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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 158.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Teens whose parents exert more psychological control have trouble with closeness, independence
A new longitudinal study has found that teens whose parents exerted psychological control over them at age 13 had problems establishing healthy friendships and romantic relationships both in adolescence and into adulthood. The study followed 184 ethnically and socioeconomically diverse teens from age 13 to 21. It found that giving in to 'peer pressure' was more common among teens whose parents used guilt, withdrawing love, fostering anxiety, or other psychologically manipulative tactics.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level
A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Marie Curie Outgoing Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy
A new study conducted by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Tom Hughes
Tom.Hughes@unchealth.unc.edu
984-974-1151
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests
A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before may boost later learning.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Defense

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Stress-related inflammation may increase risk for depression
Preexisting differences in the sensitivity of a key part of each individual's immune system to stress confer a greater risk of developing stress-related depression or anxiety
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Johnson and Johnson International Mental Health Research Organization, Irma T. Hirschl/Monique Weill-Caulier Trust, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Brain and Behavior Research Organization

Contact: Elizabeth Dowling
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Clinical Psychological Science
Teenage girls are exposed to more stressors that increase depression risk
Adolescence is often a turbulent time, and it is marked by substantially increased rates of depressive symptoms, especially among girls. New research indicates that this gender difference may be the result of girls' greater exposure to stressful interpersonal events, making them more likely to ruminate, and contributing to their risk of depression. The findings are published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Working memory hinders learning in schizophrenia
Trouble with working memory makes a distinct contribution to the difficulty people with schizophrenia sometimes have in learning, according to a new study. The researchers employed a specially designed experiment and computational models to distinguish the roles of working memory and reinforcement learning.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Effective treatments available for HIV patients not eligible for efavirenz regimens
A new national clinical trial found HIV drug regimens that do not include efavirenz are effective as first-line antiretroviral therapy. The finding is important for patients who are not eligible for treatment with efavirenz, including women considering becoming pregnant and patients with a history of severe psychiatric disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, AIDS Clinical Trials Group, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Holly Korschun
hkorsch@emory.edu
404-727-3990
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Sense of invalidation uniquely risky for troubled teens
A study of 99 teens hospitalized out of concern about suicide risk found that a high perception of family invalidation -- or lack of acceptance -- predicted future suicide events among boys, and peer invalidation predicted future self harm, such as cutting, among the teens in general.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Psychiatric Services
Public feels more negative toward drug addicts than mentally ill
People are significantly more likely to have negative attitudes toward those suffering from drug addiction than those with mental illness, and don't support insurance, housing and employment policies that benefit those dependent on drugs, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.
American International Group, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, Indiana University

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
U-M, USC, Broad to study genetics of 2 mental health disorders
Researchers at the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Medical School and collaborators at two other institutions will undertake the largest whole genome sequencing study funded to date, as they seek to better understand bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Laurel Thomas Gnagey
ltgnagey@umich.edu
734-647-1841
University of Michigan

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Basic and Applied Social Psychology
How career dreams are born
A new study shows just what it takes to convince a person that she is qualified to achieve the career of her dreams.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Patrick Carroll
Carroll.279@osu.edu
419-995-8235
Ohio State University

