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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 93.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Health and social inequities drives HIV in young men who have sex with other men
NYU researchers sought to identify the factors associated with incident HIV infection among a cohort of racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse YMSM.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: christopher james
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Substance abuse risk not greater in those using medical marijuana with prescribed opioids
Among people who use medical cannabis for chronic pain, those who also take prescription pain medications are not at increased risk for serious alcohol and other drug involvement, according to a study in the May issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Lisa Raycraft
raycraft@umich.edu
734-763-9534
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

Public Release: 13-May-2015
Neuropsychopharmacology
Brains of smokers who quit successfully might be wired for success
Smokers who are able to quit might actually be hard-wired for success, according to a study from Duke Medicine. The study, published in Neuropsychopharmacology, showed greater connectivity among certain brain regions in people who successfully quit smoking compared to those who tried and failed.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Scripps Florida scientists win $2.4 million to expand development of new pain therapies
Scientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute have been awarded $2.4 million from the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health to expand development of new pain medications with fewer side effects than those currently available.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Neuron
Light -- not pain-killing drugs -- used to activate brain's opioid receptors
Washington University School of Medicine neuroscientists have attached the light-sensing protein rhodopsin to opioid receptor parts to activate the receptor pathways using light from a laser fiber-optic device. They also influenced the behavior of mice using light, rather than drugs, to activate the reward response.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Journal of Perinatology
Vanderbilt study shows babies born with drug withdrawal symptoms on the rise
The number of infants born in the United States with drug withdrawal symptoms, also known as neonatal abstinence syndrome, nearly doubled in a four-year period. By 2012, one infant was born every 25 minutes in the US with the syndrome, accounting for $1.5 billion in annual health care charges, according to a new Vanderbilt study published in the Journal of Perinatology.
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
Improved sanitation may reduce sexual violence in South African townships
Improving access to public toilets in South African urban settlements may reduce both the incidence of sexual assaults by nearly 30 percent and the overall cost to society, a study by researchers at the Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Management found.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Michael Greenwood
michael.greenwood@yale.edu
203-737-5151
Yale University

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting
Lancet Psychiatry
Victims of bullying fare worse in the long run than maltreated children
Children who have been bullied by peers have similar or worse long-term mental health outcomes than children maltreated by adults, according to a study to be presented Tuesday, April 28, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego, and to be published in The Lancet Psychiatry at the same time.
Economic and Social Research Council, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, William T. Grant Foundation

Contact: Debbie Jacobson
djacobson@aap.org
847-434-7084
American Academy of Pediatrics

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
Researchers win $3.9 million in grants to study brain regions that suppress addiction cravings
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have been awarded two grants to study brain mechanisms that actively suppress relapse associated with cocaine and alcohol addiction. The studies will be funded by grants worth more than $2.1 million from the National Institute of Health's National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and $1.7 million from the agency's National Institute on Drug Abuse.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Behavioral Sciences and the Law
Nearly 1 in 10 adults have impulsive anger issues and access to guns
An estimated 9 percent of adults in the US have a history of impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns, according to a study published this month in Behavioral Sciences and the Law. The study also found that an estimated 1.5 percent of adults report impulsive anger and carry firearms outside their homes.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, John W. Alden Trust, Elizabeth K. Dollard Trust

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Pediatrics
Young guns: Study finds high firearm violence rate in high-risk youth after assault injury
Two young men sit in an inner-city emergency room. One is getting care for injuries he suffered in a fight, the other, for a sore throat. After getting care, both head back out to an environment of violence and poverty. But, a new study finds, the one who had been in a fight will have a nearly 60 percent chance of becoming involved in a violent incident involving a firearm within the next two years.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Annals of Internal Medicine
BMC study: New Hepatitis C treatments cost-effective, but only for selected patients
A study led by Boston Medical Center researchers demonstrates that while new therapies to treat Hepatitis C Virus are highly effective, they are cost-effective and provide the greatest value in specific groups of HCV-infected patients.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease

