NIH Director Page NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIH Social Media and Outreach
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Videos
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 166.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Behavioral Sciences and the Law
Nearly 1 in 10 adults have impulsive anger issues and access to guns
An estimated 9 percent of adults in the US have a history of impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns, according to a study published this month in Behavioral Sciences and the Law. The study also found that an estimated 1.5 percent of adults report impulsive anger and carry firearms outside their homes.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, John W. Alden Trust, Elizabeth K. Dollard Trust

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 2-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Deconstructing brain systems involved in memory and spatial skills
In work that reconciles two competing views of brain structures involved in memory and spatial perception, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have conducted experiments that suggest the hippocampus -- a small region in the brain's limbic system -- is dedicated largely to memory formation and not to spatial skills, such as navigation. The study is published in this week's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
US Department of Veterans Affairs, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Christina Johnson
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-Apr-2015
Scientists win $3.3 million grant to speed development of treatments for autism, epilepsy
Scientists from the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute have been awarded $3.3 million by the National Institutes of Health to identify biomarkers to accelerate drug development for disorders including autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy and some types of intellectual disability.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Depression and Anxiety
Impact of domestic violence on women's mental health
In addition to their physical injuries, women who are victims of domestic violence are also at a greater risk of mental health problems such as depression and psychotic symptoms.
United Kingdom Medical Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, NIh/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: William Raillant-Clark
w.raillant-clark@umontreal.ca
514-343-7593
University of Montreal

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Science
Intergenerational transmission of abuse and neglect more complicated than previously believed
A study led by Cathy Spatz Widom, Distinguished Professor of Psychology at John Jay College, found that offspring of parents with histories of child abuse and neglect are themselves at risk for childhood neglect and sexual abuse but not physical abuse. Titled 'Intergenerational Transmission of Child Abuse and Neglect: Real or Detection Bias?' the study's findings were reported in the March 27 issue of the journal Science.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institute of Justice, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Contact: Doreen Vinas-Pineda
dvinas@jjay.cuny.edu
212-237-8645
John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
AIDS
For most children with HIV and low immune cell count, cells rebound after treatment
Most children with HIV who have low levels of a key immune cell eventually recover levels of this cell after they begin treatment.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/Office of AIDS Research, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Nature
Pitt team identifies mutations associated with development of congenital heart disease
Fetal ultrasound exams on more than 87,000 mice that were exposed to chemicals that can induce random gene mutations enabled developmental biologists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine to identify mutations associated with congenital heart disease in 61 genes, many not previously known to cause the disease. The study, published online today in Nature, indicates that the antenna-like cellular structures called cilia play a critical role in the development of these heart defects.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
JAMA Psychiatry
Prenatal exposure to common air pollutants linked to cognitive and behavioral impairment
Researchers have found a powerful relationship between prenatal PAH exposure and disturbances in parts of the brain that support information processing and behavioral control.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, US Environmental Protection Agency, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Debra Kain
dkain@chla.usc.edu
323-361-7628
Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Public Release: 25-Mar-2015
Nature
New autism-causing genetic variant identified
Using a novel approach that homes in on rare families severely affected by autism, a Johns Hopkins-led team of researchers has identified a new genetic cause of the disease. The rare genetic variant offers important insights into the root causes of autism, the researchers say. And, they suggest, their unconventional method can be used to identify other genetic causes of autism and other complex genetic conditions.
Simons Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Autism Speaks Dennis Weatherstone Predoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
American Journal of Public Health
Fewer multiple births could reduce autism risk in ART children
Scientists report that the incidence of diagnosed autism was twice as high for assisted reproductive technology (ART) as non-ART births among the nearly 6 million children in their study, born in California from 1997 through 2007. However, much of the association between ART and autism was explained by age and education of the mother as well as adverse perinatal outcomes, especially multiple births.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Eric Sharfstein
es3106@columbia.edu
212-854-6164
Columbia University

