NIH Director Page NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIH Social Media and Outreach
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Videos
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 162.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 3-Aug-2015
Pediatrics
Even moderate picky eating can have negative effects on children's health
Picky eating among children is a common but burdensome problem that can result in poor nutrition for kids, family conflict, and frustrated parents. Although many families see picky eating as a phase, a new study from Duke Medicine finds moderate and severe picky eating often coincides with serious childhood issues such as depression and anxiety that may need intervention.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Scripps Florida scientists win $1.4 million to study drug candidates for neurological disorders
Scientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute have been awarded $1.4 million from the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health to explore the development of drug candidates for a wide range of conditions, including circadian rhythm disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 23-Jul-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
BIDMC research shows endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm is safe
A new study from researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center compared open surgical repair with a catheter-based procedure and found that the less invasive endovascular aortic repair has clear benefits for most patients.
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Harvard-Longwood Research Training in Vascular Surgery, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kelly Lawman
klawman@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7305
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
8th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention
HPTN 067 demonstrates high-risk populations adhere well to daily PrEP regimen
Results from HPTN 067, a Phase II, randomized, open-label study, demonstrate most study participants had higher coverage of sex events and better adherence when they were assigned to the daily dosing arm, investigators from the HIV Prevention Trials Network reported today at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention in Vancouver, Canada. HPTN 067, also known as the ADAPT Study, was designed to evaluate the feasibility of non-daily pre-exposure prophylaxis regimens.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health and NIH/Office of AIDS Research

Contact: Eric Miller
EMiller@fhi360.org
919-384-6465
FHI360

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Cell
Making 'miniature brains' from skin cells to better understand autism
A larger head size -- or macrocephaly -- is seen in many children with severe autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A new stem cell study of these children by Yale School of Medicine researchers could help predict ASD and may lead to new drug targets for autism treatment. The findings are published in the July 16 issue of the journal Cell.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, State of Connecticut, Simons Foundation

Contact: Karen N. Peart
karen.peart@yale.edu
203-432-1326
Yale University

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Cell
Device delivers drugs to brain via remote control
Tiny, implantable devices are capable of delivering light or drugs to specific areas of the brain, potentially improving drug delivery to targeted regions of the brain and reducing side effects. Eventually, the devices may be used to treat pain, depression, epilepsy and other neurological disorders in people.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Common Fund of the National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Brain network that controls, redirects attention identified
Researchers at Columbia have found that key parts of the human brain network that give us the power to control and redirect our attention -- a core cognitive ability -- may be unique to humans.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Anne Holden, PhD
adh2165@columbia.edu
212-853-0171
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
Science
Scientists 'watch' rats string memories together
By using electrode implants to track nerve cells firing in the brains of rats as they plan where to go next, Johns Hopkins scientists say they have learned that the mammalian brain likely reconstructs memories in a way more like jumping across stepping stones than walking across a bridge. Their experiments shed light on what memories are and how they form, and gives clues about how the system can fail.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 15-Jul-2015
JAMA Psychiatry
Study links success in adulthood to childhood psychiatric health
Children with even mild or passing bouts of depression, anxiety and/or behavioral issues were more inclined to have serious problems that complicated their ability to lead successful lives as adults, according to research from Duke Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, William T. Grant Foundation

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015
Two NIH grants support IU psychologist's effort to improve community mental health care
With a pair of National Institutes of Health grants totaling nearly $3 million, Indiana University clinical psychologist Cara Lewis will tackle two major issues in the effort to bring evidence-based mental health treatment into community mental health centers.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kevin Fryling
kfryling@iu.edu
812-856-2988
Indiana University

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Researchers identify new spectrum disorder called ALPIM syndrome
Research by Jeremy D. Coplan, M.D., professor of psychiatry at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, and colleagues has documented a high rate of association between panic disorder and four domains of physical illness. The research could alter how physicians and psychiatrists view the boundaries within and between psychiatric and medical disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Ron Najman
ron.najman@downstate.edu
718-270-2696
SUNY Downstate Medical Center

Public Release: 9-Jul-2015
Scientific Reports
Neuroscientists establish brain-to-brain networks in primates, rodents
Neuroscientists at Duke University have introduced a new paradigm for brain-machine interfaces that investigates the physiological properties and adaptability of brain circuits, and how the brains of two or more animals can work together to complete simple tasks. These brain networks, or Brainets, were developed in rodents and primates, and are described in two articles to be published in the July 9, 2015, issue of Scientific Reports.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Fundacao BIAL

