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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3512.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Dispositional mindfulness associated with better cardiovascular health
A new study that measured 'dispositional mindfulness' along with seven indicators of cardiovascular health found that persons reporting higher degrees of awareness of their present feelings and experiences had better health. The research suggests that interventions to improve mindfulness could benefit cardiovascular health, an idea researchers can test.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
Without swift influx of substantial aid, Ebola epidemic in Africa poised to explode
The Ebola virus disease epidemic already devastating swaths of West Africa will likely get far worse in the coming weeks and months unless international commitments are significantly and immediately increased, new research led by Yale researchers predicts.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1345
Yale University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell Reports
New insight on why people with Down syndrome invariably develop Alzheimer's disease
Researchers discover the cell events in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome that lead to the amyloid pathology observed in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. The findings support a novel approach to treating and preventing both diseases.
National Institutes of Health, Alzheimer's Association, Global Down Syndrome Foundation, American Assistance Foundation

Contact: Susan Gammon
sgammon@sanfordburnham.org
858-795-5012
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Florida lizards evolve rapidly, within 15 years and 20 generations
Scientists working on islands in Florida have documented the rapid evolution of a native lizard species -- in as little as 15 years -- as a result of pressure from an invading lizard species, introduced from Cuba.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Christine Sinatra
christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu
512-853-0506
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Study predicts that current international commitments will not contain Ebola outbreak in Montserrado, Liberia
New modeling research, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal, has found that the number of Ebola treatment center beds and other measures needed to control the epidemic in Montserrado County, Liberia substantially exceeds the total pledged by the international community to date.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Caroline Brogan
c.brogan@lancet.com
The Lancet

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
JAMA Ophthalmology
Progression of age-related macular degeneration in one eye then fellow eye
Having age-related macular degeneration in one eye was associated with an increased incidence of age-related macular degeneration and accelerated progression of the debilitating disease in the other eye.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Emily Kumlien
EKumlien@uwhealth.org
608-265-8199
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Diabetes Care
Mother's gestational diabetes linked to daughters being overweight later
Women who developed gestational diabetes and were overweight before pregnancy were at a higher risk of having daughters who were obese later in childhood, according to new research published today in Diabetes Care. Based on long-term research that included a multi-ethnic cohort of 421 girls and their mothers (all members of Kaiser Permanente Northern California), the study is among the first to directly link maternal hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) to offspring being overweight later.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Cyrus Hedayati
chedayati@golin.com
415-318-4377
Kaiser Permanente

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Chemistry and Biology
New TSRI studies bring scientists closer to combating dangerous unstable proteins
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have discovered a way to decrease deadly protein deposits in the heart, kidney and other organs associated with a group of human diseases called the systemic amyloid diseases.
Arlene & Arnold Goldstein, Ellison Medical Foundation, Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology at TSRI, Lita Annenberg Hazen Foundation, Scripps Research Institute, American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
Thyroid cancer genome analysis finds markers of aggressive tumors
A new comprehensive analysis of thyroid cancer from the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has identified markers of aggressive tumors, which could allow for better targeting of appropriate treatments to individual patients.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
PLOS Genetics
Gene identified for immune system reset after infection
Duke University researchers have uncovered the genes that are normally activated during recovery from bacterial infection. The finding, from C. elegans worms, could lead to ways to jumpstart this recovery process and possibly fend off autoimmune diseases and chronic inflammatory disorders that can result from the body staying in attack mode for too long.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
TSRI chemists achieve new technique with profound implications for drug development
A team from The Scripps Research Institute has established a new carbon-hydrogen activation technique that opens the door to creating a broader range of pure molecules of one-handedness or 'chirality' by eliminating previous starting material limitations.
National Institutes of Health, The Scripps Research Institute

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Children in high-quality early childhood education are buffered from changes in family income
A new Norwegian study shows that while losses in family income ought to predict increases in behavior problems for many children, attending high-quality early childhood centers offered protection against economic decline. The study looked at 75,000 children from birth through age 3, in addition to their families. In Norway, publicly subsidized high-quality early childhood education and care is available to all children, from low-income to affluent, starting at age 1.
Norwegian Ministry of Health, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorder and Stroke, Research Council of Norway.

