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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 165.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Nature Methods
Neuronal positioning system: A GPS to navigate the brain
Scientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Harvard University have announced a 'Neuronal Positioning System' (NPS) that maps the brain's circuitry similar to how a Global Positioning System (GPS) triangulates our location on the planet. The new brain mapping method will help scientists understand the organizational principles of neuronal circuits and learn how their wiring changes during development and in a variety of pathological conditions.
Humans Frontiers Science Foundation, European Research Council/European Union's Seventh Framework Programme, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 27-Apr-2015
Nature Neuroscience
Neurons constantly rewrite their DNA
Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered that neurons are risk takers: they use minor 'DNA surgeries' to toggle their activity levels all day, every day. Since these activity levels are important in learning, memory and brain disorders, the researchers think their finding will shed light on a range of important questions.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Simons Foundation, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, Maryland Stem Cell Research Foundation, and others

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 23-Apr-2015
Cell Reports
Fragile X syndrome: Building a case for an alternative treatment strategy
New results suggest that a drug strategy targeting PI3 kinase could improve learning and behavioral flexibility in people with fragile X syndrome. The approach represents an alternative to one based on drugs targeting glutamate receptors, which have had difficulty showing benefits in clinical trials.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, FRAXA Research Foundation, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, Autism Speaks

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
JAMA
Parent training can reduce serious behavioral problems in young children with autism
A multi-site study sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health finds young children with autism spectrum disorder and serious behavioral problems respond positively to a 24-week structured parent training. The benefits of parent training endured for up to six months post intervention.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Marcus Foundation, J.B. Whitehead Foundation

Contact: Holly Korschun
hkorsch@emory.edu
404-727-3990
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 21-Apr-2015
JAMA
Parent training significantly reduces disruptive behavior in children with autism
A new study suggests that doctors may want to focus on parents and not just on their patients when it comes to caring for children with autism spectrum disorder. The study, published in the April edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association, found that parents who were trained to intervene at the first sign of behavior problems saw a dramatic improvement in their child's condition - an improvement of 70 percent.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Sherri Kirk
Sherri.Kirk@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Neuropsychologia
Living life in the third person
Imagine living a healthy, normal life without the ability to re-experience in your mind personal events from your past. You have learned details about past episodes from your life and can recite these to family and friends, but you can't mentally travel back in time to imagine yourself in any of them. Cognitive scientists had a rare opportunity to examine three middle-aged adults who essentially live their lives in the 'third person.'
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Kelly Connelly
kconnelly@baycrest.org
416-785-2432
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study shows early environment has a lasting impact on stress response systems
The study finds that children raised in Romanian orphanages had blunted stress response systems, while children placed with foster parents before the age of 2 showed stress responses similar to those of children raised in typical families.
John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Binder Family Foundation, Help the Children of Romania Inc. Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Deborah Bach
bach2@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 17-Apr-2015
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Study shows 2 drugs reduce teacher-rated anxiety, in addition to ADHD, aggression
A study led by researchers at the Nisonger Center at Ohio State's Wexner Medical Center is available online today in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology and shows the addition of risperidone to parent training and a stimulant also improves teachers' assessments of anxiety and social avoidance. Improvement in teacher-rated anxiety and social withdrawal also contributed to improvements in parent-rated disruptive behavior. Children who showed reduced anxiety also showed less disruptive behavior.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Sherri Kirk
Sherri.Kirk@osumc.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Study: Amygdala encodes 'cooties' and 'crushes' in the developing brain
Scientists have found a signal in the brain that reflects young children's aversion to members of the opposite sex (the 'cooties' effect) and also their growing interest in opposite-sex peers as they enter puberty. These two responses to members of the opposite sex are encoded in the amygdala, the researchers report. The findings challenge traditional notions about the role of the amygdala, the researchers say.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Cell Reports
Gene loss creates eating disorder-related behaviors in mice
Building on their discovery of a gene linked to eating disorders in humans, a team of researchers at the University of Iowa has now shown that loss of the gene in mice leads to several behavioral abnormalities that resemble behaviors seen in people with anorexia nervosa.
Brain and Behavior Foundation, Klarman Family Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jennifer Brown
jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu
319-356-7124
University of Iowa Health Care

Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Neuron
Brain imaging explains reason for good and poor language outcomes in ASD toddlers
Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers say it may be possible to predict future language development outcomes in toddlers with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), even before they've been formally diagnosed with the condition.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Foundation for Autism Research, Jesus College Cambridge, British Academy

