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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 156.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Psychological Science
Having a sense of purpose may add years to your life
Feeling that you have a sense of purpose in life may help you live longer, no matter what your age, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research has clear implications for promoting positive aging and adult development, says lead researcher Patrick Hill of Carleton University in Canada.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bullying may have long-term health consequences
Bullied children may experience chronic, systemic inflammation that persists into adulthood, while bullies may actually reap health benefits of increasing their social status through bullying, according to researchers at Duke Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, William T. Grant Foundation, Economic and Social Research Council

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 8-May-2014
International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing
Listening to bipolar disorder: Smartphone app detects mood swings via voice analysis
A smartphone app that monitors subtle qualities of a person's voice during everyday phone conversations shows promise for detecting early signs of mood changes in people with bipolar disorder, a University of Michigan team reports. While the app still needs much testing before widespread use, early results from a small group of patients show its potential to monitor moods while protecting privacy.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 7-May-2014
Obstetrics & Gynecology
New care approach eases depression among women
Women who received collaborative care for depression at an obstetrics and gynecology clinic showed fewer symptoms after treatment than women receiving usual depression care in the same setting, University of Washington research found. In this model, the patient's physician, a mental health professional, and a depression manager work together with the patient. The collaborative approach comprises counseling, greater patient engagement, and more frequent followup than is typical of mental health care at specialty clinics.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: McKenna Princing
mckennap@uw.edu
206-221-9394
University of Washington

Public Release: 5-May-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Study finds family-based exposure therapy effective treatment for young children with OCD
A new study from the Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center has found that family-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is beneficial to young children between the ages of five and eight with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The study, now published online in JAMA Psychiatry, found developmentally sensitive family-based CBT that included exposure/response prevention was more effective in reducing OCD symptoms and functional impairment in this age group than a similarly structured relaxation program.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jill Reuter
jreuter@lifespan.org
401-444-6863
Lifespan

Public Release: 5-May-2014
JAMA
Genetic, environmental influences equally important risk for autism spectrum disorder
Researchers led by Mount Sinai found that individual risk of ASD and autistic disorder increased with greater genetic relatedness in families -- that is, persons with a sibling, half-sibling or cousin diagnosed with autism have an increased likelihood of developing ASD themselves.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Sid Dinsay
sid.dinsay@mountsinai.org
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 5-May-2014
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Dementia diagnosis twice as likely if older adult has schizophrenia; cancer less likely
Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University researchers who followed over 30,000 older adults for a decade have found the rate of dementia diagnosis for patients with schizophrenia to be twice as high as for patients without this chronic, severe and disabling brain disorder. Cancer, however, was less likely.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Child Development
Working memory differs by parents' education; effects persist into adolescence
A new longitudinal study has found that differences in working memory- the ability to hold information in your mind, think about it, and use it to guide behavior -- that exist at age 10 persist through the end of adolescence. The study also found that parents' education -- one common measure of socioeconomic status -- is related to children's performance on tasks of working memory. The researchers studied more than 300 10- through 13-year-olds over four years.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Nature
Overlooked cells hold keys to brain organization and disease, UCSF study shows
Scientists studying brain diseases may need to look beyond nerve cells and start paying attention to the star-shaped cells known as 'astrocytes,' because they play specialized roles in the development and maintenance of nerve circuits and may contribute to a wide range of disorders, according to a new study by UC San Francisco researchers.
NIH/National Institute for Neurological Diseases & Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Jeffrey Norris
jeffrey.norris@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Controlling brain waves to improve vision
Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois are using a novel technique to test brain waves to see how the brain processes external stimuli that do and don't reach our awareness.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Beckman Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Maeve Reilly
mjreilly@illinois.edu
217-244-7316
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Cell Reports
Researchers pinpoint protein crucial for development of biological rhythms in mice
Johns Hopkins researchers report that they have identified a protein essential to the formation of the tiny brain region in mice that coordinates sleep-wake cycles and other so-called circadian rhythms. By disabling the gene for that key protein in test animals, the scientists were able to home in on the mechanism by which that brain region, known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus or SCN, becomes the body's master clock while the embryo is developing.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Brain Science Institute

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Neuron
Neurons in the brain tune into different frequencies for different spatial memory tasks
Your brain transmits information about your current location and memories of past locations over the same neural pathways using different frequencies of a rhythmic electrical activity called gamma waves, report neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin. The research, published in the journal Neuron on April 17, may provide insight into the cognitive and memory disruptions seen in diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's, in which gamma waves are disturbed.
Klingenstein Fund, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Computerized counseling reduces HIV-1 viral load, sexual transmission risk
New research shows that computerized counseling is a promising intervention for increased ART adherence and safer sex, especially for individuals with problems in these areas. This is the first intervention to report improved ART adherence, viral suppression, and reduced secondary sexual transmission risk behavior.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/ Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Christopher James
christopher.james@nyu.edu
212-998-6876
New York University

