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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 158.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice
Abusive parenting may have a biological basis
Parents who physically abuse their children appear to have a physiological response that subsequently triggers more harsh parenting when they attempt parenting in warm, positive ways, according to new research.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Administration for Children and Families

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 3-Oct-2013
CHOP genetics expert co-leads NIH grant on psychiatric illness in patients with deletion syndrome
Genetics experts from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia are among the top leaders of a major international collaboration researching why patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have an elevated risk of schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. Discovering genes implicated in the deletion syndrome, a multisystem disorder, may offer important clues to the biological causes of mental illness in the general population.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 3-Oct-2013
Penn co-leads $12 M NIH grant to study genetics of mental illnesses in deletion syndrome patients
A major international consortium co-led by Penn Medicine has received a $12 million National Institute of Mental Health grant for a large-scale genetics study investigating why patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have an increased risk of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
American Journal of Psychiatry
Smoking during pregnancy may increase risk of bipolar disorder in offspring
A study published today in the American Journal of Psychiatry suggests an association between smoking during pregnancy and increased risk for developing bipolar disorder in adult children. Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the New York State Psychiatric Institute evaluated offspring from a large cohort of pregnant women and found that maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with a twofold increased risk of bipolar disorder in their offspring.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Clinician observations of preschoolers' behavior help to predict ADHD at school age
Don't rely on one source of information about your preschoolers' inattention or hyperactivity. Rather, consider how your child behaves at home as well as information from his or her teacher and a clinician. This advice is found in Springer's Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. A study there examines how well parent, teacher, and clinician ratings of preschoolers' behavior are able to predict severity and diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder at age six.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Pediatrics
Psychotropic medication use, including stimulants, in young children leveling off
The use of psychotropic prescription medications to treat ADHD, mood disorders, anxiety and other mental health disorders in very young children appears to have leveled off.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Feuer
jim.feuer@cchmc.org
513-636-4656
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 26-Sep-2013
Cell Reports
Made to order at the synapse: Dynamics of protein synthesis at neuron tip
Protein synthesis in nerve cell dendrites underlies long-term memory formation in the brain, among other functions. Knowing how proteins are made to order at the synapse can help researchers better understand how memories are made. RNA translation is dictated by translational hotspots, where translation is occurring in a ribosome at any one time in a discrete spot.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Ellison Foundation, National Alliance for Research in Schizophrenia and Affective Disorders, Swedish Research Council

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Sep-2013
Journal of Abnormal Psychology
Past weight loss an overlooked factor in disordered eating
The focus of eating disorder research has largely been on the state of patients' thoughts, beliefs and emotions, with historically little focus on how current and past body weights contribute. A flurry of studies, the most recent published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, suggest that past body weight and relative weight loss should be taken into account.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences
Hunger pains
Binge-eating disorder, only recently designated as a diagnosis by the American Psychiatric Association in its official diagnostic manual of mental conditions, is associated with lifelong impairments comparable to those of bulimia nervosa, a long-established eating disorder with more dramatic symptoms.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Mental Health Burden Study, Shire Pharmaceuticals

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 13-Sep-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Pinpointing molecular path that makes antidepressants act quicker in mouse model
The reasons behind why it often takes people several weeks to feel the effect of newly prescribed antidepressants remains somewhat of a mystery -- and likely, a frustration to both patients and physicians. How an antidepressant works on the biochemistry and behavior in mice lets researchers tease out the relative influence of two brain proteins on the pharmacology of an antidepressant. They found increased nerve-cell generation in the hippocampus and a quicker response to the antidepressant.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Cooperative Drug Discovery Group for the Treatment of Mood Disorders

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
Neurology
Fat marker predicts cognitive decline in people with HIV
Johns Hopkins scientists have found that levels of certain fats found in cerebral spinal fluid can predict which patients with HIV are more likely to become intellectually impaired.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Annals of Internal Medicine
Social media + behavior psychology leads to HIV testing, better health behaviors
A new UCLA study demonstrates that an approach that combines behavioral science with social media and online communities can lead to increased AIDS testing and improved health behaviors among men at risk of HIV infection. The approach is also applicable across a variety of diseases.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, and others

