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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 158.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 9-Jul-2013
Translational Psychiatry
UC Davis MIND Institute researchers find exposure to maternal antibodies affects behavior
Researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute have found that prenatal exposure to specific combinations of antibodies found only in mothers of children with autism leads to changes in the brain that adversely affect behavior and development.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, California National Primate Research Center

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 5-Jul-2013
Qualitative Health Research
Cosmetic surgery to look whiter fails to boost women's self-esteem
Many black or racially mixed women in Venezuela are undergoing nose jobs in an effort to look whiter, but the procedure only temporarily improves their self esteem and body image in a culture that values whiteness, a Dartmouth College study finds.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 3-Jul-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Exercise reorganizes the brain to be more resilient to stress
A research team based at Princeton University found that physical activity reorganizes the brain so that its response to stress is reduced and anxiety is less likely to interfere with normal brain function.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Morgan Kelly
mgnkelly@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 2-Jul-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Brain sets prices with emotional value
You might be falling in love with that new car, but you probably wouldn't pay as much for it if you could resist the feeling. Researchers at Duke University who study how the brain values things -- a field called neuroeconomics -- have found that your feelings about something and the value you put on it are calculated similarly in a specific area of the brain.
NIH/National Institute of Aging, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Ashley Yeager
ashley.yeager@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 1-Jul-2013
Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Brain differences seen in depressed preschoolers
A key brain structure that regulates emotions works differently in preschoolers with depression compared with their healthy peers, according to new research at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Klingenstein Third Generation Foundation, CHADS Coalition

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 25-Jun-2013
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Involving community group in depression care improves coping among low-income patients, study finds
Improving care for depression in low-income communities -- places where such help for depression is frequently unavailable or hard to find -- provides greater benefits to those in need when community groups such as churches and even barber shops help lead the planning process, according to a new study. Involving community groups in depression care improved clients' mental health, increased physical activity, lowered their risk of becoming homeless and decreased hospitalizations for behavioral problems.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, California Community Foundation

Contact: Warren Robak
robak@rand.org
310-451-6913
RAND Corporation

Public Release: 21-Jun-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Study shows a solitary mutation can destroy critical 'window' of early brain development
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have shown in animal models that brain damage caused by the loss of a single copy of a gene during very early childhood development can cause a lifetime of behavioral and intellectual problems.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 20-Jun-2013
PLOS ONE
Elevated gluten antibodies found in children with autism but no link to celiac disease
Elevated antibodies to gluten proteins of wheat found in children with autism in comparison to those without autism. Results of a new study also indicated an association between the elevated antibodies and the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms in the affected children. They did not find any connection, however, between the elevated antibodies and celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder known to be triggered by gluten. The results were e-published in the journal PLOS ONE.
Autism Genetic Resource Exchange Consortium, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Defense

Contact: Elizabeth Streich
eas2125@cumc.columbia.edu
212-305-3689
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Jun-2013
Brain re-training may improve memory, focus in schizophrenia
Much like physical exercise can re-chisel the body, researchers hope targeted mental workouts can sharpen the memory, focus and function of adults with schizophrenia.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@gru.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University

Public Release: 19-Jun-2013
PLOS ONE
Carnegie Mellon researchers identify emotions based on brain activity
For the first time, scientists at Carnegie Mellon University have identified which emotion a person is experiencing based on brain activity. The study combines functional magnetic resonance imaging and machine learning to measure brain signals to accurately read emotions in individuals. The findings illustrate how the brain categorizes feelings, giving researchers the first reliable process to analyze emotions. Until now, research on emotions has been long stymied by the lack of reliable methods to evaluate them.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 17-Jun-2013
Molecular Psychiatry
Rare genomic mutations found in 10 families with early-onset, familial Alzheimer's disease
Massachusetts General Hospital researchers have discovered a type of mutation known as copy-number variants -- deletions, duplications, or rearrangements of human genomic DNA -- in affected members of 10 families with early-onset Alzheimer's. These are the first new early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease gene mutations to be reported since 1995.
Cure Alzheimer's Fund, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Mike Morrison
mdmorrison@partners.org
617-724-6425
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 11-Jun-2013
NIH awards UCI $10 million to study early-life origins of adolescent mental disorders
With $10 million in new federal funding, UC Irvine researchers will study how maternal signals and care before and after birth may increase an infant's vulnerability to adolescent cognitive and emotional problems, such as risky behaviors, addiction and depression.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 9-Jun-2013
Science
Mice give new clues to origins of OCD
Columbia Psychiatry researchers have identified what they think may be a mechanism underlying the development of compulsive behaviors. The finding suggests possible approaches to treating or preventing certain characteristics of OCD.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. Scholars Program, Irving Institute for Clinical and Translation Research

