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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 97.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Meth users face substantially higher risk for getting Parkinson's disease
In addition to incurring serious dental problems, memory loss and other physical and mental issues, methamphetamine users are three times more at risk for getting Parkinson's disease than non-illicit drug users, new research from the University of Utah and Intermountain Healthcare shows.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Phil Sahm
phil.sahm@hsc.utah.edu
801-581-2517
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
AIDS and Behavior
Occasional heroin use may worsen HIV infection
Researchers at Yale and Boston University and their Russian collaborators have found that occasional heroin use by HIV-positive patients may be particularly harmful to the immune system and worsens HIV disease, compared to persistent or no heroin use. The findings are published in the journal AIDS and Behavior.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists may treat alcohol dependence
Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptor proteins that regulate the expression of genes. PPAR agonists, which activate PPARs, are used to treat diabetes and elevated blood lipids. Mouse and human data suggest that PPAR agonists may be repurposed for treating alcohol dependence in humans.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health

Contact: R. Adron Harris, Ph.D.
harris@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-2514
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Nicotine & Tobacco Research
E-cigarettes less addictive than cigarettes
E-cigarettes appear to be less addictive than cigarettes for former smokers and this could help improve understanding of how various nicotine delivery devices lead to dependence, according to researchers.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, US Food and Drug Administration

Contact: Matt Solovey
msolovey@hmc.psu.edu
717-531-8606
Penn State

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Bradley Hasbro Research Center to study drug treatment program for girls in court system
Marina Tolou-Shams, Ph.D., a psychologist from the Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center, has received a $2 million grant to study the efficacy of a drug use intervention for court-involved, non-incarcerated girls who use illicit substances. The study, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, will compare the gender-responsive program's effect on reducing drug use and sexual risk behaviors relative to other community-based services that girls are typically referred to by the court.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jill Reuter
jreuter@lifespan.org
401-432-1328
Lifespan

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Neuropsychopharmacology
Brain activity after smokers quit predicts chances of relapsing, Penn study suggests
Quitting smoking sets off a series of changes in the brain that Penn Medicine researchers say may better identify smokers who will start smoking again.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Pennsylvania Department of Health

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Pain and itch in a dish
A team led by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute has found a simple method to convert human skin cells into the specialized neurons that detect pain, itch, touch and other bodily sensations. These neurons are also affected by spinal cord injury and involved in Friedreich's ataxia, a devastating and currently incurable neurodegenerative disease that largely strikes children.
Dorris Neuroscience Center, California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, Baxter Family Foundation, Del Webb Foundation, Norris Foundation, Las Patronas, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, and others

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Youths with a family history of substance use disorders have less efficient forebrain
Youths with a family history of alcohol and other drug use disorders have a greater risk of developing substance-use disorders (SUDs) themselves than their peers with no such family histories. A new study examines forebrain activity in youths with and without a family history of SUDs. Findings indicate that youths with a family history have forebrain regions that function less efficiently.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Neuroscience
TSRI researchers discover new type of neuron that plays key role in nicotine addiction
For decades, scientists thought drug addiction was the result of two systems in the brain -- the reward system, activated when a person used a drug, and the stress system, which kicked in during withdrawal. Now scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found these two systems are actually linked. Their findings show that in the core of the brain's reward system are specific neurons that are active both with use of and withdrawal from nicotine.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism, Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive & Kidney Diseases, and others

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 16-Nov-2014
American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014
Secondhand marijuana smoke may damage blood vessels as much as tobacco smoke
Secondhand marijuana smoke may have similar cardiovascular effects as tobacco smoke. Lab rats exposed to secondhand marijuana smoke had a 70 percent drop in blood vessel function.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Elfenworks Foundation

Contact: Darcy Spitz
darcy.spitz@heart.org
212-878-5940
American Heart Association

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Neuropsychopharmacology
Study finds Alzheimer's drug may reduce the urge to binge eat
The Alzheimer's drug memantine may perform double-duty helping binge eaters control their compulsion. Researchers have demonstrated that memantine, a neuroprotective drug, may reduce the addictive and impulsive behavior associated with binge eating.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health Peter Paul Career Development Professorship, McManus Charitable Trust