Public Release: 14-Apr-2014
Lancet Global Health
Community-based HIV prevention can boost testing, help reduce new infections
Study finds that communities in Africa and Thailand that worked together on HIV-prevention efforts saw not only a rise in HIV screening but a drop in new infections, demonstrating that programs such as this can encourage community-wide testing and help reduce HIV transmission.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, and others

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 13-Apr-2014
Nature Genetics
Finding the switch: Researchers create roadmap for gene expression
In a new study, researchers from North Carolina State University, UNC-Chapel Hill and other institutions have taken the first steps toward creating a roadmap that may help scientists narrow down the genetic cause of numerous diseases. Their work also sheds new light on how heredity and environment can affect gene expression.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Tracey Peake
tracey_peake@ncsu.edu
919-515-6142
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 9-Apr-2014
UCLA/RAND community research team win prestigious translational science award
A team of community leaders and researchers from UCLA and RAND has been awarded the 2014 Joint Team Science Award in recognition of a 10-year effort to conduct community engaged, population-based translational science to improve care for depression in low-income areas.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 31-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Experimental cancer drug reverses schizophrenia in adolescent mice
Johns Hopkins researchers say that an experimental anticancer compound appears to have reversed behaviors associated with schizophrenia and restored some lost brain cell function in adolescent mice with a rodent version of the devastating mental illness.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Maryland Stem Cell Research Fund, and others

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 30-Mar-2014
Nature Neuroscience
A new approach to Huntington's disease?
Tweaking a specific cell type's ability to absorb potassium in the brain improved walking and prolonged survival in a mouse model of Huntington's disease, reports a University of California Los Angeles study published March 30 in the online edition of Nature Neuroscience. The discovery could point to new drug targets for treating the devastating disease, which strikes one in every 20,000 Americans.
CHDI Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Elaine Schmidt
eschmidt@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2272
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 27-Mar-2014
The Journal of Neuroscience
Brain scans link concern for justice with reason, not emotion
People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion, according to new brain scan research from the University of Chicago Department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, John Templeton Foundation

Contact: Jann Ingmire
jingmire@uchicago.edu
773-702-2772
University of Chicago

Public Release: 27-Mar-2014
PLOS ONE
Neurobiologists find chronic stress in early life causes anxiety, aggression in adulthood
In experiments to assess the impacts of social stress upon adolescent mice, both at the time they are experienced and during adulthood, a Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory team conducted many different kinds of stress tests and means of measuring their impacts. The research indicates that a 'hostile environment in adolescence disturbs psychoemotional state and social behaviors of animals in adult life,' the team says.
Russian Foundation for Basic Research, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-5055
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Pediatrics
Integrating mental health services in pediatric practices feasible, effective, Pitt finds
Brief behavioral and mental health programs for children can be effectively provided within pediatric practices as an alternative to being referred to a community specialist, University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences researchers found in a National Institutes of Health-funded randomized trial.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Psychiatric Services
Lifestyle interventions can prevent major depression in adults with mild symptoms
Discussions with a dietary coach to learn about healthy eating were as effective as meeting with a counselor for problem-solving or 'talk' therapy in preventing major depression among older black and white adults with mild symptoms of the mood disorder, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Maryland. Their findings were published online recently in Psychiatric Services.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Endowment in Geriatric Psychiatry, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 14-Mar-2014
PLOS ONE
Contagious yawning may not be linked to empathy; still largely unexplained
While previous studies have suggested a connection between contagious yawning and empathy, new research from the Duke Center for Human Genome Variation finds that contagious yawning may decrease with age and is not strongly related to variables like empathy, tiredness and energy levels.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Ellison Medical Foundation

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Mar-2014
Child Development
Iron deficiency important to assess in children adopted from institutional settings
A new longitudinal study finds that children who spent more time in institutional settings (like orphanages) prior to adoption, and had more severe iron deficiency at the time of adoption, were more likely to have lower IQs and poorer higher-order thinking skills a year later. The study -- which followed children adopted into US families from Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Asia -- suggests that iron supplements and cognitive interventions could be helpful in counteracting these effects.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 5-Mar-2014
Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Atypical development in the siblings of children with autism is detectable at 12 months
Atypical development can be detected as early as 12 months of age among the siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder, a study published by researchers with the University of California Davis MIND Institute and University of California Los Angeles has found.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Showing releases 51-75 out of 156.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

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