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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 88.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Psychiatric Services
Public feels more negative toward drug addicts than mentally ill
People are significantly more likely to have negative attitudes toward those suffering from drug addiction than those with mental illness, and don't support insurance, housing and employment policies that benefit those dependent on drugs, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.
American International Group, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, Indiana University

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
BUSM researchers find NAS treatment needs standardization
When it comes to treating infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), researchers from Boston University School of Medicine believe the care for these infants should be consistent and objective, with standardized assessment tools and evidence to back up pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment choices.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Health Psychology
We drink more alcohol on gym days
A new Northwestern Medicine study finds that on days when people exercise more -- typically Thursdays to Sundays -- they drink more alcohol, too.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
Development and Psychopathology
Fighting parents hurt children's ability to recognize and regulate emotions
Exposure to verbal and physical aggression between parents may hurt a child's ability to identify and control emotions, according to a longitudinal study led by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@nyu.edu
212-998-6797
New York University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
To curb violent tendencies, start young
Aggressive children are less likely to become violent criminals or psychiatrically troubled adults if they receive intensive early intervention, say a new study based on more than two decades of research. The study from researchers at Duke and three other universities provides some of the strongest evidence yet that violent tendencies can be curbed.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, US Department of Education, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Alison Jones
Alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Marijuana users who feel low get high
Adolescents and young adults who smoke marijuana frequently may attempt to manage negative moods by using the drug, according to a study in September's Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institutes of Health

Contact: Erin Tornatore
erin.tornatore@childrens.harvard.edu
617-919-3110
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

Public Release: 11-Sep-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Puerto Ricans who inject drugs among Latinos at highest risk of contracting HIV
The study published in the American Journal of Public Health describes the epidemic and the availability of HIV prevention and treatment programs in areas with a high concentration of Puerto Ricans, in order to provide recommendations to reduce HIV in the population.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Cocaine rewires the brain: New study to unlock keys that could disrupt addiction
Why do cocaine addicts relapse after months or years of abstinence? The National Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded a University at Buffalo scientist a $2 million grant to conduct research that will provide some answers.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Ellen Goldbaum
goldbaum@buffalo.edu
716-645-4605
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
E-cigarettes may promote illicit drug use and addiction
Like conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes may function as a 'gateway drug' -- a drug that lowers the threshold for addiction to other substances, such as marijuana and cocaine -- according to the 120th Shattuck lecture, presented to the Massachusetts Medical Society by Columbia researchers Denise and Eric Kandel and published today in the online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@cumc.columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Estrogen increases cannabis sensitivity
Smoking today's concentrated pot might be risky business for women, according to new research from Washington State University. Psychology professor Rebecca Craft showed that, thanks to their estrogen levels, female rats are at least 30 percent more sensitive than males to the pain-relieving qualities of THC -- the key active ingredient in cannabis. Females also develop tolerance to THC more quickly. These sensitivities could increase vulnerability to negative side effects like anxiety, paranoia and addiction.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Rebecca Craft
craft@wsu.edu
509-335-5040
Washington State University

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Scripps Research Institute scientists link alcohol-dependence gene to neurotransmitter
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence. This signaling pathway is regulated by a gene, called neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1), which TSRI scientists found is linked with excessive drinking in mice. The new research shows Nf1 regulates gamma-aminobutyric acid, a neurotransmitter that lowers anxiety and increases feelings of relaxation.
National Institutes of Health, Pearson Center for Alcoholism and Addiction Research, NIH/Genes, Environment and Health Initiative, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors
Study finds less domestic violence among married couples who smoke pot
New research findings from a study of 634 couples found that the more often they smoked marijuana, the less likely they were to engage in domestic violence.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Cathy Wilde
cwilde@ria.buffalo.edu
716-887-3365
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 25-Aug-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
State medical marijuana laws linked to lower prescription overdose deaths
In states where it is legal to use medical marijuana to manage chronic pain and other conditions, the annual number of deaths from prescription drug overdose is 25 percent lower than in states where medical marijuana remains illegal, new research suggests.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
JAMA Neurology
Novel study maps infant brain growth in first 3 months of life using MRI technology
A recent study conducted by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the University of Hawaii demonstrates a new approach to measuring early brain development of infants, resulting in more accurate whole brain growth charts and providing the first estimates for growth trajectories of subcortical areas during the first three months after birth.
NIH/National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

