NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIA SeniorHealth.gov NIH Podcast
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Radio
  NIH Podcasts
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 85.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 9-Aug-2013
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Cigarette taxation helps to reduce drinking among groups considered vulnerable
A new study has examined the effects of cigarette taxation on alcohol consumption. Results suggest that increases in cigarette taxes are associated with modest to moderate reductions in alcohol consumption among vulnerable groups. Vulnerable groups include hazardous drinkers, young adult smokers, and smokers in the lowest income category.
NIH/Office of Research on Women's Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Sherry McKee, Ph.D.
sherry.mckee@yale.edu
203-737-3529
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 5-Aug-2013
Journal of Adolescent Health
Abused children found to smoke more as teens and adults
Researchers have long suspected some kind of link between childhood abuse and smoking. But in an interesting twist, a new study from the University of Washington finds a connection not between whether or not an abused child will ever begin smoking, but to how much they smoke once they do start.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, others

Contact: Allison Kristman-Valente
ankv@uw.edu
206-685-1997
University of Washington

Public Release: 2-Aug-2013
Smoking abstinence research receives major financial boost
Warren Bickel, an internationally recognized addiction expert at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, recently received a $3.2-million grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for research on improving self-control in smokers seeking to quit cigarettes. The grant is for developing innovative new ways to enhance the smokers' ability to abstain from acting on their nicotine cravings.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Paula Byron
paulabyron@vt.edu
540-526-2027
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 1-Aug-2013
Cell
New insight into how brain 'learns' cocaine addiction
A team of researchers says it has solved the longstanding puzzle of why a key protein linked to learning is also needed to become addicted to cocaine. Results of the study, published in the Aug. 1 issue of the journal Cell, describe how the learning-related protein works with other proteins to forge new pathways in the brain in response to a drug-induced rush of the "pleasure" molecule dopamine.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Cancer Institute, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, US Department of Energy

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 30-Jul-2013
Journal of Pediatric Psychology
Childhood economic status affects substance use among young adults
Children who grow up in poverty are more likely than wealthier children to smoke cigarettes, but they are less likely to binge drink and are no more prone to use marijuana, according to researchers at Duke Medicine.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Sarah Avery
sarah.avery@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 30-Jul-2013
Child Development
Early school engagement helps youths avoid problem behaviors and eventual dropout
School engagement helps youths avoid problem behaviors and eventual dropout. Researchers surveyed 1,300 youths in seventh through eleventh grades over a seven-year period on topics including problem behaviors, school engagement, and relationships with parents and teachers. Findings suggest that behavioral, emotional, and cognitive engagement may help students cope with stressors, setbacks, and difficulties in school. Researchers also highlighted the importance of a supportive learning environment that allows students to feel competent and autonomous.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Sarah Mandell
smandell@srcd.org
202-289-7903
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 29-Jul-2013
Brain implant aims to stifle drug highs
Researchers at Case Western Reserve and Illinois State universities are investigating what happens in an animal brain when drugs of abuse provide no high. They are developing and testing a closed-loop system that detects changes in dopamine levels caused by a drug then suppresses reward-related signaling associated with a high. A $390,000 National Institute on Drug Abuse grant funds the work.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-368-4442
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 25-Jul-2013
PLOS Computational Biology
Analysis of 26 networked autism genes suggests functional role in the cerebellum
A team of scientists has obtained intriguing insights into two groups of autism candidate genes in the mammalian brain that new evidence suggests are functionally and spatially related. The newly published analysis identifies two networked groupings from 26 genes associated with autism that are overexpressed in the cerebellar cortex, in areas dominated by neurons called granule cells.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Jul-2013
Journal of Adolescent Health
Brothers and sisters learn to build positive relationships in SIBS Program
Little is known about how sibling relationships impact child and family functioning, but Penn State researchers are beginning to shed light on intervention strategies that can cultivate healthy and supportive sibling relationships.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 24-Jul-2013
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Combo hepatitis C prevention for young drug injectors urged
UC San Francisco researchers are recommending a combination of six comprehensive measures to prevent the spread of hepatitis C, in an effort to address the more than 31,000 young people they estimate may be newly infected with the virus each year in the United States due to injection-drug use.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Australian Department of Health and Ageing

Contact: Jeff Sheehy
jsheehy@ari.ucsf.edu
415-597-8165
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 22-Jul-2013
Prevention Science
Teen eating disorders increase suicide risk
Is binge eating a tell-tale sign of suicidal thoughts? According to a new study of African American girls published in Springer's journal Prevention Science, those who experience depressive and anxious symptoms are often dissatisfied with their bodies and more likely to display binge eating behaviors. These behaviors put them at higher risk for turning their emotions inward, in other words, displaying internalizing symptoms such as suicide.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Maternal and Child Health Bureau