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Depressed? Apps lift mood with personalized therapy
Feeling blue or anxious? Now, there's a mobile 'therapist' designed to understand you and suggest the ideal mini-app to lift your mood. Intellicare, an NIH-funded study, is a new suite of 12 interactive mini-apps to combat depression and anxiety. The free app will suggest a simple mobile app based on your past preferences and feedback from the larger crowd of users. Mobile mental health treatment has potential to help millions who don't get adequate care.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Behavioral Sciences and the Law
Nearly 1 in 10 adults have impulsive anger issues and access to guns
An estimated 9 percent of adults in the US have a history of impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns, according to a study published this month in Behavioral Sciences and the Law. The study also found that an estimated 1.5 percent of adults report impulsive anger and carry firearms outside their homes.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, John W. Alden Trust, Elizabeth K. Dollard Trust

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 2-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Deconstructing brain systems involved in memory and spatial skills
In work that reconciles two competing views of brain structures involved in memory and spatial perception, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have conducted experiments that suggest the hippocampus -- a small region in the brain's limbic system -- is dedicated largely to memory formation and not to spatial skills, such as navigation. The study is published in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
US Department of Veterans Affairs, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Christina Johnson
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-Apr-2015
Scientists win $3.3 million grant to speed development of treatments for autism, epilepsy
Scientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute have been awarded $3.3 million by the National Institutes of Health to identify biomarkers to accelerate drug development for disorders including autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy and some types of intellectual disability.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Depression and Anxiety
Impact of domestic violence on women's mental health
In addition to their physical injuries, women who are victims of domestic violence are also at a greater risk of mental health problems such as depression and psychotic symptoms.
United Kingdom Medical Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, NIh/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Intergenerational transmission of abuse and neglect more complicated than previously believed
A study led by Cathy Spatz Widom, Distinguished Professor of Psychology at John Jay College, found that offspring of parents with histories of child abuse and neglect are themselves at risk for childhood neglect and sexual abuse but not physical abuse. Titled 'Intergenerational Transmission of Child Abuse and Neglect: Real or Detection Bias?' the study's findings were reported in the March 27 issue of the journal Science.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institute of Justice, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Doreen Vinas-Pineda
dvinas@jjay.cuny.edu
212-237-8645
John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
AIDS
For most children with HIV and low immune cell count, cells rebound after treatment
Most children with HIV who have low levels of a key immune cell eventually recover levels of this cell after they begin treatment.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/Office of AIDS Research, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Nature
Pitt team identifies mutations associated with development of congenital heart disease
Fetal ultrasound exams on more than 87,000 mice that were exposed to chemicals that can induce random gene mutations enabled developmental biologists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine to identify mutations associated with congenital heart disease in 61 genes, many not previously known to cause the disease. The study, published online today in Nature, indicates that the antenna-like cellular structures called cilia play a critical role in the development of these heart defects.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
JAMA Psychiatry
Prenatal exposure to common air pollutants linked to cognitive and behavioral impairment
Researchers have found a powerful relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and disturbances in parts of the brain that support information processing and behavioral control.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, US Environmental Protection Agency, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Debra Kain
dkain@chla.usc.edu
323-361-7628
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Nature
New autism-causing genetic variant identified
Using a novel approach that homes in on rare families severely affected by autism, a Johns Hopkins-led team of researchers has identified a new genetic cause of the disease. The rare genetic variant offers important insights into the root causes of autism, the researchers say. And, they suggest, their unconventional method can be used to identify other genetic causes of autism and other complex genetic conditions.
Simons Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Autism Speaks Dennis Weatherstone Predoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
American Journal of Public Health
Fewer multiple births could reduce autism risk in ART children
Scientists report that the incidence of diagnosed autism was twice as high for assisted reproductive technology (ART) as non-ART births among the nearly 6 million children in their study, born in California from 1997 through 2007. However, much of the association between ART and autism was explained by age and education of the mother as well as adverse perinatal outcomes, especially multiple births.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Eric Sharfstein
es3106@columbia.edu
212-854-6164
Columbia University

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
JAMA Psychiatry
Are antipsychotic drugs more dangerous to dementia patients than we think?
Drugs aimed at quelling the behavior problems of dementia patients may also hasten their deaths more than previously realized, a new study finds. The research adds more troubling evidence to the case against antipsychotic drugs as a treatment for the delusions, hallucinations, agitation and aggression that many people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias experience.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
BMC Psychiatry
Risk patterns identified that make people more vulnerable to PTSD
Researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center have built a new computational tool that identifies 800 different ways people are at increased risk for post-traumatic stress disorder, permitting for the first time a personalized prediction guide.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Mandler
jim.mandler@nyumc.org
212-404-3525
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Women's Health Issues
Could yoga lessen prenatal depression?
A community-based prenatal yoga program may be an acceptable, safe, and effective intervention to reduce the symptoms of depression among pregnant women, according to initial results from a small pilot study. The results suggest that further research is warranted, the authors said.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 165.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

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