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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-95 out of 95.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity
One in 10 male, same-sex Craigslist ads seek men who don't identify as gay
Online sexual hook-ups present a unique opportunity to explore many factors of decision-making that inform sexual health. A latest study conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the National Development and Research Institutes found evidence that men having sex with men use the Internet to find sexual partners who do not identify as gay, either to fulfill a fantasy or because it allows anonymous sexual encounters without discovery.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
For neurons in the brain, identity can be used to predict location
There are many types of neurons of neurons, defined largely by the patterns of genes they use, and they 'live' in distinct brain regions. But researchers do not yet have a comprehensive understanding of these neuronal types and how they are distributed in the brain. A team of scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory describes a new mathematical model that combines large data sets to predict where different types of cells are located within the brain.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jaclyn Jansen
jjansen@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Mar-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Negative effects of joining a gang last long after gang membership ends
Joining a gang in adolescence has significant consequences in adulthood beyond criminal behavior, even after a person leaves the gang. Former gang members are more likely to be in poor health, receiving government assistance and struggling with drug abuse than someone who never joined a gang.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Mental Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundatio

Contact: Amanda Gilman
abg5@uw.edu
University of Washington

Public Release: 12-Mar-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Nicotine withdrawal weakens brain connections tied to self-control over cigarette cravings
A new brain imaging study in this week's JAMA Psychiatry from scientists in Penn Medicine and the National Institute on Drug Abuse Intramural Research Program shows how smokers suffering from nicotine withdrawal may have more trouble shifting from a key brain network -- known as default mode, when people are in a so-called 'introspective' state -- and into a control network that could help exert more self-control over cravings and to focus on quitting for good.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Mar-2014
Public Health Reports
Prescriptions for opioids stabilizing after fivefold increase in 10-year span
To support the appropriate use of opioids and inform public health interventions to prevent drug abuse, most states have implemented a prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP). Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health evaluated the impact of these state-wide programs and found that after tripling until 2007, annual rates of prescriptions for opioid analgesics have stabilized although the effects of PDMPs on opioid dispensing vary markedly by state.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 21-Feb-2014
Annals of Epidemiology
Reducing HIV transmission among drug injectors lowers AIDS mortality in heterosexuals
A recent study conducted by researchers from New York University's Center for Drug Use and HIV Research, led by Samuel R. Friedman, Director of both New York University's Center for Drug Use and HIV Research's interdisciplinary theoretical synthesis core, and the Institute for Infectious Disease Research at National Development and Research Institutes, sheds light on the pathways connecting HIV epidemics in different populations.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Public Health Solutions, National Development and Research Institutes

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 21-Feb-2014
AIDS Education and Prevention
Researchers look to reduce hep C infections for injecting drug user
Researchers affiliated with New York University's Center for Drug Use and HIV Research are focusing on intervention strategies that highlight the lesser-known dangers of HCV transmission through the sharing of other injection equipment such as cookers, filters, drug-dilution water and water containers.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
Preventive Medicine
In fight against teen prescription drug abuse, one-two punch wins
Programs that aim to curb teen prescription drug abuse have vastly differing success rates, ranging from big drops in drug abuse to no measurable effect, says a new study from researchers at Duke and Pennsylvania State universities. The best results came from pairing a school-based program with a home-based intervention, resulting in a 10 percent decrease in abuse rates. Most school-based programs were ineffective when used by themselves.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Alison Jones
Alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Journal of Adolescent Health
Data on today's youth reveal childhood clues for later risk of STDs
Here's yet another reason to focus on kids' early years. Children who grow up in well-managed households, enjoy school, and have friends who stay out of trouble report fewer sexually transmitted diseases in young adulthood, according to a new analysis.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Contact: Molly McElroy
mollywmc@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Psychological Science
After committing a crime, guilt and shame predict re-offense
Within three years of being released from jail, two out of every three inmates in the US wind up behind bars again -- a problem that contributes to the highest incarceration rate of any country in the world. New research suggests that the degree to which inmates' express guilt or shame may provide an indicator of how likely they are to re-offend.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Psychological Medicine
Smoking cessation may improve mental health
Although many health professionals who treat people with psychiatric problems overlook their patients' smoking habits, new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that people who struggle with mood problems or addiction can safely quit smoking and that kicking the habit is associated with improved mental health.
NIH/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, American Cancer Society

