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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 83.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
BU study: 1 question may gauge the severity of unhealthy drug and alcohol use
Primary care physicians seeking to determine whether a patient's drug or alcohol use is problematic often have to rely on lengthy questionnaires containing dozens of items with multiple response options. Primary care physicians seeking to determine whether a patient's drug or alcohol use is problematic often have to rely on lengthy questionnaires containing dozens of items with multiple response options. But a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health researcher suggests that a single screening question may not only identify unhealthy use, but can help to determine the level of alcohol and drug dependence just as well -- and sometimes better -- than longer screening tools.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Lisa Chedekel
chedekel@bu.edu
617-571-6370
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 8-Jan-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Mental disorders in mid-life and older adulthood more prevalent than previously reported
Common methods of assessing mental or physical disorders may consistently underestimate the prevalence of mental disorders among middle-aged and older adults, a new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found. The analysis reveals substantial discrepancies among mid-life and late-life adults in reporting past mental health disorders, including depression, compared with physical disorders such as arthritis and hypertension.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Tim Parsons
tmparson@jhsph.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 1-Jan-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Alcohol, tobacco, drug use far higher in severely mentally ill
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Southern California have found that rates of smoking, drinking and drug use are significantly higher among those who have psychotic disorders than in the general population. And that finding is of particular concern because individuals with severe mental illness are more likely to die at younger ages than people who don't have psychiatric disorders.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Dec-2013
Science
UT Southwestern neuroscience researchers identify gene involved in response to cocaine
UT Southwestern neuroscience researchers have identified a gene that controls the response to cocaine by comparing closely related strains of mice often used to study addiction and behavior patterns.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Deborah Wormser
deborah.wormser@utsouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Dec-2013
Science
Cocaine, meth response differ between 2 substrains of 'Black 6' laboratory mouse
Researchers including Jackson Laboratory Professor Gary Churchill, Ph.D., have found a single nucleotide polymorphism difference in cocaine and methamphetamine response between two substrains of the C57BL/6 or "Black 6" inbred laboratory mouse, pointing to Cyfip2 as a regulator of cocaine response with a possible role in addiction.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Joyce Peterson
joyce.peterson@jax.org
207-288-6058
Jackson Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Dec-2013
Journal of Children's Services
5 effective parenting programs to reduce problem behaviors in children
University of Washington researchers evaluated about 20 parenting programs and found five that are especially effective at helping parents and children at all risk levels avoid adolescent behavior problems that affect not only individuals, but entire communities.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Molly McElroy
mollywmc@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 16-Dec-2013
Schizophrenia Bulletin
Heavy marijuana users have abnormal brain structure and poor memory
Teens who were heavy marijuana users had abnormal changes in their brains related to memory and performed poorly on memory tasks, reports a new study. The brain abnormalities and memory problems were observed in the subjects' early twenties, two years after they stopped smoking marijuana, possibly indicating long-term effects. Memory-related structures in their brains appeared to shrink. The younger drug abuse starts, the more abnormal the brain appeared. The marijuana-related brain abnormalities look similar to schizophrenia-related brain abnormalities.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2013
JAMA
Screening new inmates for HIV may not reveal many new undetected cases, study shows
More than 22,000 inmates entering North Carolina prisons in 2008 and 2009 were tested for HIV, but only 20 previously undiagnosed cases of HIV were found in this population.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Lisa Chensvold
lisa_chensvold@med.unc.edu
919-843-5719
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 21-Nov-2013
AIDS Patient Care and STDs
High HIV knowledge and risky sexual behavior not associated with HIV testing in young adolescents
New research from Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine has found that teens most likely to be tested for HIV had strong partner communication about HIV and were in committed relationships. Having high knowledge about HIV and engaging in risky sexual activity did not increase testing. The study of nearly 1,000 Bronx, NY teens was published in the November issue of AIDS Patient Care and STDs.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Deirdre Branley
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Recessionary woes lead to adverse alcohol outcomes for men and middle-aged Americans
Economic downturns can have adverse health-related consequences, including poorer mental health and higher rates of suicide. New research looks at different types of economic loss and associated alcohol consumption/ problems. The most adverse effects of severe economic loss on drunkenness and alcohol problems were concentrated among men and the middle-aged.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Nina Mulia, Ph.D.
nmulia@arg.org
510-597-3440
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Psychiatric Services
Most teen mental health problems go untreated
More than half of adolescents with psychiatric disorders receive no treatment of any sort, says a new study by E. Jane Costello, a Duke University professor of psychology and epidemiology and associate director of the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy. When treatment does occur, the providers are rarely mental health specialists.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Alison Jones
alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 9-Nov-2013
Psychological Science
You want fries with that? Don't go there
A new Dartmouth neuroimaging study suggests chronic dieters overeat when the regions of their brain that balance impulsive behavior and self-control become disrupted, decreasing their capacity to resist temptation.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 8-Nov-2013
Neuroscience 2013
Brain, Behavior and Immunity
In animal study, 'cold turkey' withdrawal from drugs triggers mental decline
Can quitting drugs without treatment trigger a decline in mental health? That appears to be the case in an animal model of morphine addiction. Georgetown University Medical Center researchers say their observations suggest that managing morphine withdrawal could promote a healthier mental state in people. The study will be presented at Neuroscience 2013, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Karen Mallet
km463@georgetown.edu
Georgetown University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
Psychopharmacology
Addicts may be seeking relief from emotional lows more than euphoric highs
Rutgers researchers are challenging the commonly held view that drug addiction occurs because users are always going after the high. Based on new animal studies, they say the initial positive feelings of intoxication are short lived -- quickly replaced by negative emotional responses which may be more important in understanding substance abuse.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Robin Lally
732-932-7084 x652
Rutgers University

