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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 151-162 out of 162.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Autism after high school: Making the transition
The National Institute of Mental Health has awarded a grant to University of Kentucky College of Education Professor Lisa Ruble and a team of co-investigators to find ways to help reduce or eliminate the disconnect from needed services that often occurs when students with autism complete school.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jenny Wells
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Study gives new view on how cells control what comes in and out
A new study reveals that a form of calmodulin long thought to be dormant actually opens ion channels wide. The finding is likely to bring new insight into disorders caused by faulty control of these channels, such as cardiac arrhythmias, epilepsy and Parkinson's disease, the researchers say.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Parkinson Society Canada

Contact: Shawna Williams
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
CHOP and Temple receive NIH grant to explore eradicating HIV from hiding places in the brain
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Temple University have received a joint $4.3 million, four-year grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to investigate new methods to eradicate HIV that lurks in brain cells despite conventional antiviral treatments. The research, in cell cultures and animals, aims to set the stage for subsequently testing the most promising approaches in human patients.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: John Ascenzi
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Medical Anthropology Quarterly
CWRU researcher finds training officers about mental illness benefits prison's safety
Case Western Reserve University mental health researcher Joseph Galanek spent a cumulative nine months in an Oregon maximum-security prison to learn first-hand how the prison manages inmates with mental illness. What he found, through 430 hours of prison observations and interviews, is that inmates were treated humanely and security was better managed when cell block officers were trained to identify symptoms of mental illness and how to respond to them.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Susan Griffith
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Depression and Anxiety
Pre-enlistment mental disorders and suicidality among new US Army soldiers
Two new reports show that new soldiers and civilians do not differ in their probability of having at least one lifetime mental disorder but that some mental disorders are more common among new soldiers than civilians. In addition, the rates of pre-enlistment suicidality among new soldiers are comparable to matched civilians.
US Department of the Army, US Department of Health and Human Services, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Cameron
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Teens whose parents exert more psychological control have trouble with closeness, independence
A new longitudinal study has found that teens whose parents exerted psychological control over them at age 13 had problems establishing healthy friendships and romantic relationships both in adolescence and into adulthood. The study followed 184 ethnically and socioeconomically diverse teens from age 13 to 21. It found that giving in to 'peer pressure' was more common among teens whose parents used guilt, withdrawing love, fostering anxiety, or other psychologically manipulative tactics.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Hannah Klein
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level
A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Marie Curie Outgoing Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Erin White
Northwestern University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy
A new study conducted by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Tom Hughes
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests
A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before may boost later learning.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Defense

Contact: Marc Airhart
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Stress-related inflammation may increase risk for depression
Preexisting differences in the sensitivity of a key part of each individual's immune system to stress confer a greater risk of developing stress-related depression or anxiety
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Johnson and Johnson International Mental Health Research Organization, Irma T. Hirschl/Monique Weill-Caulier Trust, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Brain and Behavior Research Organization

Contact: Elizabeth Dowling
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Clinical Psychological Science
Teenage girls are exposed to more stressors that increase depression risk
Adolescence is often a turbulent time, and it is marked by substantially increased rates of depressive symptoms, especially among girls. New research indicates that this gender difference may be the result of girls' greater exposure to stressful interpersonal events, making them more likely to ruminate, and contributing to their risk of depression. The findings are published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Anna Mikulak
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Working memory hinders learning in schizophrenia
Trouble with working memory makes a distinct contribution to the difficulty people with schizophrenia sometimes have in learning, according to a new study. The researchers employed a specially designed experiment and computational models to distinguish the roles of working memory and reinforcement learning.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
Brown University

Showing releases 151-162 out of 162.

<< < 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7


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