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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 163.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Neuron
SHY hypothesis explains that sleep is the price we pay for learning
Why do animals ranging from fruit flies to humans all need to sleep? After all, sleep disconnects them from their environment, puts them at risk and keeps them from seeking food or mates for large parts of the day.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Susan Lampert Smith
ssmith5@uwhealth.org
608-890-5643
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 7-Jan-2014
JAMA
Adults with mental illness have lower rate of decline in smoking
In recent years, the decline in smoking among individuals with mental illness was significantly less than among those without mental illness, although the rates of quitting smoking were greater among those receiving mental health treatment, according to a study in the Jan. 8 issue of JAMA.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Cecere
dcecere@challiance.org
617-591-4044
The JAMA Network Journals

Public Release: 6-Jan-2014
Pediatrics
Suicide risk doesn't differ in children taking 2 types of commonly prescribed antidepressants
A Vanderbilt University Medical Center study released today shows there is no evidence that the risk of suicide differs with two commonly prescribed antidepressants prescribed to children and adolescents.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Craig Boerner
craig.boerner@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 1-Jan-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Alcohol, tobacco, drug use far higher in severely mentally ill
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Southern California have found that rates of smoking, drinking and drug use are significantly higher among those who have psychotic disorders than in the general population. And that finding is of particular concern because individuals with severe mental illness are more likely to die at younger ages than people who don't have psychiatric disorders.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 23-Dec-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers identify gene that influences the ability to remember faces
New findings suggest the oxytocin receptor, a gene known to influence mother-infant bonding and pair bonding in monogamous species, also plays a special role in the ability to remember faces. This research has important implications for disorders in which social information processing is disrupted, including autism spectrum disorder. In addition, the finding may lead to new strategies for improving social cognition in several psychiatric disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Marks Family Foundation

Contact: Lisa Newbern
lisa.newbern@emory.edu
404-727-7709
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 19-Dec-2013
Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association
Anxiety linked to higher long-term risk of stroke
This is the first study to link anxiety to a greater risk of stroke.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Darcy Spitz
darcy.spitz@heart.org
212-878-5940
American Heart Association

Public Release: 18-Dec-2013
JAMA Psychiatry
Markers of inflammation in the blood linked to aggressive behaviors
People with intermittent explosive disorder -- a psychiatric illness characterized by impulsivity, hostility and recurrent aggressive outbursts -- have elevated levels of two markers of systemic inflammation in their blood. The study documents a direct relationship between inflammatory markers and impulsive aggression that is not seen in people in good mental health or with other psychiatric disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, University of Colorado, Denver

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 16-Dec-2013
Mind, Brain and Education
Bedtime for toddlers: Timing is everything, says CU-Boulder study
The bedtime you select for your toddler may be out of sync with his or her internal body clock, which can contribute to difficulties for youngsters attempting to settle in for the night, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Monique LeBourgeois
Monique.LeBourgeois@colorado.edu
303-492-4584
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 16-Dec-2013
International Journal of General Medicine
Regenstrief and IU investigators identify first biomarker linked to delirium duration
Researchers from the Regenstrief Institute and the Indiana University Center for Aging Research have identified the first biomarker that appears to be linked to the duration of delirium. This novel role for S100-beta as a biomarker for delirium duration in critically ill patients may have important implications for refining future delirium treatment in intensive care unit patients.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2013
Schizophrenia Bulletin
Heavy marijuana users have abnormal brain structure and poor memory
Teens who were heavy marijuana users had abnormal changes in their brains related to memory and performed poorly on memory tasks, reports a new study. The brain abnormalities and memory problems were observed in the subjects' early twenties, two years after they stopped smoking marijuana, possibly indicating long-term effects. Memory-related structures in their brains appeared to shrink. The younger drug abuse starts, the more abnormal the brain appeared. The marijuana-related brain abnormalities look similar to schizophrenia-related brain abnormalities.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 12-Dec-2013
Science
Sniffing out danger: Rutgers scientists say fearful memories can trigger heightened sense of smell
Neuroscientists at Rutgers University studying the olfactory -- sense of smell -- system in mice have discovered that fear reaction can occur at the sensory level, even before the brain has the opportunity to interpret that the odor could mean trouble.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Robin Lally
rlally@ucm.rutgers.edu
732-932-7084 x652
Rutgers University

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
52nd Annual Meeting of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Neuropsychopharmacology
Aging and gene expression -- possible links to autism and schizophrenia in offspring
Advanced paternal age has been associated with greater risk for psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism. With an increase in paternal age, there is a greater frequency of certain types of mutations that contribute to these disorders in offspring. Recent research, however, looks beyond the genetic code to "epigenetic effects," which do not involve changes in the genes themselves, but rather in how they are expressed to determine one's characteristics.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Simon Foundation, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation/NARSAD Young Investigator Award

Contact: Laura Hill
lhill@acnp.org
American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

