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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 163.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Neuron
Working to loosen the grip of severe mental illness
In newly published research in the journal Neuron, Michael Cole of Rutgers has determined that the underlying brain architecture of a person at rest is basically the same as that of a person performing a variety of tasks. This is important to the study of mental illness, says Cole, because it is easier to analyze a brain at rest.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Rob Forman
robert.forman@rutgers.edu
973-972-7276
Rutgers University

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
Study shows link between inflammation in maternal blood and schizophrenia in offspring
Maternal inflammation as indicated by the presence in maternal blood of early gestational C-reactive protein -- an established inflammatory biomarker -- appears to be associated with greater risk for schizophrenia in offspring.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 3-Jul-2014
Cell Stem Cell
Schizophrenia-associated gene variation affects brain cell development
Johns Hopkins researchers have begun to connect the dots between a schizophrenia-linked genetic variation and its effect on the developing brain. As they report July 3 in the journal Cell Stem Cell, their experiments show that the loss of a particular gene alters the skeletons of developing brain cells, which in turn disrupts the orderly layers those cells would normally form.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, Maryland Stem Cell Research Fund, Simons Foundation

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Cell
Cellular gates for sodium and calcium controlled by common element of ancient origin
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have spotted a strong family trait in two distant relatives: the channels that permit entry of sodium and calcium ions into cells turn out to share similar means for regulating ion intake, they say. Both types of channels are critical to life. Having the right concentrations of sodium and calcium ions in cells enables healthy brain communication, heart contraction and many other processes.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 19-Jun-2014
Nature Protocols
Seeing the inner workings of the brain made easier by new technique from Stanford
Bio-X scientists have improved on their original technique for peering into the intact brain, making it more reliable and safer. The results could help scientists unravel the inner connections of how thoughts, memories or diseases arise.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Simons Foundation

Contact: Amy Adams
amyadams@stanford.edu
650-796-3695
Stanford University

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Study finds difference in way bipolar disorder affects brains of children versus adults
A new study from Bradley Hospital has found that bipolar children have greater activation in the right amygdala -- a brain region very important for emotional reaction -- than bipolar adults when viewing emotional faces. The study, now published online in JAMA Psychiatry, suggests that bipolar children might benefit from treatments that target emotional face identification, such as computer based 'brain games' or group and individual therapy.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jill Reuter
jreuter@lifespan.org
401-444-6863
Lifespan

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Penn team links placental marker of prenatal stress to brain mitochondrial dysfunction
New findings by University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine scientists suggest that an enzyme found in the placenta is likely playing an important role in translating stress experienced by a mother early in pregnancy into a reprogramming of her developing baby's brain.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
British Medical Journal
Unintended danger from antidepressant warnings
Following 2003 FDA warnings about a potential danger to young people taking antidepressants, antidepressant use plummeted and attempted suicide by psychotropic drug poisoning increased proportionally by 22 percent.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
Neuron
Fight-or-flight chemical prepares cells to shift brain from subdued to alert
A new study from The Johns Hopkins University shows that the brain cells surrounding a mouse's neurons do much more than fill space. According to the researchers, the cells, called astrocytes because of their star-shaped appearance, can monitor and respond to nearby neural activity, but only after being activated by the fight-or-flight chemical norepinephrine. Because astrocytes can alter the activity of neurons, the findings suggest that astrocytes may help control the brain's ability to focus.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 18-Jun-2014
Neuron
Scripps Florida scientists pinpoint how genetic mutation causes early brain damage
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have shed light on how a specific kind of genetic mutation can cause damage during early brain development that results in lifelong learning and behavioral disabilities. The work suggests new possibilities for therapeutic intervention.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, University of Califronia, Irvine, State of Florida