Contact: Elissa Snook
elissa.snook@bmc.org
617-638-6823
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Intergenerational transmission of abuse and neglect more complicated than previously believed
A study led by Cathy Spatz Widom, Distinguished Professor of Psychology at John Jay College, found that offspring of parents with histories of child abuse and neglect are themselves at risk for childhood neglect and sexual abuse but not physical abuse. Titled 'Intergenerational Transmission of Child Abuse and Neglect: Real or Detection Bias?' the study's findings were reported in the March 27 issue of the journal Science.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institute of Justice, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Doreen Vinas-Pineda
dvinas@jjay.cuny.edu
212-237-8645
John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
AIDS
For most children with HIV and low immune cell count, cells rebound after treatment
Most children with HIV who have low levels of a key immune cell eventually recover levels of this cell after they begin treatment.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/Office of AIDS Research, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
American Journal of Public Health
Suspension leads to more pot use among teens, study finds
The study found that students attending schools with suspension policies for illicit drug use were 1.6 times more likely than their peers at schools without such policies to use marijuana in the next year -- and that was the case with the student body as a whole, not just those who were suspended. By contrast, those attending schools with policies of sending marijuana users to a school counselor were 50 percent less likely to use the drug.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, Victorian Government's Operational Infrastructure Support Program

Contact: Deborah Bach
bach2@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Addictive Behaviors
Gender and race influences when teens start drinking, smoking and doing drugs
Cigarette use among white teenagers is substantially higher than among black and Hispanic teenagers, especially at 18 years old, according to Penn State researchers.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Victoria M. Indivero
vmi1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 9-Mar-2015
Substance Use and Misuse
Study shows teens and adults hazy on Washington marijuana law
Research by the University of Washington and Boys Town Research Institute found that only 57 percent of Washington parents surveyed knew the legal age for recreational marijuana use and just 63 percent knew that homegrown marijuana is illegal under the law.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Deborah Bach
bach2@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Journal of Medical Internet Research
Twitter helps smokers kick the habit, UCI-Stanford study finds
When subjects in a smoking cessation program tweet each other regularly, they're more successful at kicking the habit, according to a study by UC Irvine and Stanford University researchers. Specifically, daily 'automessages' that encourage and direct the social media exchanges may be more effective than traditional social media interventions for quitting smoking.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Anne Warde
awarde@uci.edu
949-824-7922
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
NYU study identifies teens at-risk for synthetic marijuana use
A new NYU study is one of the first national studies to examine risk factors for use of synthetic marijuana among a large, nationally representative sample of teens.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Epigenome orchestrates embryonic development
Studying zebrafish embryos, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that the epigenome plays a significant part in guiding development in the first 24 hours after fertilization. The research, which appears in the journal Nature Communications, may deepen understanding of congenital defects and miscarriage.
Washington University McDonnell International Scholars Program, Kwanjeong Educational Foundation, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, March of Dimes Foundation, American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
High-powered X-ray laser unlocks mechanics of pain relief without addiction
Scientists have solved the structure of a bifunctional peptide bound to a neuroreceptor that offers pain relief without addiction.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, and others

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
CWRU receives $2.5 million NIDA grant to study prenatal cocaine exposure on young adults
Since 1994, researchers at Case Western Reserve University's Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences have studied children prenatally exposed to cocaine and their mothers to track their development from birth through adolescence. With a four-year, $2.5 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health, those children -- now young adults -- enter the next phase of the long-term study, called Project Newborn.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Pediatrics
Teens increasingly sleep deprived
A latest study found that female students, racial/ethnic minorities, and students of lower socioeconomic status are less likely to report regularly getting seven or more hours of sleep each night compared with their male counterparts, non-Hispanic white teenagers, and students of higher socioeconomic status, respectively. The largest decrease in the percentage getting seven hours of sleep per night was 15-year-olds, a particularly concerning trend for students at this important juncture in development.
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
PLOS ONE
UCI, Italian scientists limit accelerated cellular aging caused by methamphetamine use
The ravaged faces of methamphetamine addicts tell a terrible tale -- abusing the drug dramatically accelerates aging. Now scientists from UC Irvine and the Italian Institute of Technology have discovered how this occurs at the cellular level and identified methods to limit the process.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-285-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Temple researchers receive $7.4 million grant to explore brain impairment in HIV patients
Researchers at Temple University School of Medicine have been awarded a $7.4 million, five-year grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to determine how cocaine and HIV-1 interact to cause brain impairment in patients infected with HIV. Kamel Khalili, Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Neuroscience and Director of Temple's Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center, will lead a team examining how cocaine worsens the neurological deficits that can plague HIV patients as they age.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jeremy Walter
Jeremy.Walter@tuhs.temple.edu
215-707-7882
Temple University Health System

Showing releases 1-25 out of 93.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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