Contact: Michelle Brubaker
mmbrubaker@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 7-Aug-2014
Kentucky professor develops new tool to prevent heroin deaths
A new, lifesaving product aimed at reducing the death toll from heroin abuse -- developed by a professor at the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy -- is in its final round of clinical trials and has received Fast Track designation by the Food and Drug Administration. The product, a nasal spray application of the anti-opioid drug naloxone, was developed by Daniel Wermeling, a professor of pharmacy practice and science.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation

Contact: Keith Hautala
keith.hautala@uky.edu
859-323-2396
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 3-Aug-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Small DNA modifications predict brain's threat response
Epigenetic changes to a gene that is well known for its involvement in clinical depression and posttraumatic stress disorder can affect the way a person's brain reacts to threats, according to a new study by Duke University researchers. The results may explain how the well-understood serotonin transporter leaves some individuals more vulnerable than others to stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders.
Duke University, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Dielmann Family, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Educational Researcher
Unintended consequences: More high school math, science linked to more dropouts
As US high schools beef up math and science requirements for graduation, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have found that more rigorous academics drive some students to drop out.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Washington University Institute for Public Health

Contact: Judy Martin
drydenj@wustl.edu
314-750-2413
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment
NYU CDUHR researchers look at prescription opioid abuse among young adults in NYC
The study explores within a social context the drug-use and sexual experiences of young adult nonmedical PO users as they relate to risk for HIV and HCV transmission.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: christopher james
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Veterans' alcohol problems linked to stress on the home front
Regardless of traumatic events experienced during deployment, returning National Guard soldiers were more likely to develop a drinking problem if faced with civilian life setbacks, including job loss, legal problems, divorce, and serious financial and legal problems -- all commonplace in military families. Results of the study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health are published online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
US Department of Defense, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Angela J. Beck
ajpmmedia@elsevier.com
734-764-8775
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Vets' alcohol problems linked to stress on the home front
Regardless of traumatic events experienced during deployment, returning National Guard soldiers were more likely to develop a drinking problem if faced with civilian life setbacks, including job loss, legal problems, divorce, and serious financial and legal problems -- all commonplace in military families. Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found having at least one civilian stressor or a reported incident of sexual harassment during deployment raised the odds of alcohol use disorders.
US Department of Defense, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Marijuana dependence alters the brain's response to drug paraphernalia
New research from The University of Texas at Dallas demonstrates that drug paraphernalia triggers the reward areas of the brain differently in dependent and non-dependent marijuana users. By letting users handle a marijuana pipe while in an fMRI, researchers found that areas of brain activation in the dependent users suggests a more emotional connection than in non-dependent users. Non-dependent users had greater activations in areas associated with memory and attention.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Ben Porter
ben.porter@utdallas.edu
972-883-2193
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Nicotine and Tobacco Research
Study: Smoking may contribute to suicide risk
Cigarette smokers are more likely to commit suicide than people who don't smoke, a relationship that has been attributed to the fact that numerous people with psychiatric disorders, who have higher suicide rates, also tend to smoke. But a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis finds that smoking itself may increase suicide risk and that policies to limit smoking reduce suicide rates.
American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society.

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Educational Researcher
Study finds unintended consequences of raising state math, science graduation requirements
Raising state-mandated math and science course graduation requirements may increase high school dropout rates without a meaningful effect on college enrollment or degree attainment, according to new research published in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Washington University Institute for Public Health

Contact: Tony Pals
tpals@aera.net
202-238-3233
American Educational Research Association

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Huntington's disease protein helps wire the young brain
A team led by Duke researchers has uncovered a surprising new role for the Huntington's disease protein: it helps wire connections in early brain development. Understanding more about how the protein works may help inform treatment for early stages of the disease.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Ruth K. Broad Biomedical Research Foundation, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
BMC study: Treat patients with addiction during, after hospitalization
The results of a new study demonstrate that starting hospitalized patients who have an opioid addiction on buprenorphine treatment in the hospital and seamlessly connecting them with an outpatient office based treatment program can greatly reduce whether they relapse after they are discharged.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Showing releases 1-25 out of 88.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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