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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 94.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Molecular Psychiatry
Team advances therapy preventing addiction relapse by erasing drug-associated memories
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have made a discovery that brings them closer to a new therapy based on selectively erasing dangerous and tenacious drug-associated memories. A new study demonstrates the effectiveness of a single injection of an early drug candidate called blebbistatin in preventing relapse in animal models of methamphetamine addiction.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute for Mental Health, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 4-Aug-2015
Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Opioid use and sexual violence among drug-using young adults in NYC
The research seeks to identify the potential role of drug use in increasing risk of sexual violence among young adult opioid users in NYC, and to identify the specific social and contextual factors surrounding this group's experiences of sexual violence.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Tobacco and Nicotine Research
Novel model developed to predict the amount of nicotine emitted from e-cigarettes
Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center researchers at the VCU Center for the Study of Tobacco Products have developed the first ever, evidence-based model that can predict with up to 90 percent accuracy the amount of nicotine emitted by an electronic cigarettes.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Center for Tobacco Products of the US Food and Drug Administration, Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center

Contact: Stevi Antosh
slantosh@vcu.edu
804-628-4578
Virginia Commonwealth University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2015
American Journal of Public Health
Early prosocial behavior good predictor of kids' future
Kindergarteners' social-emotional skills are a significant predictor of their future education, employment and criminal activity, among other outcomes, according to Penn State researchers.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, US Department of Education, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention

Contact: Victoria M. Indivero
vmi1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Addiction
Low-nicotine cigarettes fail to sway smokers
Smokers who successfully lowered their nicotine intake when they were switched to low-nicotine cigarettes were unable to curb their smoking habits in the long term, according to a study by researchers at UCSF and San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, FDA Center for Tobacco Products

Contact: Suzanne Leigh
suzanne.leigh@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Journal of Adolescent Health
Teens' overall substance use declining, but marijuana use rising
Marijuana use in teenagers is on the rise, while cigarette and alcohol use are stable or declining, according to health statistics researchers. In particular, black teens are using more marijuana than in recent decades.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Victoria Indiverno
vmi1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Cell
Device delivers drugs to brain via remote control
Tiny, implantable devices are capable of delivering light or drugs to specific areas of the brain, potentially improving drug delivery to targeted regions of the brain and reducing side effects. Eventually, the devices may be used to treat pain, depression, epilepsy and other neurological disorders in people.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Common Fund of the National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
SLU scientist awarded special NIH grant to solve painkiller problem
SLU pain researcher Daniela Salvemini has been awarded the NIH's Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award to solve an alarming problem: pain killers that are capable of quelling terrible pain also carry debilitating side effects and significant risk of addiction.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Carrie Bebermeyer
bebermcl@slu.edu
314-977-8015
Saint Louis University

Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
JAMA Psychiatry
Study links success in adulthood to childhood psychiatric health
Children with even mild or passing bouts of depression, anxiety and/or behavioral issues were more inclined to have serious problems that complicated their ability to lead successful lives as adults, according to research from Duke Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, William T. Grant Foundation

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Radiology
Substance abuse is associated with lower brain volume in women but not in men
A new study by a team of researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine on the Anschutz Medical Campus found that long-term stimulant abuse had more significant effects on brain volume in women compared with men. 'While the women previously dependent on stimulants demonstrated widespread brain differences when compared to their healthy control counterparts, the men demonstrated no significant brain differences,' said Jody Tanabe, M.D., professor of radiology.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Mark Couch
mark.couch@ucdenver.edu
303-724-5377
University of Colorado Denver

Public Release: 13-Jul-2015
Journal of Pediatrics
Baby's first stool can alert doctors to future cognitive issues, new CWRU study finds
A newborn's first stool can signal the child may struggle with persistent cognitive problems, according to Case Western Reserve University Project Newborn researchers. In particular, high levels of fatty acid ethyl esters found in the meconium (a newborn's first stool) from a mother's alcohol use during pregnancy can alert doctors that a child is at risk for problems with intelligence and reasoning.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Current Biology
A new wrinkle: Geometry of brain's outer surface correlates with genetic heritage
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego and the School of Medicine have found that the three-dimensional shape of the cerebral cortex -- the wrinkled outer layer of the brain controlling many functions of thinking and sensation -- strongly correlates with ancestral background. The study opens the door to more precise studies of brain anatomy going forward and could eventually lead to more personalized medicine approaches for diagnosing and treating brain diseases.
PING, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Bonnie Ward
bjward@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
CWRU researchers link prenatal cocaine exposure to adolescents engaging in sex by age 15
Since 1994, researchers at Case Western Reserve University have studied mothers -- some who used cocaine while pregnant and others who did not -- to understand how the drug affected their children's cognitive and social development. Their latest findings suggest a link between prenatal cocaine exposure and an adolescent's likelihood to have sexual intercourse before age 15.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Molecular Psychiatry
Medication may stop drug and alcohol addiction
Researchers have successfully stopped cocaine and alcohol addiction in experiments using a drug already approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat high blood pressure.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 9-Jun-2015
Health Affairs
Physician waivers to prescribe buprenorphine increases potential access to treatment
In the past, many people living in rural counties have had no practical way to get treatment for opioid addiction. This study shows that the increased number and geographic distribution of physicians obtaining waivers to prescribe buprenorphine has widened potential access to effective treatment for those with addiction to heroin or prescription painkillers.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Kirsten Holguin
media@rand.org
310-451-6913
RAND Corporation

