drug cocktail administered to several patients during the recent Ebola outbreak.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation, Ray Thomas Edwards Foundation, Burroughs Welcome Fund

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
With rewards, we remember more than we should
Perhaps to prevent confusion between facts we've made a point of learning and closely related facts we haven't, the brain employs 'retrieval-induced forgetting.' In a new experiment, Brown University brain scientists show that reward during learning can undo that presumably helpful mechanism.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
New tools in fight against virus that attacks the brain
Researchers have developed new insight into a rare but deadly brain infection, called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. This disease -- which is caused by the JC virus -- is most frequently found in people with suppressed immune systems and, until now, scientists have had no effective way to study it or test new treatments.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, New York State Stem Cell Science, Biogen Idec, University of Copenhagen, Novo Nordisk Foundation

Contact: Mark Michaud
mark_michaud@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-4790
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Anti-leukemia drug may also work against ovarian cancer
An antibody therapy already in clinical trials to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia may also prove effective against ovarian cancer -- and likely other cancers as well, report researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.
National Institutes of Health, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Blood Cancer Research Fund, UCSD Foundation and Cancer Center Support Grant

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Journal of Experimental Medicine
Infection-fighting B cells go with the flow
Newly formed B cells take the easy way out when it comes to exiting the bone marrow, according to researchers at Yale University School of Medicine.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Rita Sullivan King
news@rupress.org
212-327-8603
Rockefeller University Press

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature
microRNA silencing provides a successful new model for cancer therapeutics
By exploiting a unique feature of the tumor microenvironment, scientists identify a novel delivery platform that leads to the inhibition of microRNA activity -- and the control of cancer growth.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
American Public Health Association's Annual Meeting & Exposition
Public Health Nutrition
Study suggests home cooking is a main ingredient in a healthier diet
People who frequently cook meals at home eat healthier and consume fewer calories than those who cook less, according to new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Susan Murrow
smurrow1@jhu.edu
410-955-7624
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Credit score can also describe health status
A credit score also says something about a person's health status, according to a new analysis from a long-term study of the physical and mental health of more than 1,000 New Zealanders. An international team of researchers has found a strong relationship between low credit scores and poor cardiovascular health. They conclude that personal attributes leading to poor credit scores can also contribute to poor health.
New Zealand Health Research Council, NIH/National Institute on Aging, UK Medical Research Council, Jacobs Foundation, Yad Hanadiv Rothschild Foundation

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
Rapid response for inflammation control in songbirds' brains could lead to therapies in humans
A biological process in the brains of zebra finches shows that the songbirds respond quickly to trauma and are capable of controlling the natural inflammation that occurs to protect the brain from injury.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Rebecca Basu
basu@american.edu
202-885-5978
American University

Public Release: 16-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
JAMA
High mortality associated with STEMI heart attacks that occur in hospitalized patients
A new study by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers confirms their surprising earlier finding: Patients who suffer a STEMI heart attack while while in the hospital for something else are more likely to die than patients who have the same type of heart attack outside the hospital.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Tom Hughes
Tom.Hughes@unchealth.unc.edu
984-974-1151
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 16-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
What brain studies reveal about the risk of adolescent alcohol use and abuse
What are the brain factors and behaviors that put teens at risk of alcohol use and abuse before they start drinking? Researchers explore this question in 4 abstracts from the Adolescent Development Study. One provides new evidence that adolescents at higher risk of alcoholism have reduced connections in key brain networks; another links impaired brain connections to impulsivity; and two examine impulsivity in relation to intake of sugar and DHA, an essential omega-3 fatty acid.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
215-514-9751
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
'Not just a flavoring:' Menthol and nicotine, combined, desensitize airway receptors
This study suggests menthol doesn't just act as a flavoring, but has a pharmacologic impact. The researchers say menthol acts in combination with nicotine to desensitize receptors in lungs' airways that are responsible for nicotine's irritation. Though not a focus of the work, the findings are important as FDA is considering restrictions on menthol cigarettes.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen Teber
km463@georgetown.edu
215-514-9751
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
Secondhand marijuana smoke may damage blood vessels as much as tobacco smoke
Secondhand marijuana smoke may have similar cardiovascular effects as tobacco smoke. Lab rats exposed to secondhand marijuana smoke had a 70 percent drop in blood vessel function.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Elfenworks Foundation

