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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 97.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Epigenome orchestrates embryonic development
Studying zebrafish embryos, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that the epigenome plays a significant part in guiding development in the first 24 hours after fertilization. The research, which appears in the journal Nature Communications, may deepen understanding of congenital defects and miscarriage.
Washington University McDonnell International Scholars Program, Kwanjeong Educational Foundation, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, March of Dimes Foundation, American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
High-powered X-ray laser unlocks mechanics of pain relief without addiction
Scientists have solved the structure of a bifunctional peptide bound to a neuroreceptor that offers pain relief without addiction.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, and others

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
CWRU receives $2.5 million NIDA grant to study prenatal cocaine exposure on young adults
Since 1994, researchers at Case Western Reserve University's Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences have studied children prenatally exposed to cocaine and their mothers to track their development from birth through adolescence. With a four-year, $2.5 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health, those children -- now young adults -- enter the next phase of the long-term study, called Project Newborn.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Pediatrics
Teens increasingly sleep deprived
A latest study found that female students, racial/ethnic minorities, and students of lower socioeconomic status are less likely to report regularly getting seven or more hours of sleep each night compared with their male counterparts, non-Hispanic white teenagers, and students of higher socioeconomic status, respectively. The largest decrease in the percentage getting seven hours of sleep per night was 15-year-olds, a particularly concerning trend for students at this important juncture in development.
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
PLOS ONE
UCI, Italian scientists limit accelerated cellular aging caused by methamphetamine use
The ravaged faces of methamphetamine addicts tell a terrible tale -- abusing the drug dramatically accelerates aging. Now scientists from UC Irvine and the Italian Institute of Technology have discovered how this occurs at the cellular level and identified methods to limit the process.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-285-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 10-Feb-2015
Temple researchers receive $7.4 million grant to explore brain impairment in HIV patients
Researchers at Temple University School of Medicine have been awarded a $7.4 million, five-year grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to determine how cocaine and HIV-1 interact to cause brain impairment in patients infected with HIV. Kamel Khalili, Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Neuroscience and Director of Temple's Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center, will lead a team examining how cocaine worsens the neurological deficits that can plague HIV patients as they age.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jeremy Walter
Jeremy.Walter@tuhs.temple.edu
215-707-7882
Temple University Health System

Public Release: 9-Feb-2015
CWRU awarded $3.9 million for innovative HIV research
A researcher at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has been awarded $3.9 million to determine if gut leakage caused by human immunodeficiency virus leads to disease and malfunction of vital organs commonly found in HIV patients, whether drug abuse exacerbates the problem, how to fix the leaks and whether gut repair improves overall health.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 4-Feb-2015
Neuropsychopharmacology
Researchers identify peptide that reduces urge to eat
Researchers have identified a peptide and hormone that when administered to a specific area of the brain may reduce the desire for food. The study, which appears in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, may one day lead to medications that treat obesity and binge eating disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Peter Paul Career Development Professorship, Peter McManus Charitable Trust, Boston University

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Journal of Neuroscience
Cocaine users have impaired ability to predict loss
Cocaine addicted individuals may continue their habit despite unfavorable consequences like imprisonment or loss of relationships because their brain circuits responsible for predicting emotional loss are impaired, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in The Journal of Neuroscience.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Mental Health

Contact: Sasha Walek
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 29-Jan-2015
Studies in Mycology
Researchers provide insights for reducing drug overdoses through community education
Results from a new study show that participants in drug overdose education programs tend to be parents (mostly mothers) who provide financial support for their son/daughter, have daily contact with their loved one, have applied for court-mandated treatment and have witnessed an overdose.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 22-Jan-2015
Journal of Adolescent Health
Pro-marijuana 'tweets' are sky-high on Twitter
Analyzing every marijuana-related Twitter message sent during a one-month period in early 2014, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have found that the 'Twitterverse' is a pot-friendly place. In that time, more than 7 million tweets referenced marijuana, with 15 times as many pro-pot tweets sent as anti-pot tweets.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Injury Epidemiology
Half of young victims of fatal crashes in 9 US states used alcohol or marijuana
Half of young drivers who died in car crashes in US states such as California, Hawaii and West Virginia were under the influence of either alcohol or marijuana, or both. This is according to the statistics for fatal road accidents involving 16- to 25-year-olds in nine US states. Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health analyzed the data to gauge how possible policy changes could influence substance use among adolescents and young adults.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Center for Disease Control