Public Release: 9-Jun-2015
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Clinicians reluctant to prescribe medication that counteracts effects of opioid overdose
A variety of factors including questions about risk and reluctance to offend patients limits clinician willingness to prescribe a potentially life-saving medication that counteracts the effects of an opioid overdose, according to a Kaiser Permanente Colorado study published today in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Navneet Miller
navneet.miller@creation.io
415-262-5972
Kaiser Permanente

Public Release: 8-Jun-2015
SNMMI 2015 Annual Meeting
PET reveals inflammatory cycle in the brain
Neuroinflammation caused by a reactive immune system could be tripping off the neurodegeneration seen in certain dementias, multiple sclerosis, and other deadly diseases of the nervous system. A novel molecular imaging technique could be the key to understanding how best to treat these and other devastating diseases, according to a recent study presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI).
University of California Berkeley, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Laurie Callahan
lcallahan@snmmi.org
703-652-6773
Society of Nuclear Medicine

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Health and social inequities drives HIV in young men who have sex with other men
NYU researchers sought to identify the factors associated with incident HIV infection among a cohort of racially/ethnically and socioeconomically diverse YMSM.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: christopher james
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Substance abuse risk not greater in those using medical marijuana with prescribed opioids
Among people who use medical cannabis for chronic pain, those who also take prescription pain medications are not at increased risk for serious alcohol and other drug involvement, according to a study in the May issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Lisa Raycraft
raycraft@umich.edu
734-763-9534
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

Public Release: 13-May-2015
Neuropsychopharmacology
Brains of smokers who quit successfully might be wired for success
Smokers who are able to quit might actually be hard-wired for success, according to a study from Duke Medicine. The study, published in Neuropsychopharmacology, showed greater connectivity among certain brain regions in people who successfully quit smoking compared to those who tried and failed.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Scripps Florida scientists win $2.4 million to expand development of new pain therapies
Scientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute have been awarded $2.4 million from the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health to expand development of new pain medications with fewer side effects than those currently available.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Neuron
Light -- not pain-killing drugs -- used to activate brain's opioid receptors
Washington University School of Medicine neuroscientists have attached the light-sensing protein rhodopsin to opioid receptor parts to activate the receptor pathways using light from a laser fiber-optic device. They also influenced the behavior of mice using light, rather than drugs, to activate the reward response.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Journal of Perinatology
Vanderbilt study shows babies born with drug withdrawal symptoms on the rise
The number of infants born in the United States with drug withdrawal symptoms, also known as neonatal abstinence syndrome, nearly doubled in a four-year period. By 2012, one infant was born every 25 minutes in the US with the syndrome, accounting for $1.5 billion in annual health care charges, according to a new Vanderbilt study published in the Journal of Perinatology.
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
Improved sanitation may reduce sexual violence in South African townships
Improving access to public toilets in South African urban settlements may reduce both the incidence of sexual assaults by nearly 30 percent and the overall cost to society, a study by researchers at the Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Management found.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Michael Greenwood
michael.greenwood@yale.edu
203-737-5151
Yale University

Public Release: 28-Apr-2015
Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting
Lancet Psychiatry
Victims of bullying fare worse in the long run than maltreated children
Children who have been bullied by peers have similar or worse long-term mental health outcomes than children maltreated by adults, according to a study to be presented Tuesday, April 28, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego, and to be published in The Lancet Psychiatry at the same time.
Economic and Social Research Council, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, William T. Grant Foundation

Contact: Debbie Jacobson
djacobson@aap.org
847-434-7084
American Academy of Pediatrics

Showing releases 1-25 out of 94.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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