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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 155.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
Health coaching paired with gym membership works best for obese people with mental illness
A health promotion program, called In SHAPE, designed for people with serious mental illness, produced more fit participants and significant weight loss than a control group where participants only received a gym membership. The results of a randomized clinical trial, published in the Dec. 12 American Journal of Psychiatry, Dr. Stephen Bartels of Dartmouth and colleagues showed that more than half the participants in the In SHAPE group achieved clinically significant reduction in cardiovascular risk.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Annmarie Christensen
Annmarie.Christensen@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-0897
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Lancet HIV
Combining social media and behavioral psychology could lead to more HIV testing
UCLA research suggests that social media such as Twitter and Facebook, combined with behavioral psychology, could be a valuable tool in the fight against AIDS by prompting high-risk individuals to be tested.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, UCLA AIDS Institute and Center for AIDS Research

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
International Journal of Eating Disorders
Season's eatings
Some women become preoccupied with their body weight and shape after changes in hormones drive increases in emotional eating, or the tendency to overconsume food in response to negative emotions. The recurring nature of monthly increases in weight concerns in menstruating women may increase the risk of developing an eating disorder.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kim Ward
kim.ward@cabs.msu.edu
517-432-0117
Michigan State University

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Study links ADHD, conduct disorder with alcohol and tobacco use in young teens
A new study links attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder in young adolescents with increased alcohol and tobacco use. The Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center study is among the first to assess such an association in this age group.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Feuer
jim.feuer@cchmc.org
513-636-4656
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
NeuroImage
Brain study from UT Dallas uncovers new clues on how cues may affect memory
New research out of the University of Texas at Dallas shows that the brain activity prior to seeing an item is related to how well it is later remembered. Moreover, the researchers also found that the activity in different areas of the brain was unexpectedly related to how the information was remembered.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Ben Porter
ben.porter@utdallas.edu
972-883-2193
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Brain representations of social thoughts accurately predict autism diagnosis
Carnegie Mellon University researchers have created brain-reading techniques to use neural representations of social thoughts to predict autism diagnoses with 97 percent accuracy. This establishes the first biologically based diagnostic tool that measures a person's thoughts to detect the disorder that affects many children and adults worldwide.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
Two studies identify a detectable, pre-cancerous state in the blood
Researchers from the Broad Institute, Harvard Medical School, and Harvard-affiliated hospitals have uncovered an easily detectable, 'pre-malignant' state in the blood that significantly increases the likelihood that an individual will go on to develop blood cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma, or myelodysplastic syndrome. The discovery, which was made independently by two research teams affiliated with the Broad and partner institutions, opens new avenues for research aimed at early detection and prevention of blood cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Gabrielle's Angel Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Wellcome Trust, and others

Contact: Veronica Meade-Kelly
veronica@broadinstitute.org
617-714-7113
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
Research shows why antidepressant may be effective in postpartum depression
An antidepressant commonly prescribed for women with postpartum depression may restore connections between cells in brain regions that are negatively affected by chronic stress during pregnancy, new research suggests.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Benedetta Leuner
Leuner.1@osu.edu
614-292-5218
Ohio State University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Pain from rejection and physical pain may not be so similar after all
Over the last decade, neuroscientists have largely come to believe that physical pain and social pain are processed by the brain in the same way. But a new study led by the University of Colorado shows that the two kinds of pain actually use distinct neural circuits, a finding that could lead to more targeted treatments and a better understanding of how the two kinds of pain interact.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Choong-Wan Woo
Choongwan.Woo@colorado.edu
720-443-3640
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
High-fructose diet in adolescence may exacerbate depressive-like behavior
When animals consume a diet high in fructose throughout adolescence, it can worsen depressive- and anxiety-like behavior and alter how the brain responds to stress.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Neuropsychopharmacology
Study finds Alzheimer's drug may reduce the urge to binge eat
The Alzheimer's drug memantine may perform double-duty helping binge eaters control their compulsion. Researchers have demonstrated that memantine, a neuroprotective drug, may reduce the addictive and impulsive behavior associated with binge eating.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health Peter Paul Career Development Professorship, McManus Charitable Trust

