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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 155.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 20-Nov-2013
Neuron
Neurons in brain's 'face recognition center' respond differently in patients with autism
In what are believed to be the first studies of their kind, Cedars-Sinai researchers recording the real-time firing of individual nerve cells in the brain found that a specific type of neuron in a structure called the amygdala performed differently in people who suffer from autism spectrum disorder than in those who do not.
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, and others

Contact: Sandy Van
sandy@prpacific.com
808-526-1708
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
Animal Cognition
Monkeys can point to objects they do not report seeing
Are monkeys, like humans, able to ascertain where objects are located without much more than a sideways glance? Quite likely, says Lau Andersen of the Aarhus University in Denmark, lead author of a study conducted at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center of Emory University, published in Springer's journal Animal Cognition. The study finds that monkeys are able to localize stimuli they do not perceive.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Center for Research Resources

Contact: Alexander Brown
alexander.brown@springer.com
212-620-8063
Springer Science+Business Media

Public Release: 18-Nov-2013
Psychiatric Services
Most teen mental health problems go untreated
More than half of adolescents with psychiatric disorders receive no treatment of any sort, says a new study by E. Jane Costello, a Duke University professor of psychology and epidemiology and associate director of the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy. When treatment does occur, the providers are rarely mental health specialists.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Alison Jones
alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Regenstrief and IU study: Older adults with severe mental illness challenge healthcare system
Although older adults with serious mental illness didn't have more recorded physical illness and had fewer outpatient visits to primary care physicians, they made more medical emergency department visits and had considerably longer medical hospitalizations than older adults without mental illness according to a study conducted by researchers from the Regenstrief Institute and the Indiana University Center for Aging Research.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 14-Nov-2013
Journal of Sleep Research
Bradley Hospital researchers link lack of sleep in teens to higher risk of illness
Newly released findings from Bradley Hospital published in the Journal of Sleep Research have found that acute illnesses, such as colds, flu, and gastroenteritis were more common among healthy adolescents who got less sleep at night. Additionally, the regularity of teens' sleep schedules was found to impact their health. The study, titled "Sleep patterns are associated with common illness in adolescents," was led by Kathryn Orzech, Ph.D. of the Bradley Hospital Sleep Research Laboratory.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jill Reuter
jreuter@lifespan.org
401-444-6863
Lifespan

Public Release: 12-Nov-2013
Neuropsychology
Johns Hopkins research may improve early detection of dementia
Using scores obtained from cognitive tests, Johns Hopkins researchers think they have developed a model that could help determine whether memory loss in older adults is benign or a stop on the way to Alzheimer's disease.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 8-Nov-2013
Development and Psychopathology
Depression therapy effective for poor, minority moms
Faced with the dual demands of motherhood and poverty, as many as one-fourth of low-income minority mothers struggle with major depression. Now a new study shows that screening for the disorder and providing short-term, relationship-focused therapy through weekly home visits can relieve depression among minority mothers, even in the face of poverty and personal histories of abuse or violence.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Susan Hagen
susan.hagen@rochester.edu
585-276-4061
University of Rochester

Public Release: 7-Nov-2013
Nature
OHSU Vollum Institute research gives new insight into how antidepressants work in the brain
Research from Oregon Health & Science University's Vollum Institute, published in the current issue of Nature, is giving scientists a never-before-seen view of how nerve cells communicate with each other. That new view can give scientists a better understanding of how antidepressants work in the human brain -- and could lead to the development of better antidepressants with few or no side effects.
American Heart Association, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, and others

Contact: Todd Murphy
murphyt@ohsu.edu
503-494-8231
Oregon Health & Science University

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
Journal of Adolescent Research
Mothers' relationships can influence adolescent children's relationships, MU study finds
Gary Glick, doctoral candidate, the MU College of Arts & Science, Department of Psychological Sciences, found that mothers' relationships can influence adolescent children's relationships with their friends, particularly the negative and antagonistic aspects.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
873-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
CWRU study finds mending ruptures in client-therapist relationship has positive benefits
In order for prolonged exposure therapy, an evidence-based psychotherapy for post traumatic stress disorder, to reach its full potential, any misperceptions or ruptures in trust and communication between therapist and client need fixing, according to a new Case Western Reserve University study.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
Nature
New study identifies signs of autism in the first months of life
Researchers have identified signs of autism present in the first months of life. The researchers followed babies from birth until 3 years of age, using eye-tracking technology, to measure the way infants look at and respond to social cues. Infants later diagnosed with autism showed declining attention to the eyes of other people, from the age of 2 months onwards.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Simons Foundation, Marcus Foundation, Whitehead Foundation