Contact: Darcy Spitz
darcy.spitz@heart.org
212-878-5940
American Heart Association

Public Release: 15-Nov-2014
Society for Neuro-Oncology's 19th Annual Meeting
Chemotherapy following radiation treatment slows disease progress
A chemotherapy regimen consisting of procarbazine, CCNU, and vincristine administered following radiation therapy improved progression-free survival and overall survival in adults with low-grade gliomas, a form of brain cancer, when compared to radiation therapy alone. The findings were part of the results of a Phase III clinical trial presented today at the Society for Neuro-Oncology's 19th Annual Meeting in Miami by the study's primary author Jan Buckner, M.D., deputy director, practice, at Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, Radiation Treatment Oncology Group, Alliance for Clinical Trials in Oncology, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, Southwest Oncology Group

Contact: Jan Dangor
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 15-Nov-2014
American College of Rheumatology annual meeting
Blood test could prevent medication trial and error for rheumatoid arthritis patients
A molecule in the blood shows promise as a marker to predict whether individual rheumatoid arthritis patients are likely to benefit from biologic medications or other drugs should be tried, a Mayo Clinic-led study shows. The protein, analyzed in blood tests, may help avoid trial and error with medications, sparing patients treatment delays and unnecessary side effects and expense. The research is among several Mayo Clinic studies presented at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting in Boston.
Rheumatology Research Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Sharon Theimer
newsbureau@mayo.edu
507-284-5005
Mayo Clinic

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Cancer Research
New imaging technique identifies receptors for targeted cancer therapy
Dartmouth researchers have developed a fluorescence imaging technique that can more accurately identify receptors for targeted cancer therapies without a tissue biopsy. They report on their findings in 'Quantitative in vivo immunohistochemistry of epidermal growth factor receptor using a receptor concentration imaging approach,' which was recently published in Cancer Research.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robin Dutcher
Robin.Dutcher@hitchcock.org
603-653-9056
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Genes & Development
Scientists uncover mechanism that controls the fitness of cells, impacting aging and disease
A novel looping mechanism that involves the end caps of DNA may help explain the aging of cells and how they initiate and transmit disease, according to new research from UT Southwestern Medical Center cell biologists.
NIH/National Institute of Aging, Lung Cancer Specialized Programs of Research Excellence, Austrian Science Fund, American Federation for Aging Research

Contact: Russell Rian
russell.rian@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Pharmaceutical Research
Chemical in coffee may help prevent obesity-related disease
Researchers at the University of Georgia have discovered that a chemical compound commonly found in coffee may help prevent some of the damaging effects of obesity.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dexi Liu
dliu@uga.edu
706-542-7385
University of Georgia

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Journal of the International AIDS Society
HIV risks high in Mexico City's male sex trade
The prevalence of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, and risky behavior are high among Mexico City's male sex workers, a new study reports. Among the findings is that sex workers can make 34.5 percent more money for forgoing condoms. The researchers hope to counteract that incentive with one of their own.
National Institutes of Health, Mexican National Center for HIV/AIDS Control and Prevention, Brown University

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Journal of the American Heart Association
New online calculator estimates cardiovascular disease risk
The new Healthy Heart Score developed by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health gives individuals an easy method to estimate their 20-year risk of developing cardiovascular disease based on simple lifestyle habits.
American Heart Association/Clinical Research Program Award, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Todd Datz
tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8413
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Nonsmokers in automobiles are exposed to significant secondhand smoke
Nonsmokers sitting in an automobile with a smoker for one hour had markers of significantly increased levels of carcinogens and other toxins in their urine, indicating that secondhand smoke in motor vehicles poses a potentially major health risk according to a groundbreaking study led by University of California San Francisco researchers.
Flight Attendants Medical Research Institute, US Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Elizabeth Fernandez
elizabeth.fernandez@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3552.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

     
   

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