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 16-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How our brains store recent memories, cell by single cell
Confirming what neurocomputational theorists have long suspected, researchers at the Dignity Health Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix, Ariz., and University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that the human brain locks down episodic memories in the hippocampus, committing each recollection to a distinct, distributed fraction of individual cells.
US Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Research Service, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 12-Jun-2014
Neuron
Synchronized brain waves enable rapid learning
The human mind can rapidly absorb and analyze new information as it flits from thought to thought. These quickly changing brain states may be encoded by synchronization of brain waves across different brain regions, according to a new study from MIT neuroscientists.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 12-Jun-2014
Child Development
New study sheds light on what happens to 'cool' kids
A new study has found that teens who tried to act cool in early adolescence were more likely to experience a range of problems in early adulthood. Teens needed more and more extreme behaviors to appear cool, eventually engaging in serious criminal behaviors in addition to alcohol and drug use. By young adulthood, they were found to be less competent overall than their less 'cool' peers. Teens were followed from age 13 to age 23.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
UO researchers use rhythmic brain activity to track memories in progress
Using EEG electrodes attached to the scalps of 25 student subjects, University of Oregon researchers have tapped the rhythm of memories as they occur in near real time in the human brain.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
Five-question clinical tool the first to help screen risk of violence in military veterans
A new brief, five-question screening tool can help clinicians identify which veterans may be at greater risk of violence, according to a new study.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, US Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Tom Hughes
Thomas.Hughes@unchealth.unc.edu
919-966-6047
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Health Affairs
Simple change to Medicare Part D would yield $5 billion in savings
The federal government could save over $5 billion in the first year by changing the way it assigns Part D plans for Medicare beneficiaries eligible for low-income subsidies, according to the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. The results of the study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Health and Human Services, will be published in the June issue of the journal Health Affairs.
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
PTSD treatment cost-effective when patients given choice
A cost-analysis of post-traumatic stress disorder treatments shows that letting patients choose their course of treatment -- either psychotherapy or medication -- is less expensive than assigning a treatment and provides a higher quality of life for patients.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Contact: Molly McElroy
mollywmc@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 28-May-2014
Neuron
Uncovering clues to the genetic cause of schizophrenia
The overall number and nature of mutations -- rather than the presence of any single mutation -- influences an individual's risk of developing schizophrenia, as well as its severity, according to a discovery by Columbia University Medical Center researchers published in the latest issue of Neuron. The findings could have important implications for the early detection and treatment of schizophrenia.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Lucky Tran
lt2549@columbia.edu
212-305-3689
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 26-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sex-specific changes in cerebral blood flow begin at puberty, Penn study finds
Penn Medicine researchers have discovered that cerebral blood flow levels decreased similarly in males and females before puberty, but saw them diverge sharply in puberty, with levels increasing in females while decreasing further in males, which could give hints as to developing differences in behavior in men and women and sex-specific pre-dispositions to certain psychiatric disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Brain and Behavior Foundation

Contact: Lee-Ann Donegan
leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5660
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-May-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Role of calcium in familial Alzheimer's disease clarified, pointing to new therapeutics
Mutations in two presenilin proteins associated with familial Alzheimer's disease disrupt the flow of calcium ions within neurons. Researchers have found that suppressing the hyperactivity of the calcium channels alleviated FAD-like symptoms in mice models of the disease. These new observations suggest that approaches based on modulating calcium signaling could be explored for new AD therapies.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 13-May-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
Researchers identify genetic marker linked to OCD
A group of researchers led by Johns Hopkins scientists say they have identified a genetic marker that may be associated with the development of obsessive-compulsive disorder, whose causes and mechanisms are among the least understood among mental illnesses.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Psychological Science
Having a sense of purpose may add years to your life
Feeling that you have a sense of purpose in life may help you live longer, no matter what your age, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research has clear implications for promoting positive aging and adult development, says lead researcher Patrick Hill of Carleton University in Canada.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bullying may have long-term health consequences
Bullied children may experience chronic, systemic inflammation that persists into adulthood, while bullies may actually reap health benefits of increasing their social status through bullying, according to researchers at Duke Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, William T. Grant Foundation, Economic and Social Research Council

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 8-May-2014
International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing
Listening to bipolar disorder: Smartphone app detects mood swings via voice analysis
A smartphone app that monitors subtle qualities of a person's voice during everyday phone conversations shows promise for detecting early signs of mood changes in people with bipolar disorder, a University of Michigan team reports. While the app still needs much testing before widespread use, early results from a small group of patients show its potential to monitor moods while protecting privacy.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 7-May-2014
Obstetrics & Gynecology
New care approach eases depression among women
Women who received collaborative care for depression at an obstetrics and gynecology clinic showed fewer symptoms after treatment than women receiving usual depression care in the same setting, University of Washington research found. In this model, the patient's physician, a mental health professional, and a depression manager work together with the patient. The collaborative approach comprises counseling, greater patient engagement, and more frequent followup than is typical of mental health care at specialty clinics.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: McKenna Princing
mckennap@uw.edu
206-221-9394
University of Washington

Showing releases 51-75 out of 163.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

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