NIH Director Page NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIH Social Media and Outreach
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Videos
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-85 out of 85.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
Psychopharmacology
Addicts may be seeking relief from emotional lows more than euphoric highs
Rutgers researchers are challenging the commonly held view that drug addiction occurs because users are always going after the high. Based on new animal studies, they say the initial positive feelings of intoxication are short lived -- quickly replaced by negative emotional responses which may be more important in understanding substance abuse.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Robin Lally
732-932-7084 x652
Rutgers University

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
ISR Research Center for Group Dynamics Seminar Series on Violence and Aggression
Bad boys: Research predicts whether boys will grow out of it -- or not
Using the hi-tech tools of a new field called neurogenetics and a few simple questions for parents, a University of Michigan researcher is beginning to understand which boys are simply being boys and which may be headed for trouble.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Diane Swanbrow
swanbrow@umich.edu
734-647-9069
University of Michigan

Public Release: 1-Nov-2013
Pediatrics
Home visits lessen emergency care for infants
Home visits from a nurse are a proven but expensive way to help newborns get a good start in life. New research from Duke University suggests that less costly home visiting programs can reach more families and still produce significant health care improvements. Infants in the study had 50 percent fewer emergency care episodes than other babies in the first year of life.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, The Duke Endowment, Pew Center on the States

Contact: Alison Jones
Alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 31-Oct-2013
Frontiers in Psychology
NYU study on incarcerated youth shows potential to lower anti-social behavior and recidivism
It is the first study to show that mindfulness training can be used in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy to protect attentional functioning in high-risk incarcerated youth.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
Journal of Attention Disorders
What a difference a grade makes
Children with attention problems that emerge in first grade show poorer school performance for years afterward, including scoring lower on fifth grade reading. The poor performance occurred even if the attention problems were fleeting and improved after first grade. By contrast, children who developed attention problems starting in second grade performed as well as their peers in later years.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, US Department of Education

Contact: Alison Jones
alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
JAMA
Risk-reduction counseling at time of HIV testing does not result in reduction of STIs
Brief risk-reduction counseling at the time of a rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test was not effective for reducing new sexually transmitted infections during the subsequent six months among persons at risk for HIV.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 21-Oct-2013
UCLA gets $7 million to study substance use and HIV among minority men who have sex with men
The National Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded UCLA a $7 million grant to investigate the links between substance abuse and HIV among Latino and African-American men who have sex with men. Researchers will examine how non-injected drugs and alcohol can directly interact with the virus and other infectious diseases, to damage these men's health.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 17-Oct-2013
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Use of false ID by youth to buy alcohol is a slippery slope toward alcohol use disorders
Many underage youth use false identification to buy alcohol. A new study has found that almost two-thirds of a college student sample used false IDs. False ID use might contribute to the development of alcohol use disorders by facilitating more frequent drinking.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Amelia M. Arria, Ph.D.
aarria@umd.edu
301-405-9795
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research

Public Release: 15-Oct-2013
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Scientists unravel mechanisms in chronic itching
New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that chronic itching, which can occur in many medical conditions, is different from the urge to scratch a mosquito bite. Chronic itching appears to incorporate more than just the nerve cells that normally transmit itch signals. In chronic itching, neurons that send itch signals also co-opt pain neurons to intensify the itch sensation.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH/National Eye Institute, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
Journal of Leukocyte Biology
Cocaine use can make otherwise resistant immune cells susceptible to HIV
Cocaine makes otherwise resistant immune cells susceptible to infection with HIV, causing both significant infection and new production of the virus.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Showing releases 76-85 out of 85.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2014 by AAAS, the science society.