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Clinical Infectious Diseases
HIV-infected adults diagnosed with age-related diseases at similar ages as uninfected
New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that HIV-infected adults are at a higher risk for developing heart attacks, kidney failure and cancer. But, contrary to what many had believed, the researchers say these illnesses are occurring at similar ages as adults who are not infected with HIV.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, and more

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
JAMA Pediatrics
Overall risk of birth defects appears low for women taking antiretrovirals during early pregnancy
Among pregnant women infected with HIV, the use of antiretroviral medications early in pregnancy to treat their HIV or to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV does not appear to increase the risk of birth defects in their infants, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development,NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, and others

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study shows marijuana's long-term effects on the brain
The effects of chronic marijuana use on the brain may depend on age of first use and duration of use, according to researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas. In a paper published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), researchers for the first time comprehensively describe existing abnormalities in brain function and structure of long-term marijuana users with multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Shelly Kirkland
shelly.kirkland@utdallas.edu
972-883-3221
Center for BrainHealth

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
JAMA Pediatrics
Is violent injury a chronic disease? Study suggests so & may aid efforts to stop the cycle
Teens and young adults who get seriously injured in an assault are nearly twice as likely as their peers to end up back in the emergency room for a violent injury within the next two years, a new University of Michigan study finds. The researchers call this repeating pattern of violent injury a reoccurring disease, but their landmark study also suggests potentially powerful opportunities to intervene in ways that could stop the cycle.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Neuron
Why scratching makes you itch more
Turns out your mom was right: scratching an itch only makes it worse. New research from scientists at the Center for the Study of Itch at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis reveals that scratching causes the brain to release serotonin, which intensifies the itch sensation.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
UH research focuses on suicide resilience and vulnerability
Religious beliefs and practices may reduce thoughts of suicide among African-American adults in stressful life events induced by racial discrimination, according to a new research study conducted at the University of Houston.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Melissa Carroll
mcarroll@uh.edu
713-743-8153
University of Houston

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature Methods
Real-time readout of neurochemical activity
Scientists have created cells with fluorescent dyes that change color in response to specific neurochemicals. By implanting these cells into living mammalian brains, they have shown how neurochemical signaling changes as a food reward drives learning.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Hoffman-La Roche

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy
A new study conducted by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Tom Hughes
Tom.Hughes@unchealth.unc.edu
984-974-1151
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
For prescription drug addiction treatment, buprenorphine maintenance trumps detoxification
For treating patients with prescription opioid dependence in primary care, buprenorphine maintenance therapy is superior to detoxification, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers published in the Oct. 20 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Evolution and Human Behavior
'Red effect' sparks interest in female monkeys
Recent studies showed that the color red tends increase our attraction toward others, feelings of jealousy, and even reaction times. Now, new research shows that female monkeys also respond to the color red, suggesting that biology, rather than our culture, may play the fundamental role in our 'red' reactions.
The Sloan Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, University of Rochester

Contact: Monique Patenaude
monique.patenaude@rochester.edu
585-276-3693
University of Rochester

Public Release: 10-Oct-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
In-home visits reduce drug use, depression in pregnant teens
Intensive parenting and health education provided in homes of pregnant American Indian teens reduced the mothers' illegal drug use, depression and behavior problems, and set their young children on track to meet behavioral and emotional milestones they may have otherwise missed.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
University of Chicago establishes national center to study genetics of drug abuse in rats
The National Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded the University of Chicago a $12 million, five year grant to establish a national Center of Excellence to study drug abuse-associated behaviors by conducting research with rats. The NIDA Center for Genome-Wide Association Studies in Outbred Rats will combine complex behavioral studies with recent technological advances in rat genetics to help scientists shed light on the genes behind drug addiction.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Academic Medicine
Online intervention tool for physician trainees may improve care of substance users
Online learning interventions and small group debriefings can improve medical residents' attitudes and communication skills toward patients with substance use disorders, and may result in improved care for these patients, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University College of Medicine published online in Academic Medicine.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Anna Duerr
anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-8369
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Sesame Street teaches physicians a lesson
More than two million people are incarcerated in the United States, the world's highest incarceration rate. Scott A. Allen, M.D., a professor of medicine in the School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside, and two colleagues report in Annals of Internal Medicine that while many people need to be in prison for the safety of society, a majority are incarcerated due to behaviors linked to treatable diseases such as mental illness and addiction.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/Centers for AIDS Research

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Showing releases 1-25 out of 97.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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