Public Release: 6-Dec-2013
Archives of Psychiatric Nursing
To improve foster care, add a psychiatric nurse to treatment team
Mental health nurses are a valuable addition to the team that treats teens who have psychiatric problems and are in the foster care system.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Nancy Solomon
solomonn@slu.edu
314-977-8017
Saint Louis University

Public Release: 5-Dec-2013
Cell Reports
Gene found to be crucial for formation of certain brain circuitry
Using a powerful gene-hunting technique for the first time in mammalian brain cells, researchers at Johns Hopkins report they have identified a gene involved in building the circuitry that relays signals through the brain. The gene is a likely player in the aging process in the brain, the researchers say.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
443-903-7607
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 5-Dec-2013
Cell
Probiotic therapy alleviates autism-like behaviors in mice
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is diagnosed when individuals exhibit characteristic behaviors, decreased social interactions, and impaired communication. Curiously, many with ASD also suffer from gastrointestinal issues, like abdominal cramps and constipation. Guided by this co-occurrence of brain and gut problems, researchers at the California Institute Technology are investigating a bacterium that alleviates GI and behavioral symptoms in autistic-like mice, introducing a potentially transformative probiotic therapy for autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
mr@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 2-Dec-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Brain connectivity study reveals striking differences between men and women
A new brain connectivity study from Penn Medicine published today in the Proceedings of National Academies of Sciences found striking differences in the neural wiring of men and women that's lending credence to some commonly-held beliefs about their behavior.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Nov-2013
JAMA Neurology
Brain imaging differences in infants at genetic risk for Alzheimer's
Researchers at Brown University and Banner Alzheimer's Institute have found that infants who carry a gene associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease tend to have differences in brain development compared to infants who do not carry the gene. The findings do not mean that these infants will get Alzheimer's, but they may be a step toward understanding how this gene confers risk much later in life.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2013
AIDS Patient Care and STDs
High HIV knowledge and risky sexual behavior not associated with HIV testing in young adolescents
New research from Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine has found that teens most likely to be tested for HIV had strong partner communication about HIV and were in committed relationships. Having high knowledge about HIV and engaging in risky sexual activity did not increase testing. The study of nearly 1,000 Bronx, NY teens was published in the November issue of AIDS Patient Care and STDs.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Deirdre Branley
sciencenews@einstein.yu.edu
718-430-3101
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Nov-2013
Cell
UCLA first to map autism-risk genes by function
UCLA neuroscientists are the first to map groups of autism-risk genes by function, and uncover how mutations disrupt fetal brain development. Their findings prioritize genetic targets for future research and shed light on autism's molecular origins.
Simons Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Elaine Schmidt
eschmidt@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2272
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Nov-2013
Neuron
Focusing on faces
Difficulties in social interaction are considered to be one of the behavioral hallmarks of autism spectrum disorders. Previous studies have shown differences in how the brains of autistic individuals process sensory information about faces. Now, a team led Caltech neuroscientist Ralph Adolphs has made the first recordings of the firings of single neurons in the brains of autistic individuals, and has found specific neurons that show reduced processing of the eye region of faces.
Simons Foundation, Moore Foundation, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Autism Speaks, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Nov-2013
JAMA Psychiatry
PTSD raises risk for obesity in women
Women with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) gain weight more rapidly and are more likely to be overweight or obese than women without the disorder, find researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and Harvard School of Public Health. It is the first study to look at the relationship between PTSD and obesity over time. Results appear online in JAMA Psychiatry.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Timothy S. Paul
tp2111@columbia.edu
212-305-2676
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 20-Nov-2013
2013 American Heart Association Scientific Session
Mental stress + heart disease: Stronger presence in women under 50
Researchers have found that women younger than 50 with a recent heart attack are more likely to experience restricted blood flow to the heart (myocardial ischemia) in response to psychological stress.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jennifer Johnson
jrjohn9@emory.edu
404-727-5696
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Nov-2013
Neuron
Neurons in brain's 'face recognition center' respond differently in patients with autism
In what are believed to be the first studies of their kind, Cedars-Sinai researchers recording the real-time firing of individual nerve cells in the brain found that a specific type of neuron in a structure called the amygdala performed differently in people who suffer from autism spectrum disorder than in those who do not.
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, and others

Contact: Sandy Van
sandy@prpacific.com
808-526-1708
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
Animal Cognition
Monkeys can point to objects they do not report seeing
Are monkeys, like humans, able to ascertain where objects are located without much more than a sideways glance? Quite likely, says Lau Andersen of the Aarhus University in Denmark, lead author of a study conducted at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center of Emory University, published in Springer's journal Animal Cognition. The study finds that monkeys are able to localize stimuli they do not perceive.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Alexander Brown
alexander.brown@springer.com
212-620-8063
Springer Science+Business Media

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Psychiatric Services
Most teen mental health problems go untreated
More than half of adolescents with psychiatric disorders receive no treatment of any sort, says a new study by E. Jane Costello, a Duke University professor of psychology and epidemiology and associate director of the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy. When treatment does occur, the providers are rarely mental health specialists.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Alison Jones
alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Showing releases 126-150 out of 163.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

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