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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 83.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 12-May-2014
JAMA Pediatrics
Underage college men discount dangers of driving after marijuana use
The researchers say their findings probably reflect the widespread myth that driving after marijuana use is safe. The researchers suggest that developing strategies to combat this belief could help to change social norms and encourage using a designated driver not only after alcohol use, but after a driver has used any risky substance. Results are not surprising, but this study quantifies the prevalence, which is useful in setting priorities for public health action.
NIH/Common Fund, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Child Health

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bullying may have long-term health consequences
Bullied children may experience chronic, systemic inflammation that persists into adulthood, while bullies may actually reap health benefits of increasing their social status through bullying, according to researchers at Duke Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, William T. Grant Foundation, Economic and Social Research Council

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 9-May-2014
Neuron
Autism-related protein shown to play vital role in addiction
In a paper published in the latest issue of the neuroscience journal Neuron, McLean Hospital investigators report that a gene essential for normal brain development, and previously linked to Autism Spectrum Disorders, also plays a critical role in addiction-related behaviors.
Fragile X Association, Simons Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Scott O'Brien
sobrien12@partners.org
617-855-2110
McLean Hospital

Public Release: 6-May-2014
Journal of Adolescent Health
New 'magnifying glass' helps spot delinquency risks
Drug abuse, acts of rampage -- what's really the matter with kids today? While there are many places to lay blame -- family, attitude, peers, school, community -- a new study shows that those risks vary in intensity from kid to kid and can be identified.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Brittany Cooper
brittany.cooper@wsu.edu
509-335-2896
Washington State University

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Psychological Science
Individual brain activity predicts tendency to succumb to daily temptations
Activity in areas of the brain related to reward and self-control may offer neural markers that predict whether people are likely to resist or give in to temptations, like food, in daily life, according to research in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute, German Science Foundation

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Child Development
Working memory differs by parents' education; effects persist into adolescence
A new longitudinal study has found that differences in working memory- the ability to hold information in your mind, think about it, and use it to guide behavior -- that exist at age 10 persist through the end of adolescence. The study also found that parents' education -- one common measure of socioeconomic status -- is related to children's performance on tasks of working memory. The researchers studied more than 300 10- through 13-year-olds over four years.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
NYU Steinhardt researchers to study why male millennials risk HIV transmission
The number of new HIV infections in the United States had remained steady in recent years, but rates among urban millennial gay, bisexual, and other young men who have sex with men have steadily increased in the past decade. NYU researchers will study this population in order to better understand the reasons for this increase under a five-year, $3.1 million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Teens who use alcohol and marijuana together are at higher risk for unsafe driving
Teenagers who drink alcohol and smoke marijuana may be at increased risk for unsafe driving, according to a study in the May issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Yvonne M. Terry-McElrath
yterry@umich.edu
734-647-9142
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

Public Release: 25-Apr-2014
New Translational Addiction Sciences Center poised to make headway in treatment of addiction
The National Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded a five-year, $6.6 million grant to the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston to establish the Translational Addiction Sciences Center. The center will investigate the mechanisms underlying addiction with the goal of discovering and validating novel treatment options.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Maureen Balleza
maballez@utmb.edu
409-772-8785
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Cell Reports
New type of protein action found to regulate development
Johns Hopkins researchers report they have figured out how the aptly named protein Botch blocks the signaling protein called Notch, which helps regulate development. In a report on the discovery, to appear online April 24 in the journal Cell Reports, the scientists say they expect the work to lead to a better understanding of how a single protein, Notch, directs actions needed for the healthy development of organs as diverse as brains and kidneys.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Maryland Stem Cell Research Fund, McKnight Endowment Fund for Neuroscience Brain Disorders

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 19-Apr-2014
Preventive Medicine
Financial incentives help economically-disadvantaged pregnant smokers quit and improve fetal growth
Smoking prevalence varies by socioeconomic status -- particularly in terms of educational attainment -- putting economically-disadvantaged women at greater risk for smoking during pregnancy and related negative outcomes, including miscarriage, preterm birth, SIDS, and other later adverse effects. An approach using financial incentives has proven effective in increasing quitting and improving fetal growth among this population.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Jennifer Nachbur
jennifer.nachbur@uvm.edu
802-338-8316
University of Vermont

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Brain changes are associated with casual marijuana use in young adults
The size and shape of two brain regions involved in emotion and motivation may differ in young adults who smoke marijuana at least once a week, according to a study published April 16 in the Journal of Neuroscience. The findings suggest that recreational marijuana use may lead to previously unidentified brain changes, and highlight the importance of research aimed at understanding the long-term effects of low to moderate marijuana use on the brain.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Anne Nicholas
media@sfn.org
202-962-4086
Society for Neuroscience