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@cumc.columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Jun-2013
Science
MIT study sheds light on what causes compulsive behavior, could improve OCD treatments
By activating a brain circuit that controls compulsive behavior, MIT neuroscientists have shown that they can block a compulsive behavior in mice -- a result that could help researchers develop new treatments for diseases such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette's syndrome.
Simons Initiative on Autism and the Brain, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 5-Jun-2013
Science Translational Medicine
Fear learning studies point to a potential new treatment for PTSD
An opioid receptor agonist can reduce PTSD-like symptoms in an animal model. Additional data from humans strengthen the case for opioid receptors' involvement in regulating fear learning.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Jun-2013
Journal of Traumatic Stress
CWRU researchers find half of those diagnosed with PTSD also suffer from depression
About one of every two people diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder also suffer symptoms of depression, according to new research by Case Western Reserve University's Department of Psychological Sciences.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 4-Jun-2013
American Journal of Psychiatry
Altered neural circuitry may lead to anorexia and bulimia
A landmark study, with first author Tyson Oberndorfer, M.D., and led by Walter H. Kaye, M.D., professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, suggests that the altered function of neural circuitry contributes to restricted eating in anorexia and overeating in bulimia. The research may offer a pathway to new and more effective treatments for these serious eating disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Price Foundation

Contact: Debra Kain
ddkain@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 4-Jun-2013
Journal of Visualized Experiments
Fear: A justified response or faulty wiring?
On June 3, 2013, a new article studying amygdala activity in human beings will be published as part of JoVE Behavior, a new section of the video journal that focuses on the behavioral sciences. The technique, developed by Dr. Fred Helmstetter and his research group at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, studies how the brain responds to anticipated painful stimuli, in this case an electric shock, in volunteer test subjects.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Rachel Greene
press@jove.com
617-250-8451
The Journal of Visualized Experiments

Public Release: 28-May-2013
Translational Psychiatry
Family studies suggest rare genetic mutations team up to cause schizophrenia
Using a novel method of analyzing genetic variations in families, researchers at Johns Hopkins have found that individually harmless genetic variations affecting related biochemical processes may team up to increase the risk of schizophrenia. They say their findings, reported May 28 in Translational Psychiatry, bring some clarity to the murky relationship between genetics and schizophrenia, and may lead to a genetic test that can predict which medications will be effective for individual patients.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Brain Science Institute

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 21-May-2013
Molecular Psychiatry
Genetic predictors of postpartum depression uncovered by Hopkins researchers
Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered specific chemical alterations in two genes that, when present during pregnancy, reliably predict whether a woman will develop postpartum depression.
Solomon & Rebecca Baker Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 21-May-2013
PLOS Medicine
Integrating mental health care into HIV care
The integration of mental health interventions into HIV prevention and treatment platforms can reduce the opportunity costs of care and improve treatment outcomes, argues a new Policy Forum article published in this week's PLOS Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Fiona Godwin
fgodwin@plos.org
01-223-442-834
PLOS

Public Release: 20-May-2013
Pediatrics
First long-term study reveals link between childhood ADHD and obesity
A new study conducted by researchers at the Child Study Center at NYU Langone Medical Center found men diagnosed as children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder were twice as likely to be obese in a 33-year follow-up study compared to men who were not diagnosed with the condition. The study appears in the May 20 online edition of Pediatrics.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, European Commission

Contact: Allison Clair
allison.clair@nyumc.org
212-404-3753
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-May-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Circadian clock gene rhythms in brain altered in depression, UC Irvine Health study finds
UC Irvine Health researchers have helped discover that genes controlling circadian clock rhythms are profoundly altered in the brains of people with severe depression. These clock genes regulate 24-hour circadian rhythms affecting hormonal, body temperature, sleep and behavioral patterns.
Pritzker Neuropsychiatric Disorders Research Fund, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 13-May-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Out of sync with the world: Body clocks of depressed people are altered at cell level
Every cell in our bodies runs on a 24-hour clock, tuned to the night-day, light-dark cycles that have ruled us since the dawn of humanity. But new research shows that the clock may be broken in the brains of people with depression -- even at the level of the gene activity inside their brain cells.
Neuropsychiatric Disorders Research Fund, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 9-May-2013
Psychological Science
Social connections drive the 'upward spiral' of positive emotions and health
People who experience warmer, more upbeat emotions may have better physical health because they make more social connections, according to a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Showing releases 126-150 out of 158.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

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