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Sep-2013
Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Young adults on the autism spectrum face tough prospects for jobs and independent living
For young adults with autism spectrum disorders, making the transition from school to the first rites of independent adult life, including a first job and a home away from home, can be particularly challenging. Two new reports on a large, nationally representative sample show outcomes in employment and residential status are worse for young adults with ASDs than for those with other disabilities.
Autism Speaks, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Emch Foundation

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 4-Sep-2013
Frontiers in Psychology
Ability to delay gratification may be linked to social trust, new CU-Boulder study finds
A person's ability to delay gratification -- forgoing a smaller reward now for a larger reward in the future -- may depend on how trustworthy the person perceives the reward-giver to be, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Yuko Munakata
Munakata@colorado.edu
303-735-5499
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 3-Sep-2013
Cell Metabolism
Aging really is 'in your head'
Among scientists, the role of proteins called sirtuins in enhancing longevity has been hotly debated, driven by contradictory results from many different scientists. But new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may settle the dispute.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Ellison Medical Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Judy Martin
martinju@wustl.edu
314-286-0105
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 29-Aug-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Penn study: Shutting off neurons helps bullied mice overcome symptoms of depression
A new drug target to treat depression and other mood disorders may lie in a group of GABA neurons shown to contribute to symptoms like social withdrawal and increased anxiety, Penn Medicine researchers report in a new study in the Journal of Neuroscience.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 29-Aug-2013
Neuron
Neuroscientists find a key to reducing forgetting -- it's about the network
A team of neuroscientists has found a key to the reduction of forgetting. Their findings show that the better the coordination between two regions of the brain, the less likely we are to forget newly obtained information.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Dart Neuroscience

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 28-Aug-2013
Cerebral Cortex
Autistic children can outgrow difficulty understanding visual cues and sounds
Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have shown that high-functioning autism spectrum disorder children appear to outgrow a critical social communication disability. Younger children with ASD have trouble integrating the auditory and visual cues associated with speech, but the researchers found that the problem clears up in adolescence. The study was published today in the online edition of the journal Cerebral Cortex.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kim Newman
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 27-Aug-2013
Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Dating violence impedes victims' earnings
Dating violence in adolescence not only takes a physical and emotional toll on young women, it also leads to less education and lower earnings later in life, according to a first-of-its-kind study led by a Michigan State University researcher.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 26-Aug-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Touch and movement neurons shape the brain's internal image of the body
The brain's tactile and motor neurons, which perceive touch and control movement, may also respond to visual cues, according to researchers at Duke Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Press Office
lynn.garner@duke.edu
919-660-1306
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 25-Aug-2013
Nature Genetics
Study provides strongest clues to date for causes of schizophrenia
A new genome-wide association study estimates the number of different places in the human genome that are involved in schizophrenia. In particular, the study identifies 22 locations, including 13 that are newly discovered, that are believed to play a role in causing schizophrenia.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Sylvan Herman Foundation, Karolinska Institutet

Contact: Tom Hughes
tahughes@unch.unc.edu
919-966-6047
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 22-Aug-2013
Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Human brains are hardwired for empathy, friendship, study shows
A U.Va. study using brain scans has found that people experience risk to friends in the same way they feel risk to themselves.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Fariss Samarrai
fls4f@virginia.edu
434-924-3778
University of Virginia

Public Release: 21-Aug-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Mood is influenced by immune cells called to the brain in response to stress
New research shows that in a dynamic mind-body interaction during the interpretation of prolonged stress, cells from the immune system are recruited to the brain and promote symptoms of anxiety.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: John Sheridan
John.Sheridan@osumc.edu
614-293-3571
Ohio State University

Public Release: 21-Aug-2013
Science Translational Medicine
How women achieve a healthier weight may impact long-term health of offspring
New research from the University of Cincinnati suggests that the healthy weight and glucose control women achieve through weight-loss surgery don't necessarily translate into health benefits for their future children.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Ethicon Endo-Surgery Inc.

Contact: Dama Ewbank
dama.ewbank@uc.edu
513-558-4519
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Public Release: 20-Aug-2013
Neurology
Johns Hopkins researchers identify conditions most likely to kill encephalitis patients
People with severe encephalitis -- inflammation of the brain -- are much more likely to die if they develop severe swelling in the brain, intractable seizures or low blood platelet counts, regardless of the cause of their illness, according to new Johns Hopkins research.
NIH/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, and others

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdemon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Showing releases 126-150 out of 158.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

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