Contact: Susan Halkiotis
halkiotis@neuro.duke.edu
919-668-6031
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Jul-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Brain imaging shows how children inherit their parents' anxiety
A study in an extended family of monkeys provides important insights into how the risk of developing anxiety and depression is passed from parents to children. The study from the Department of Psychiatry and the Health Emotions Research Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows how an over-active brain circuit involving three brain areas inherited from generation to generation may set the stage for developing anxiety and depressive disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Susan Lampert Smith
Ssmith5@uwhealth.org
608-890-5643
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Researchers complete ASPIRE Phase III trial of vaginal ring for HIV prevention in women
In a first for HIV prevention, researchers have completed follow-up of participants in a pivotal Phase III trial that tested a vaginal ring for preventing HIV in women. The ring, which contains the ARV dapivirine, is meant to be worn for a month at a time. More than 2,600 African women took part in ASPIRE, one of two Phase III trials designed to support potential licensure of the ring. Results are expected early 2016.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Lisa Rossi
rossil@upmc.edu
412-916-3315
Microbicide Trials Network

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Clinical Psychological Science
Brain scans of passengers who experienced nightmare flight
Toronto -- A group of passengers who thought they were going to die when their plane ran out of fuel over the Atlantic Ocean in August, 2001 have had their brains scanned while recalling the terrifying moments to help science better understand trauma memories and how they are processed in the brain.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kelly Connelly
kconnelly@baycrest.org
416-785-2432
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care

Public Release: 22-Jun-2015
Endocrinology
Penn: Mom's stress alters babies' gut and brain through vaginal microbiome
Stress during the first trimester of pregnancy alters the population of microbes living in a mother's vagina. Those changes are passed on to newborns during birth and are associated with differences in their gut microbiome as well as their brain development, according to a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 19-Jun-2015
Cerebral Cortex
Thick cortex could be key in Down syndrome
The thickness of the brain's cerebral cortex could be a key to unlocking answers about intellectual development in youth with Down syndrome. It could also provide new insights to why individuals with this genetic neurodevelopmental disorder are highly susceptible to early onset Alzheimer's disease later in life.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Rachel Ewing
re39@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Child Development
Stress in low-income families can affect children's learning
Children living in low-income households who endure family instability and emotionally distant caregivers are at risk of having impaired cognitive abilities according to new research from the University of Rochester.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Monique Patenaude
monique.patenaude@rochester.edu
585-276-3693
University of Rochester

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Current Biology
Protein 'comet tails' propel cell recycling process
Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Lou Gehrig's, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's disease, all result in part from a defect in autophagy -- one way a cell removes and recycles misfolded proteins and pathogens. Researchers show for the first time that the formation of ephemeral compartments key in this process require actin polymerization by a complex of seven proteins, which creates 'comet tails.'
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, American Cancer Society

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Jun-2015
SLEEP 2015
Sleep
College students who binge drink have more delayed sleep timing, variable sleep schedules
A new study suggests that students who initiate and/or continue drinking and engage in binge drinking in college have more delayed sleep timing and more variable sleep schedules.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Lynn Celmer
lcelmer@aasmnet.org
630-737-9700
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Public Release: 11-Jun-2015
Child Neuropsychology
Movement in ADHD may help children think, perform better in school
The constant movement of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be distracting -- but the fidgeting also may improve their cognitive performance, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Children's Miracle Network, UC Davis MIND Institute Pilot Grant, MIND Institute Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center

Contact: Phyllis K. Brown
pkbrown@ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 10-Jun-2015
JAMA Psychiatry
Youth on the autism spectrum overly sensitive to sensory stimuli have brains that react differently
Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, a team of UCLA researchers has shown for the first time that children with autism spectrum disorder who are overly sensitive to sensory stimuli have brains that react differently.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, National Research Service

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 9-Jun-2015
Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Early intervention improves long-term outcomes for children with autism
Early intervention for toddlers with autism spectrum disorder helps improve their intellectual ability and reduces autism symptoms years after originally getting treatment, a new study shows.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Autism Center of Excellence, Autism Speaks

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 8-Jun-2015
Nature Neuroscience
Been there? Done that? If you are sure, thank your 'memory cells'
The witness on the stand says he saw the accused at the scene of the crime. Is he sure? How sure? The jury's verdict could hinge on that level of certainty. Many decisions we make every day are influenced by our memories and the confidence we have in them. But very little is known about how we decide whether we can trust a memory or not. A new Cedars-Sinai study provides some of the answers.
The Cedars-Sinai Department of Neurosurgery, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health Conte Center at Caltech, Pfeiffer Research Foundation

Contact: Sandy Van
sandy@prpacific.com
808-526-1708
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Jun-2015
Neuron
Long-term memory formation
A team of NYU neuroscientists has determined how a pair of growth factor molecules contributes to long-term memory formation.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Showing releases 1-25 out of 162.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2015 by AAAS, the science society.