Contact: Carrie Edwards
carrie.edwards@choa.org
404-785-7253
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
JAMA
Interactive computer program helps patients talk with their physician about depression
Patients who used an interactive computer program about depression while waiting to see their primary-care doctor were nearly twice as likely to ask about the condition and significantly more likely to receive a recommendation for antidepressant drugs or a mental-health referral from their physician, according to a new study by researchers at UC Davis.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Charles Casey
charles.casey@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9048
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
ISR Research Center for Group Dynamics Seminar Series on Violence and Aggression
Bad boys: Research predicts whether boys will grow out of it -- or not
Using the hi-tech tools of a new field called neurogenetics and a few simple questions for parents, a University of Michigan researcher is beginning to understand which boys are simply being boys and which may be headed for trouble.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Diane Swanbrow
swanbrow@umich.edu
734-647-9069
University of Michigan

Public Release: 4-Nov-2013
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Teens in child welfare system show higher drug abuse rate
Teenagers in the child welfare system are at higher-than-average risk of abusing marijuana, inhalants and other drugs, according to a study in the Nov. issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. However, the study also shows that parental involvement matters.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact: Debra Kain
ddkain@ucsd.edu
619-543-6202
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

Public Release: 1-Nov-2013
American Journal of Psychiatry
Bipolar and pregnant
New research offers one of the first in-depth views of how metabolism changes during pregnancy reduce the effect of a commonly used drug to treat bipolar disorder. The blood level of the drug decreased during pregnancy, resulting in worsening symptoms. The new findings can help physicians prevent bipolar manic and depressive episodes in their pregnant patients, which are risky for the health of the mother and her unborn child.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 31-Oct-2013
Science
Gene found to foster synapse formation in the brain
Researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have found that a gene already implicated in human speech disorders and epilepsy is also needed for vocalizations and synapse formation in mice. The finding, they say, adds to scientific understanding of how language develops, as well as the way synapses -- the connections among brain cells that enable us to think -- are formed. A description of their experiments appears in Science Express on Oct. 31.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
JAMA Pediatrics
Nurturing may protect kids from brain changes linked to poverty
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have identified changes in the brains of children growing up in poverty. Those changes can lead to lifelong problems like depression, learning difficulties and limitations in the ability to cope with stress. But the study showed that the extent of those changes was influenced strongly by whether parents were attentive and nurturing.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Anesthesiology
Neurotoxin effectively relieves bone cancer pain in dogs, Penn researchers find
By the time bone cancer is diagnosed in a pet dog, it is often too late to save the animal's life. Instead, the goal of treatment is to keep the dog as comfortable and free of pain as possible for as long as possible. A study by University of Pennsylvania veterinarians Dorothy Cimino Brown and Kimberly Agnello has demonstrated that a single spinal injection of a neurotoxin provided more relief from pain than the pain-relieving drugs that are typically used.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
American Journal of Public Health
Veterans who mismanage money four times more likely to become homeless
Military veterans who report having common financial problems, such as bouncing a check or going over their credit limit, are four times more likely to become homeless in the next year than veterans without such problems.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, US Department of Education

Contact: Tom Hughes
tahughes@unch.unc.edu
919-966-6047
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
Journal of Attention Disorders
What a difference a grade makes
Children with attention problems that emerge in first grade show poorer school performance for years afterward, including scoring lower on fifth grade reading. The poor performance occurred even if the attention problems were fleeting and improved after first grade. By contrast, children who developed attention problems starting in second grade performed as well as their peers in later years.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, US Department of Education

Contact: Alison Jones
alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 8-Oct-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Research uncovers new details about brain anatomy and language in young children
Researchers from Brown University and King's College London have uncovered new details about how brain anatomy influences language development in young kids. Using advanced MRI, they find that different parts of the brain appear to be important for language development at different ages. Surprisingly, anatomy did not predict language very well between the ages of 2 and 4, when language ability increases quickly. That underscores the importance of environment during this critical period.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice
Abusive parenting may have a biological basis
Parents who physically abuse their children appear to have a physiological response that subsequently triggers more harsh parenting when they attempt parenting in warm, positive ways, according to new research.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Administration for Children and Families

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 3-Oct-2013
CHOP genetics expert co-leads NIH grant on psychiatric illness in patients with deletion syndrome
Genetics experts from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia are among the top leaders of a major international collaboration researching why patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have an elevated risk of schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. Discovering genes implicated in the deletion syndrome, a multisystem disorder, may offer important clues to the biological causes of mental illness in the general population.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 3-Oct-2013
Penn co-leads $12 M NIH grant to study genetics of mental illnesses in deletion syndrome patients
A major international consortium co-led by Penn Medicine has received a $12 million National Institute of Mental Health grant for a large-scale genetics study investigating why patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have an increased risk of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
American Journal of Psychiatry
Smoking during pregnancy may increase risk of bipolar disorder in offspring
A study published today in the American Journal of Psychiatry suggests an association between smoking during pregnancy and increased risk for developing bipolar disorder in adult children. Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the New York State Psychiatric Institute evaluated offspring from a large cohort of pregnant women and found that maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with a twofold increased risk of bipolar disorder in their offspring.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Showing releases 126-150 out of 155.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

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