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Computerized counseling reduces HIV-1 viral load, sexual transmission risk
New research shows that computerized counseling is a promising intervention for increased ART adherence and safer sex, especially for individuals with problems in these areas. This is the first intervention to report improved ART adherence, viral suppression, and reduced secondary sexual transmission risk behavior.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/ Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 10-Apr-2014
Vermont study addresses treatments for waited-listed opioid-dependent individuals
A new University of Vermont study focuses on the development of a novel interim treatment program featuring five components to help opioid-dependent Vermonters bridge challenging waitlist delays.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jennifer Nachbur
jennifer.nachbur@uvm.edu
802-656-7875
University of Vermont

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity
One in 10 male, same-sex Craigslist ads seek men who don't identify as gay
Online sexual hook-ups present a unique opportunity to explore many factors of decision-making that inform sexual health. A latest study conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the National Development and Research Institutes found evidence that men having sex with men use the Internet to find sexual partners who do not identify as gay, either to fulfill a fantasy or because it allows anonymous sexual encounters without discovery.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
For neurons in the brain, identity can be used to predict location
There are many types of neurons of neurons, defined largely by the patterns of genes they use, and they 'live' in distinct brain regions. But researchers do not yet have a comprehensive understanding of these neuronal types and how they are distributed in the brain. A team of scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory describes a new mathematical model that combines large data sets to predict where different types of cells are located within the brain.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jaclyn Jansen
jjansen@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Negative effects of joining a gang last long after gang membership ends
Joining a gang in adolescence has significant consequences in adulthood beyond criminal behavior, even after a person leaves the gang. Former gang members are more likely to be in poor health, receiving government assistance and struggling with drug abuse than someone who never joined a gang.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Mental Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundatio

Contact: Amanda Gilman
abg5@uw.edu
University of Washington

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Nicotine withdrawal weakens brain connections tied to self-control over cigarette cravings
A new brain imaging study in this week's JAMA Psychiatry from scientists in Penn Medicine and the National Institute on Drug Abuse Intramural Research Program shows how smokers suffering from nicotine withdrawal may have more trouble shifting from a key brain network -- known as default mode, when people are in a so-called 'introspective' state -- and into a control network that could help exert more self-control over cravings and to focus on quitting for good.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Mar-2014
Public Health Reports
Prescriptions for opioids stabilizing after fivefold increase in 10-year span
To support the appropriate use of opioids and inform public health interventions to prevent drug abuse, most states have implemented a prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP). Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health evaluated the impact of these state-wide programs and found that after tripling until 2007, annual rates of prescriptions for opioid analgesics have stabilized although the effects of PDMPs on opioid dispensing vary markedly by state.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 21-Feb-2014
Annals of Epidemiology
Reducing HIV transmission among drug injectors lowers AIDS mortality in heterosexuals
A recent study conducted by researchers from New York University's Center for Drug Use and HIV Research, led by Samuel R. Friedman, Director of both New York University's Center for Drug Use and HIV Research's interdisciplinary theoretical synthesis core, and the Institute for Infectious Disease Research at National Development and Research Institutes, sheds light on the pathways connecting HIV epidemics in different populations.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Public Health Solutions, National Development and Research Institutes

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2014
AIDS Education and Prevention
Researchers look to reduce hep C infections for injecting drug user
Researchers affiliated with New York University's Center for Drug Use and HIV Research are focusing on intervention strategies that highlight the lesser-known dangers of HCV transmission through the sharing of other injection equipment such as cookers, filters, drug-dilution water and water containers.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Preventive Medicine
In fight against teen prescription drug abuse, one-two punch wins
Programs that aim to curb teen prescription drug abuse have vastly differing success rates, ranging from big drops in drug abuse to no measurable effect, says a new study from researchers at Duke and Pennsylvania State universities. The best results came from pairing a school-based program with a home-based intervention, resulting in a 10 percent decrease in abuse rates. Most school-based programs were ineffective when used by themselves.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Alison Jones
Alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Journal of Adolescent Health
Data on today's youth reveal childhood clues for later risk of STDs
Here's yet another reason to focus on kids' early years. Children who grow up in well-managed households, enjoy school, and have friends who stay out of trouble report fewer sexually transmitted diseases in young adulthood, according to a new analysis.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Contact: Molly McElroy
mollywmc@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Psychological Science
After committing a crime, guilt and shame predict re-offense
Within three years of being released from jail, two out of every three inmates in the US wind up behind bars again -- a problem that contributes to the highest incarceration rate of any country in the world. New research suggests that the degree to which inmates' express guilt or shame may provide an indicator of how likely they are to re-offend.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Psychological Medicine
Smoking cessation may improve mental health
Although many health professionals who treat people with psychiatric problems overlook their patients' smoking habits, new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that people who struggle with mood problems or addiction can safely quit smoking and that kicking the habit is associated with improved mental health.
NIH/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, American Cancer Society

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Showing releases 26-50 out of 83.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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