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Lancet Respiratory Medicine
How quickly smokers metabolize nicotine may point to most effective way to quit
In a first-of-its-kind randomized clinical trial, researchers from Penn Medicine and collaborators have shown that the most-suited treatment for each smoker may depend on how quickly they metabolize the nicotine in their body after quitting.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 8-Jan-2015
Addictive Behaviors
Alcohol warnings from parents matter
Parenting practices and restrictions when it comes to alcohol use can make a difference with adolescent drinking, and there is considerable value to consistent and sustained parental attitudes about drinking, according to new research by a University at Buffalo psychologist.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Bert Gambini
gambini@buffalo.edu
716-645-5334
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management
Children's vulnerability reflected in genes
Some children are more sensitive to their environments, for better and for worse. Now Duke University researchers have identified a gene variant that may serve as a marker for these children, who are among society's most vulnerable. The study found that children from high-risk backgrounds who carried a common gene variant were very likely to develop serious problems as adults, but were also more responsive to treatment.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Insitute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Department of Educat

Contact: Alison Jones
Alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8052
Duke University

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Injury Epidemiology
Drug overdose epidemic to recede soon
Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health project that the drug overdose epidemic will peak at about 50,000 annual deaths in 2017 before declining to a non-epidemic state of approximately 6,000 deaths in the year 2035 -- at roughly the same rate seen before the start of the epidemic. Results appear online in the journal Injury Epidemiology.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control

Contact: Timothy Paul
tp2111@columbia.edu
212-305-2676
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Could playing Tchaikovsky's 'Nutcracker' and other music improve kids' brains?
In a study called 'the largest investigation of the association between playing a musical instrument and brain development,' Medicine Vermont child psychiatry team has found that musical training might also help kids focus their attention, control their emotions and diminish their anxiety.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Contact: Jennifer Nachbur
jennifer.nachbur@uvm.edu
802-338-8316
University of Vermont

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Meth users face substantially higher risk for getting Parkinson's disease
In addition to incurring serious dental problems, memory loss and other physical and mental issues, methamphetamine users are three times more at risk for getting Parkinson's disease than non-illicit drug users, new research from the University of Utah and Intermountain Healthcare shows.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Phil Sahm
phil.sahm@hsc.utah.edu
801-581-2517
University of Utah Health Sciences

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
AIDS and Behavior
Occasional heroin use may worsen HIV infection
Researchers at Yale and Boston University and their Russian collaborators have found that occasional heroin use by HIV-positive patients may be particularly harmful to the immune system and worsens HIV disease, compared to persistent or no heroin use. The findings are published in the journal AIDS and Behavior.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 10-Dec-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists may treat alcohol dependence
Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptor proteins that regulate the expression of genes. PPAR agonists, which activate PPARs, are used to treat diabetes and elevated blood lipids. Mouse and human data suggest that PPAR agonists may be repurposed for treating alcohol dependence in humans.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health

Contact: R. Adron Harris, Ph.D.
harris@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-2514
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Nicotine & Tobacco Research
E-cigarettes less addictive than cigarettes
E-cigarettes appear to be less addictive than cigarettes for former smokers and this could help improve understanding of how various nicotine delivery devices lead to dependence, according to researchers.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, US Food and Drug Administration

Contact: Matt Solovey
msolovey@hmc.psu.edu
717-531-8606
Penn State

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Bradley Hasbro Research Center to study drug treatment program for girls in court system
Marina Tolou-Shams, Ph.D., a psychologist from the Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center, has received a $2 million grant to study the efficacy of a drug use intervention for court-involved, non-incarcerated girls who use illicit substances. The study, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, will compare the gender-responsive program's effect on reducing drug use and sexual risk behaviors relative to other community-based services that girls are typically referred to by the court.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jill Reuter
jreuter@lifespan.org
401-432-1328
Lifespan

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Neuropsychopharmacology
Brain activity after smokers quit predicts chances of relapsing, Penn study suggests
Quitting smoking sets off a series of changes in the brain that Penn Medicine researchers say may better identify smokers who will start smoking again.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Pennsylvania Department of Health

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Pain and itch in a dish
A team led by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute has found a simple method to convert human skin cells into the specialized neurons that detect pain, itch, touch and other bodily sensations. These neurons are also affected by spinal cord injury and involved in Friedreich's ataxia, a devastating and currently incurable neurodegenerative disease that largely strikes children.
Dorris Neuroscience Center, California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, Baxter Family Foundation, Del Webb Foundation, Norris Foundation, Las Patronas, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, and others

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Youths with a family history of substance use disorders have less efficient forebrain
Youths with a family history of alcohol and other drug use disorders have a greater risk of developing substance-use disorders (SUDs) themselves than their peers with no such family histories. A new study examines forebrain activity in youths with and without a family history of SUDs. Findings indicate that youths with a family history have forebrain regions that function less efficiently.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Will Sansom
sansom@uthscsa.edu
210-567-2579

Showing releases 1-25 out of 97.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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