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Most teen workers spend, not save
High school seniors spend most of their earnings on clothes, music, movies, eating out and other personal expenses. Spending on cars and car expenses comes in second, especially for males. And way down the list come saving for college or other long-range goals and helping with family living expenses.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Diane Swanbrow
swanbrow@umich.edu
734-647-9069
University of Michigan

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Mind over matter: Beating pain and painkillers
Misuse of prescription opioids can lead to serious side effects -- including death by overdose. A new treatment developed by University of Utah researcher Eric Garland has shown to not only lower pain but also decrease prescription opioid misuse among chronic pain patients.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Eric Garland
eric.garland@socwk.utah.edu
801-581-3826
University of Utah

Public Release: 3-Feb-2014
Child Development
For young African-Americans, emotional support buffers the biological toll of racial discrimination
A new study has found that African-American youth who report experiencing frequent discrimination during adolescence are at risk for developing chronic diseases like heart disease in later years. The study, which looked at 331 rural youth living in Georgia, found that emotional support from parents and peers can protect from the effects of allostatic load -- biological wear and tear due to exposure to repeated stress.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
Journal of Abnormal Psychology
Study finds troubling relationship between drinking and PTSD symptoms in college students
The estimated 9 percent of college students who have symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are likely to drink more alcohol than peers without the psychological condition. In turn, heavy alcohol consumption exacerbates their PTSD symptoms over time, prolonging a vicious cycle. These are the conclusions of the first empirical study to examine the bidirectional influences of the two phenomena, influences that had been theorized but never tested.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Patricia Donovan
pdonovan@buffalo.edu
716-645-4602
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
AIDS
BUSM study associates pro-inflammatory molecules with early death in HIV patients
A study led by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine provides new insight into the impact that pro-inflammatory molecules have on early death in HIV patients who abuse alcohol. The findings, published in the journal AIDS, pinpoint the inflammatory markers most associated with early death and may help explain why some patients die earlier than others even when all of these patients are on antiretroviral therapy.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Jenny Eriksen Leary
jenny.eriksen@bmc.org
617-638-6841
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Jan-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Medicaid expansion improves health care services for prison population
National study finds that prison systems are increasingly aiding prisoners' enrollment in Medicaid, both during incarceration and in preparation of release.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Gail Leach Carvelli
gcarvelli@lifespan.org
401-444-7299
Lifespan

Public Release: 13-Jan-2014
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
BU study: 1 question may gauge the severity of unhealthy drug and alcohol use
Primary care physicians seeking to determine whether a patient's drug or alcohol use is problematic often have to rely on lengthy questionnaires containing dozens of items with multiple response options. Primary care physicians seeking to determine whether a patient's drug or alcohol use is problematic often have to rely on lengthy questionnaires containing dozens of items with multiple response options. But a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health researcher suggests that a single screening question may not only identify unhealthy use, but can help to determine the level of alcohol and drug dependence just as well -- and sometimes better -- than longer screening tools.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Lisa Chedekel
chedekel@bu.edu
617-571-6370
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 8-Jan-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Mental disorders in mid-life and older adulthood more prevalent than previously reported
Common methods of assessing mental or physical disorders may consistently underestimate the prevalence of mental disorders among middle-aged and older adults, a new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found. The analysis reveals substantial discrepancies among mid-life and late-life adults in reporting past mental health disorders, including depression, compared with physical disorders such as arthritis and hypertension.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Tim Parsons
tmparson@jhsph.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 1-Jan-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Alcohol, tobacco, drug use far higher in severely mentally ill
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Southern California have found that rates of smoking, drinking and drug use are significantly higher among those who have psychotic disorders than in the general population. And that finding is of particular concern because individuals with severe mental illness are more likely to die at younger ages than people who don't have psychiatric disorders.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Showing releases 76-95 out of 95.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

     
   

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