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Depression, overwhelming guilt in preschool years linked to brain changes
A key brain region involved in emotion is smaller in older children diagnosed with depression as preschoolers, and predicts risk of later recurrence, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Journal of Abnormal Psychology
Hope for those with social anxiety disorder: You may already be someone's best friend
Making friends is often extremely difficult for people with social anxiety disorder and to make matters worse, people with this disorder tend to assume that the friendships they do have are not of the highest quality. The problem with this perception, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis, is that their friends don't necessarily see it that way.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gerry Everding
gerry_everding@wustl.edu
314-935-6375
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Nature
Brain protein influences how the brain manages stress; suggests new model of depression
A discovery of new molecular and behavioural connections may provide a foundation for the development of new treatments to combat some forms of depression.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Hope for Depression Research Foundation

Contact: Elizabeth Dowling
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists unveil new targets, test to develop treatments for memory disorder
In a pair of related studies, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a number of new therapeutic targets for memory disorders and have developed a new screening test to uncover compounds that may one day work against those disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Whitehall Foundation

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Predicting US Army suicides after hospital discharge
A new report from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers suggests that some Army suicides can be predicted with enough accuracy to justify implementing preventive interventions in patients at high risk.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Clinical Infectious Diseases
HIV-infected adults diagnosed with age-related diseases at similar ages as uninfected
New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that HIV-infected adults are at a higher risk for developing heart attacks, kidney failure and cancer. But, contrary to what many had believed, the researchers say these illnesses are occurring at similar ages as adults who are not infected with HIV.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, and more

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Cell Reports
The brain's 'inner GPS' gets dismantled
Imagine being able to recognize your car as your own but never being able to remember where you parked it. Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have induced this all-too-common human experience -- or a close version of it -- permanently in rats and from what is observed perhaps derive clues about why strokes and Alzheimer's disease can destroy a person's sense of direction.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Personal Relationships
Is your relationship moving toward marriage? If it isn't, you probably can't admit it
Dating couples who have moved toward marriage over the course of their relationship remember accurately what was going on at each stage of their deepening commitment. But couples whose commitment to each other has stagnated or regressed are far less accurate in their memories of their relationships, says a new University of Illinois study.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Phyllis Picklesimer
p-pickle@illinois.edu
217-244-2827
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Statins reverse learning disabilities caused by genetic disorder
UCLA neuroscientists discovered that statins, a popular class of cholesterol drugs, reverse the learning deficits caused by a mutation linked to a common genetic cause of learning disabilities. Published in the Nov. 10 advance online edition of Nature Neuroscience, the findings were studied in mice genetically engineered to develop the disease, called Noonan syndrome.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Elaine Schmidt
eschmidt@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2272
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
JAMA Pediatrics
Overall risk of birth defects appears low for women taking antiretrovirals during early pregnancy
Among pregnant women infected with HIV, the use of antiretroviral medications early in pregnancy to treat their HIV or to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV does not appear to increase the risk of birth defects in their infants, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development,NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, and others

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Journal of Vocational Behavior
Future family and career goals evident in teenage years
Career and family, often seen as competing parts of life, can actually complement each other, and when young people's goals for the future encompass family and career, the outcome is more likely to be success in both arenas, according to Penn State researchers.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Environmental influences on autism the focus of new $1.6 million federal grant to U-M
University of Michigan researchers will use a new $1.6 million federal grant to probe potential social and environmental links to autism, collecting location-specific information from tens of thousands of affected individuals and their families nationwide.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Schizophrenia Research
EEG test to help understand and treat schizophrenia
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have validated an EEG test to study and treat schizophrenia. The findings, published in two separate studies, offer a clinical test that could be used to help diagnose persons at risk for developing mental illness later in life, as well as an approach for measuring the efficacies of different treatment options.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, US Department of Veteran Affairs, and Veterans Medical Research Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Autism after high school: Making the transition
The National Institute of Mental Health has awarded a grant to University of Kentucky College of Education Professor Lisa Ruble and a team of co-investigators to find ways to help reduce or eliminate the disconnect from needed services that often occurs when students with autism complete school.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jenny Wells
jenny.wells@uky.edu
859-257-5343
University of Kentucky

Showing releases 1-25 out of 155.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

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