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Two days later: Adolescents' conflicts with family spill over to school, vice versa
Family conflict and problems at school tend to occur together on the same day. A new study has found that these problems spill over in both directions for up to two days after. The study found that teens with more pronounced mental health symptoms, anxiety and depression, for example, are at risk for intensified spillover. The study followed over a hundred 13 to 17 year olds and their parents over a 14-day period.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Teens whose parents exert more psychological control have trouble with closeness, independence
A new longitudinal study has found that teens whose parents exerted psychological control over them at age 13 had problems establishing healthy friendships and romantic relationships both in adolescence and into adulthood. The study followed 184 ethnically and socioeconomically diverse teens from age 13 to 21. It found that giving in to 'peer pressure' was more common among teens whose parents used guilt, withdrawing love, fostering anxiety, or other psychologically manipulative tactics.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
University of Alaska Fairbanks reaches new heights with $23.8 million biomedical grant
The University of Alaska Fairbanks received a $23.8 million, five-year award from the National Institutes of Health to launch a new undergraduate program that will engage students from diverse backgrounds, especially those from rural Alaska, in biomedical research as a way to foster their interest and success in biomedical and health careers. The Biomedical Learning and Student Training program received the competitive award through NIH's Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity initiative, which awarded funding to 10 programs across the nation.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Meghan Murphy
mmmurphy3@alaska.edu
907-474-7541
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
UTMB researchers uncover powerful new class of weapons in the war on cancer
An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch, and Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have identified small molecules that can represent a new class of anticancer drugs with a novel target for the treatment of lung cancer. These findings are detailed in Nature Communications. A PCT patent was jointly documented by these two Institutes for the invention.
National Institutes of Health, Emory University, Flight Attendant Medical Research Institute

Contact: Donna Ramirez/Lisa Spence
lisa.FisherSpence@edelman.com
713-970-2145
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level
A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Marie Curie Outgoing Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Science Translational Medicine
A real-time tracking system developed to monitor dangerous bacteria inside the body
Combining a PET scanner with a new chemical tracer that selectively tags specific types of bacteria, Johns Hopkins researchers working with mice report they have devised a way to detect and monitor in real time infections with dangerous Gram-negative bacteria. These increasingly drug-resistant bacteria are responsible for a range of diseases, including fatal pneumonias and various bloodstream or solid-organ infections acquired in and outside the hospital.
National Institutes of Health, Harvard University Center for AIDS Research

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
epeshev1@jhmi.edu
410-502-9433
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nature
Fast modeling of cancer mutations
A new genome-editing technique enables rapid analysis of genes mutated in tumors.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ludwig Center for Molecular Oncology at MIT, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy
A new study conducted by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Tom Hughes
Tom.Hughes@unchealth.unc.edu
984-974-1151
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Nano Letters
Sopping up proteins with thermosponges
A research team led by Brigham and Women's Hospital has developed and tested a novel nanoparticle platform that efficiently delivers clinically important proteins in vivo in initial proof-of-concept tests.
Program of Excellence in Nanotechnology, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, David Koch-Prostate Cancer Foundation

Contact: Nicole Davis
nmdavisphd@gmail.com
617-823-3468
Brigham and Women's Hospital

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
SF State awarded $17 million by NIH to enhance workforce diversity in biomedical research
SF State has been awarded $17.04 million to address issues of workforce diversity in biomedical research, the National Institutes of Health announced. The effort is called SF BUILD, which stands for Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity. Professors in biology, chemistry/biochemistry, psychology and other fields at SF State working on the project seek to upend presuppositions about members of minority communities -- that they may not have the aptitude or background to excel in the sciences.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anthony Lazarus
lazarus@sfsu.edu
415-338-7108
San Francisco State University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Current Biology
Researchers record sight neurons in jumping spider brain
For the first time, a team of interdisciplinary researchers have made recordings of neurons associated with visual perception inside the poppy seed-sized brain of a jumping spider using a hair-sized tungsten recording electrode.
National Institutes of Health, Tri-Institutional Training Program in Computational Biology and Medicine

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Cancer
Quality of biopsy directly linked to survival in bladder cancer patients
UCLA researchers have shown for the first time that the quality of diagnostic staging using biopsy in patients with bladder cancer is directly linked with survival.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, STOP Cancer Foundation

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
Human skin cells reprogrammed directly into brain cells
Scientists have described a way to convert human skin cells directly into a specific type of brain cell affected by Huntington's disease, an ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Unlike other techniques that turn one cell type into another, this new process does not pass through a stem cell phase, avoiding the production of multiple cell types, report researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Mallinckrodt Jr. Foundation, Ellison Medical Foundation, Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineer

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Showing releases 76-100 out of 3512.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 > >>

     
   

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