Public Release: 18-Mar-2015
JAMA Psychiatry
Are antipsychotic drugs more dangerous to dementia patients than we think?
Drugs aimed at quelling the behavior problems of dementia patients may also hasten their deaths more than previously realized, a new study finds. The research adds more troubling evidence to the case against antipsychotic drugs as a treatment for the delusions, hallucinations, agitation and aggression that many people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias experience.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Kara Gavin
kegavin@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Public Release: 16-Mar-2015
BMC Psychiatry
Risk patterns identified that make people more vulnerable to PTSD
Researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center have built a new computational tool that identifies 800 different ways people are at increased risk for post-traumatic stress disorder, permitting for the first time a personalized prediction guide.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Mandler
jim.mandler@nyumc.org
212-404-3525
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Women's Health Issues
Could yoga lessen prenatal depression?
A community-based prenatal yoga program may be an acceptable, safe, and effective intervention to reduce the symptoms of depression among pregnant women, according to initial results from a small pilot study. The results suggest that further research is warranted, the authors said.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
NYU scientists develop computer model explaining how brain learns to categorize
NYU researchers have devised a computer model to explain how a neural circuit learns to classify sensory stimuli into discrete categories, such as 'car vs. motorcycle.' Their findings shed new light on the brain processes underpinning judgments we make on a daily basis.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, The Swartz Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 10-Mar-2015
Molecular Psychiatry
Gene networks for innate immunity linked to PTSD risk
Researchers at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in New York and the United Kingdom, have identified genetic markers, derived from blood samples that are linked to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The markers are associated with gene networks that regulate innate immune function and interferon signaling.
Naval Medical Research Center, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Gerber Foundation, Sidney R. Baer, Jr. Foundation, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 9-Mar-2015
JAMA Psychiatry
Mood, anxiety disorders common in Tourette patients, emerge at a young age
A new study of Tourette syndrome led by researchers from UC San Francisco and Massachusetts General Hospital has found that nearly 86 percent of patients who seek treatment for TS will be diagnosed with a second psychiatric disorder during their lifetimes, and that nearly 58 percent will receive two or more such diagnoses.
Tourette Syndrome Association, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, TSA Research Fellowship, Duke Clinical Research Fellowship

Contact: Pete Farley
peter.farley@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Neuron
Abnormal brain rhythms tied to problems with thinking in schizophrenia
By studying specially bred mice with specific developmental and cognitive traits resembling those seen in schizophrenia, UC San Francisco researchers have provided new evidence that abnormal rhythmic activity in particular brain cells contributes to problems with learning, attention, and decision-making in individuals with that disorder.
Staglin Family, International Mental Health Research Organization, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation

Contact: Pete Farley
peter.farley@ucsf.edu
415-502-6397
University of California - San Francisco

Public Release: 5-Mar-2015
Cell
In vivo CRISPR-Cas9 screen sheds light on cancer metastasis and tumor evolution
For the first time, CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology has been employed in a whole organism model to systematically target every gene in the genome. A team of scientists have pioneered the use of this technology to 'knock out,' or turn off, all genes across the genome systematically in an animal model of cancer, revealing genes involved in tumor evolution and metastasis and paving the way for similar studies in other cell types and diseases.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Paul Goldsmith
paulg@broadinstitute.org
617-714-8600
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Journal of Medical Internet Research
Twitter helps smokers kick the habit, UCI-Stanford study finds
When subjects in a smoking cessation program tweet each other regularly, they're more successful at kicking the habit, according to a study by UC Irvine and Stanford University researchers. Specifically, daily 'automessages' that encourage and direct the social media exchanges may be more effective than traditional social media interventions for quitting smoking.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Anne Warde
awarde@uci.edu
949-824-7922
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Psychiatric Services
Despite federal law, some insurance exchange plans offer unequal mental health coverage
One-quarter of the health plans being sold on health insurance exchanges set up through the Affordable Care Act offer benefits that appear to violate a federal law requiring equal benefits for general medical and mental health care, according to new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Nature Genetics
Genetically speaking, mammals are more like their fathers
You might resemble or act more like your mother, but a novel research study from UNC School of Medicine researchers reveals that mammals are genetically more like their dads. Specifically, the research shows that although we inherit equal amounts of genetic mutations from our parents -- the mutations that make us who we are and not some other person -- we actually 'use' more of the DNA that we inherit from our dads.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unch.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Brain waves
Researchers have identified a group of neurons in the basal forebrain that help synchronize activity in the cortex, triggering brain waves that are characteristic of consciousness, perception and attention.
US Department of Veterans Affairs, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Global Frontier Grant

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Neuroscience
How brain waves guide memory formation
MIT researchers found that two brain regions that are key to learning -- the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex -- use two different brain-wave frequencies to communicate as the brain learns to associate unrelated objects.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, The Picower Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 19-Feb-2015
Molecular Autism
Growth hormone improves social impairments in those with autism-linked disorder
A growth hormone can significantly improve the social impairment associated with autism spectrum disorder in patients with a related genetic syndrome.
Beatrice and Samuel A. Seaver Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Elizabeth Dowling
edowling@chpnet.org
212-523-4047
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
High-powered X-ray laser unlocks mechanics of pain relief without addiction
Scientists have solved the structure of a bifunctional peptide bound to a neuroreceptor that offers pain relief without addiction.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, and others

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Showing releases 51-75 out of 166.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2015 by AAAS, the science society.