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
National team awarded $16 million NIH grant to study genetics of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder
A multi-institutional team of researchers studying schizophrenia and bipolar disorder has been awarded a $16 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to create the most extensive genetic resource to date for these two devastating psychiatric disorders, using data assembled by the University of Southern California.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Alison Trinidad
alison.trinidad@usc.edu
323-442-3941
University of Southern California - Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Cell
Researchers engineer 'Cas9' animal models to study disease and inform drug discovery
Researchers from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a new mouse model to simplify application of the CRISPR-Cas9 system for in vivo genome editing experiments. The researchers successfully used the new 'Cas9 mouse' model to edit multiple genes in a variety of cell types, and to model lung adenocarcinoma, one of the most lethal human cancers. A paper describing this new model and its initial applications appears this week in Cell.
National Science Foundation, The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Institute, MIT/Simons Center for the Social Brain, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Haley Bridger
hbridger@broadinstitute.org
617-714-7968
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 22-Sep-2014
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Brainwave test could improve autism diagnosis and classification
A new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University suggests that measuring how fast the brain responds to sights and sounds could help in objectively classifying people on the autism spectrum and may help diagnose the condition earlier. The paper was published today in the online edition of the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Sep-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Brain imaging research pinpoints neurobiological basis for key symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress disorder like listlessness and emotional detachment in trauma victims
In a novel brain-imaging study among trauma victims, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have linked an opioid receptor in the brain -- associated with emotions -- to a narrow cluster of trauma symptoms, including sadness, emotional detachment and listlessness. The study, published online today in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, holds important implications for targeted, personalized treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, a psychiatric condition affecting more than 8 million Americans that can cause a wide range of debilitating psychiatric symptoms.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Science, US Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Lorinda Klein
lorindaann.klein@nyumc.org
212-404-3533
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
Schizophrenia not a single disease but multiple genetically distinct disorders
New research shows that schizophrenia isn't a single disease but a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each with its own set of symptoms. The finding could be a first step toward improved diagnosis and treatment for the debilitating psychiatric illness. The research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is reported online Sept. 15 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Spanish Ministry of Science and Technology, R.L. Kirchstein National Research Award, and others

Contact: Elizabethe Holland Durando
elizabethe.durando@wustl.edu
314-286-0119
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
To curb violent tendencies, start young
Aggressive children are less likely to become violent criminals or psychiatrically troubled adults if they receive intensive early intervention, say a new study based on more than two decades of research. The study from researchers at Duke and three other universities provides some of the strongest evidence yet that violent tendencies can be curbed.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, US Department of Education, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Alison Jones
Alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Autism early detection program expands
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is now estimated to impact one in every 68 children born in the United States. A new 5-year, $5.1 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health seeks expand a program developed by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine to reduce the mean age of ASD diagnosis in multiple cities across the US.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Intervention in 6-month-olds with autism eliminates symptoms, developmental delay
Treatment at the earliest age when autism spectrum disorder is detectable -- in infants as young as 6 months old -- significantly reduces symptoms so that by age 3 most who received the therapy had neither autism nor delay, a UC Davis MIND Institute research study has found.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Psychological Science
Faces are more likely to seem alive when we want to feel connected
Feeling socially disconnected may lead us to lower our threshold for determining that another being is animate or alive, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Brain networks 'hyper-connected' in young adults who had depression
Functional magnetic resonance imaging may help to better predict and understand depression in young adults.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, UIC Center for Clinical and Translational Science

Contact: Sherri McGinnis Gonzalez
smcginn@uic.edu
312-996-8277
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
JAMA
Collaborative care improves depression in teens
How best to care for the many adolescents who have depression? In a collaborative care intervention, a care manager continually reached out to teens -- delivering and following up on treatment in a primary-care setting. Depression outcomes after a year were significantly better with this approach than with usual care, according to a JAMA report of a randomized controlled trial from Seattle Children's, Group Health, and the University of Washington.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Rose Ibarra (Egge)
rose.ibarra@seattlechildrens.org
206-987-7334
Group Health Research Institute

Public Release: 24-Aug-2014
Nature Neuroscience
'Haven't my neurons seen this before?'
The world grows increasingly more chaotic year after year, and our brains are constantly bombarded with images. A new study from Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, a joint project between Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh, reveals how neurons in the part of the brain responsible for recognizing objects respond to being shown a barrage of images. The study is published online by Nature Neuroscience.
NIH/National Eye Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Pennsylvania Department of Health/Commonwealth Universal Research Enhancement Program

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Maturing brain flips function of amygdala in regulating stress hormones
In contrast to evidence that the amygdala stimulates stress responses in adults, Yerkes researchers have found that the amygdala has an inhibitory effect on stress hormones during the early development of nonhuman primates. Adds to evidence for a developmental switch in amygdala function and connectivity.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Showing releases 1-25 out of 158.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

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