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 18-Jul-2013
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Weight loss drug helps curb cocaine addictions, Penn study finds
The drug topiramate, typically used to treat epilepsy and more recently weight loss, may also help people addicted to both cocaine and alcohol use less cocaine, particularly heavy users, researchers in the department of psychiatry at Penn Medicine report in a new study published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Jul-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Chemical compound shows promise as alternative to opioid pain relievers
A drug targeting a protein complex containing two different types of opioid receptors may be an effective alternative to morphine and other opioid pain medications, without any of the side effects or risk of dependence, according to research led by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Mount Sinai Press Office
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Jul-2013
First large public health study of medical marijuana use in young adults to begin with NIH grant
Drexel University has received a grant for a five-year study of medical marijuana and its impact on drug use and physical and psychological health among young adults in Los Angeles. It is the first large-scale NIH project funded to directly investigate medical marijuana use among young adults aged 18 to 26. A core focus is understanding the significance and influence of dispensaries -- storefronts that sell medical marijuana -- on health.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 9-Jul-2013
Health Education Research
School policies reduce student drinking -- if they're perceived to be enforced
School anti-alcohol policies do work, but only if students believe they will be enforced.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, and others

Contact: Richard Catalano
catalano@uw.edu
206-543-6382
University of Washington

Public Release: 1-Jul-2013
A nanotech fix for nicotine dependence
Yung Chang and her colleagues at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute have launched an ambitious new project, designed to attack nicotine dependence in a radically new way. The research effort, pursued under a new $3.3 million grant from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, will attempt to design a vaccine conferring immunity to nicotine, using nanoscale structures assembled from DNA.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Joseph Caspermeyer
Joseph.Caspermeyer@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 1-Jul-2013
Child Abuse and Neglect
CWRU researchers trace inner-city women's health issues to childhood traumas
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have traced chronic health problems of adult inner-city women to traumas from childhood abuse and neglect.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 27-Jun-2013
JAMA Psychiatry
Ritalin shows promise in treating addiction
A single dose of a commonly prescribed attention deficit hyperactivity disorder drug helps improve brain function in cocaine addiction.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Mount Sinai Press Office
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Jun-2013
Pediatrics
Pediatric practices can offer smoking cessation assistance to parents of their patients
A study in the journal Pediatrics shows that it is feasible for pediatric practices to incorporate into their normal routine efforts to inform patients' parents about services available to help them quit smoking.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality

Contact: Kory Dodd Zhao
kzhao2@partners.org
617-726-0274
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 21-Jun-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Study shows a solitary mutation can destroy critical 'window' of early brain development
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have shown in animal models that brain damage caused by the loss of a single copy of a gene during very early childhood development can cause a lifetime of behavioral and intellectual problems.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 13-Jun-2013
American Journal of Public Health
Tobacco laws for youth may reduce adult smoking
States that want to reduce rates of adult smoking may consider implementing stringent tobacco restrictions on teens. Washington University researchers discovered that states with more restrictive limits on teens purchasing tobacco also have lower adult smoking rates, especially among women.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 12-Jun-2013
Biological Psychiatry
Scripps Research Institute team points to brain's 'dark side' as key to cocaine addiction
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found evidence that an emotion-related brain region called the central amygdala -- whose activity promotes feelings of malaise and unhappiness -- plays a major role in sustaining cocaine addiction.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Pearson Center for Alcoholism & Addiction Research

Contact: Mika Ono
mikaono@scripps.edu
858-784-2052
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 11-Jun-2013
Nicotine & Tobacco Research
IU studies find workplace and financial stress lead to poor health choices
Two studies from the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington highlight the negative impact workplace and financial stress can have on health behaviors. "There's growing evidence that work-family conflict is related to a range of negative health behaviors, and it's something for workplace wellness programs to take into consideration when they're trying to get employees to engage in healthier behaviors, whether it's physical activity, nutrition or quitting smoking," lead author Jon Macy said.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jon Macy
jtmacy@indiana.edu
812-856-0704
Indiana University

Public Release: 10-Jun-2013
SLEEP 2013
Sleep
Frequent binge drinking is associated with insomnia symptoms in older adults
A new study suggests that frequent binge drinking is associated with insomnia symptoms in older adults.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Lynn Celmer
lcelmer@aasmnet.org
630-737-9700
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Public Release: 5-Jun-2013
Science Translational Medicine
Fear learning studies point to a potential new treatment for PTSD
An opioid receptor agonist can reduce PTSD-like symptoms in an animal model. Additional data from humans strengthen the case for opioid receptors' involvement in regulating fear learning.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Showing releases 51-75 out of 85.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2014 by AAAS, the science society.