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
ISR Research Center for Group Dynamics Seminar Series on Violence and Aggression
Bad boys: Research predicts whether boys will grow out of it -- or not
Using the hi-tech tools of a new field called neurogenetics and a few simple questions for parents, a University of Michigan researcher is beginning to understand which boys are simply being boys and which may be headed for trouble.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Diane Swanbrow
swanbrow@umich.edu
734-647-9069
University of Michigan

Public Release: 1-Nov-2013
Pediatrics
Home visits lessen emergency care for infants
Home visits from a nurse are a proven but expensive way to help newborns get a good start in life. New research from Duke University suggests that less costly home visiting programs can reach more families and still produce significant health care improvements. Infants in the study had 50 percent fewer emergency care episodes than other babies in the first year of life.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, The Duke Endowment, Pew Center on the States

Contact: Alison Jones
Alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 31-Oct-2013
Frontiers in Psychology
NYU study on incarcerated youth shows potential to lower anti-social behavior and recidivism
It is the first study to show that mindfulness training can be used in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy to protect attentional functioning in high-risk incarcerated youth.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
Journal of Attention Disorders
What a difference a grade makes
Children with attention problems that emerge in first grade show poorer school performance for years afterward, including scoring lower on fifth grade reading. The poor performance occurred even if the attention problems were fleeting and improved after first grade. By contrast, children who developed attention problems starting in second grade performed as well as their peers in later years.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, US Department of Education

Contact: Alison Jones
alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
JAMA
Risk-reduction counseling at time of HIV testing does not result in reduction of STIs
Brief risk-reduction counseling at the time of a rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test was not effective for reducing new sexually transmitted infections during the subsequent six months among persons at risk for HIV.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
UCLA gets $7 million to study substance use and HIV among minority men who have sex with men
The National Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded UCLA a $7 million grant to investigate the links between substance abuse and HIV among Latino and African-American men who have sex with men. Researchers will examine how non-injected drugs and alcohol can directly interact with the virus and other infectious diseases, to damage these men's health.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 17-Oct-2013
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Use of false ID by youth to buy alcohol is a slippery slope toward alcohol use disorders
Many underage youth use false identification to buy alcohol. A new study has found that almost two-thirds of a college student sample used false IDs. False ID use might contribute to the development of alcohol use disorders by facilitating more frequent drinking.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Amelia M. Arria, Ph.D.
aarria@umd.edu
301-405-9795
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Scientists unravel mechanisms in chronic itching
New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that chronic itching, which can occur in many medical conditions, is different from the urge to scratch a mosquito bite. Chronic itching appears to incorporate more than just the nerve cells that normally transmit itch signals. In chronic itching, neurons that send itch signals also co-opt pain neurons to intensify the itch sensation.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH/National Eye Institute, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
Journal of Leukocyte Biology
Cocaine use can make otherwise resistant immune cells susceptible to HIV
Cocaine makes otherwise resistant immune cells susceptible to infection with HIV, causing both significant infection and new production of the virus.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
NIH awards CCNY $1.5 million to train addiction researchers
Aiming to increase the number of scientists from underrepresented minority groups conducting addiction research, the National Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded $1.5 million to support a new training program at the City College of New York.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Ellis Simon
esimon@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-6460
City College of New York

Public Release: 4-Sep-2013
American Journal of Community Psychology
Children benefit from positive peer influence in afterschool programs
Children in afterschool programs who have a sense of connectedness with their peers are less likely to report emotional problems, according to Penn State researchers. Children exhibited fewer behavior problems if they perceived their peers were willing to encourage them to behave well.
William T. Grant Foundation, Wallace Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Victoria M. Indivero
vmi1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Showing releases 51-75 out of 83.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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