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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-164 out of 164.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Veterans' alcohol problems linked to stress on the home front
Regardless of traumatic events experienced during deployment, returning National Guard soldiers were more likely to develop a drinking problem if faced with civilian life setbacks, including job loss, legal problems, divorce, and serious financial and legal problems -- all commonplace in military families. Results of the study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health are published online in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
US Department of Defense, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Angela J. Beck
ajpmmedia@elsevier.com
734-764-8775
Elsevier Health Sciences

Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Vets' alcohol problems linked to stress on the home front
Regardless of traumatic events experienced during deployment, returning National Guard soldiers were more likely to develop a drinking problem if faced with civilian life setbacks, including job loss, legal problems, divorce, and serious financial and legal problems -- all commonplace in military families. Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found having at least one civilian stressor or a reported incident of sexual harassment during deployment raised the odds of alcohol use disorders.
US Department of Defense, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
New research shows lack of motivation affects cognitive performance in schizophrenia
New research from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health shows a significant relationship between motivational deficit and poor cognitive performance in people with schizophrenia.
Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kate Richards
media@camh.ca
416-595-6015
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
A blood test for suicide?
Johns Hopkins researchers say they have discovered a chemical alteration in a single human gene linked to stress reactions that, if confirmed in larger studies, could give doctors a simple blood test to reliably predict a person's risk of attempting suicide.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Lauren Nelson
lnelso35@jhmi.edu
410-955-8725
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
A new brain-based marker of stress susceptibility
Some people handle stressful situations better than others, and it's not all in their genes: Even identical twins show differences in how they respond to adversity. Researchers have identified an electrical pattern in the brains of genetically identical mice that predicts how well individual animals will fare in stressful situations. The results may eventually help researchers prevent a range of mental illnesses that have been linked with stress.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, International Mental Health Research Organization RSA, BBRF Sidney R. Baer Jr. Research Prize, Duke Institute for Brain Sciences

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Child Development
Stress tied to change in children's gene expression related to emotion regulation, physical health
In a new study, researchers found that maltreatment affects the way children's genes are activated, which has implications for their long-term development and health. The researchers examined DNA methylation, a biomechanical mechanism that helps cells control which genes are turned on or off, in the blood of 56 children ages 11 to 14. Disruptions in this system affect emotional behavior, stress levels, and the immune system. These findings echo those of earlier studies of rodents.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 24-Jul-2014
Neuron
Choice bias: A quirky byproduct of learning from reward
Many people value rewards they choose themselves more than rewards they merely receive, even when the rewards are actually equivalent. A new study in Neuron provides evidence that this long-observed quirk of behavior is a byproduct of how the brain reinforces learning from reward.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Nature
LSUHSC contributes to work identifying new DNA regions associated with schizophrenia
Nancy Buccola, assistant professor of clinical nursing at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Nursing, contributed samples used in a study reporting new locations of genetic material associated with schizophrenia and also suggesting a possible link between the immune system and schizophrenia.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Leslie Capo
lcapo@lsuhsc.edu
504-568-4806
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Common gene variants account for most of the genetic risk for autism
Nearly 60 percent of the risk of developing autism is genetic and most of that risk is caused by inherited variant genes that are common in the population and present in individuals without the disorder, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the July 20 edition of Nature Genetics.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Elizabeth Dowling
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Genetic risk for autism stems mostly from common genes
Using new statistical tools, Carnegie Mellon University's Kathryn Roeder has led an international team of researchers to discover that most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Health Psychology
Losing sleep over your divorce? Your blood pressure could suffer
It's normal for people to experience trouble sleeping after a divorce, but if sleep problems last too long, they can lead to potentially harmful increases in blood pressure, a new University of Arizona study finds. The research suggests that poor sleep quality might be one of the reasons divorce is linked to negative health effects.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Alexis Blue
ablue@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4386
University of Arizona

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Body Image
Study: Body Dysmorphic Disorder patients have higher risk of personal and appearance-based rejection sensitivity
Researchers have found that fear of being rejected because of one's appearance, as well as rejection sensitivity to general interpersonal situations, were significantly elevated in individuals with Body Dysmorphic Disorder. These fears, referred to as personal rejection sensitivity and appearance-based rejection sensitivity, can lead to diminished quality of life and poorer mental and overall health. Body Dymorphic Disorder is an under-recognized body image disorder that affects an estimated 1.7 to 2.4 percent of the population.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, US Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Ellen Slingsby
eslingsby@lifespan.org
401-444-6421
Lifespan

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Neuron
Working to loosen the grip of severe mental illness
In newly published research in the journal Neuron, Michael Cole of Rutgers has determined that the underlying brain architecture of a person at rest is basically the same as that of a person performing a variety of tasks. This is important to the study of mental illness, says Cole, because it is easier to analyze a brain at rest.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Rob Forman
robert.forman@rutgers.edu
973-972-7276
Rutgers University

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
Study shows link between inflammation in maternal blood and schizophrenia in offspring
Maternal inflammation as indicated by the presence in maternal blood of early gestational C-reactive protein -- an established inflammatory biomarker -- appears to be associated with greater risk for schizophrenia in offspring.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Showing releases 151-164 out of 164.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

     
   

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