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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 151.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Clinical Infectious Diseases
HIV-infected adults diagnosed with age-related diseases at similar ages as uninfected
New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that HIV-infected adults are at a higher risk for developing heart attacks, kidney failure and cancer. But, contrary to what many had believed, the researchers say these illnesses are occurring at similar ages as adults who are not infected with HIV.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, and more

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Cell Reports
The brain's 'inner GPS' gets dismantled
Imagine being able to recognize your car as your own but never being able to remember where you parked it. Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have induced this all-too-common human experience -- or a close version of it -- permanently in rats and from what is observed perhaps derive clues about why strokes and Alzheimer's disease can destroy a person's sense of direction.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Veterans Affairs

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Personal Relationships
Is your relationship moving toward marriage? If it isn't, you probably can't admit it
Dating couples who have moved toward marriage over the course of their relationship remember accurately what was going on at each stage of their deepening commitment. But couples whose commitment to each other has stagnated or regressed are far less accurate in their memories of their relationships, says a new University of Illinois study.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Phyllis Picklesimer
p-pickle@illinois.edu
217-244-2827
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Statins reverse learning disabilities caused by genetic disorder
UCLA neuroscientists discovered that statins, a popular class of cholesterol drugs, reverse the learning deficits caused by a mutation linked to a common genetic cause of learning disabilities. Published in the Nov. 10 advance online edition of Nature Neuroscience, the findings were studied in mice genetically engineered to develop the disease, called Noonan syndrome.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Elaine Schmidt
eschmidt@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2272
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
JAMA Pediatrics
Overall risk of birth defects appears low for women taking antiretrovirals during early pregnancy
Among pregnant women infected with HIV, the use of antiretroviral medications early in pregnancy to treat their HIV or to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV does not appear to increase the risk of birth defects in their infants, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development,NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, and others

Contact: Marge Dwyer
mhdwyer@hsph.harvard.edu
617-432-8416
Harvard School of Public Health

Public Release: 4-Nov-2014
Journal of Vocational Behavior
Future family and career goals evident in teenage years
Career and family, often seen as competing parts of life, can actually complement each other, and when young people's goals for the future encompass family and career, the outcome is more likely to be success in both arenas, according to Penn State researchers.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 3-Nov-2014
Environmental influences on autism the focus of new $1.6 million federal grant to U-M
University of Michigan researchers will use a new $1.6 million federal grant to probe potential social and environmental links to autism, collecting location-specific information from tens of thousands of affected individuals and their families nationwide.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Schizophrenia Research
EEG test to help understand and treat schizophrenia
Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have validated an EEG test to study and treat schizophrenia. The findings, published in two separate studies, offer a clinical test that could be used to help diagnose persons at risk for developing mental illness later in life, as well as an approach for measuring the efficacies of different treatment options.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, US Department of Veteran Affairs, and Veterans Medical Research Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Autism after high school: Making the transition
The National Institute of Mental Health has awarded a grant to University of Kentucky College of Education Professor Lisa Ruble and a team of co-investigators to find ways to help reduce or eliminate the disconnect from needed services that often occurs when students with autism complete school.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jenny Wells
jenny.wells@uky.edu
859-257-5343
University of Kentucky

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Cell
Study gives new view on how cells control what comes in and out
A new study reveals that a form of calmodulin long thought to be dormant actually opens ion channels wide. The finding is likely to bring new insight into disorders caused by faulty control of these channels, such as cardiac arrhythmias, epilepsy and Parkinson's disease, the researchers say.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Parkinson Society Canada

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
CHOP and Temple receive NIH grant to explore eradicating HIV from hiding places in the brain
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Temple University have received a joint $4.3 million, four-year grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to investigate new methods to eradicate HIV that lurks in brain cells despite conventional antiviral treatments. The research, in cell cultures and animals, aims to set the stage for subsequently testing the most promising approaches in human patients.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Medical Anthropology Quarterly
CWRU researcher finds training officers about mental illness benefits prison's safety
Case Western Reserve University mental health researcher Joseph Galanek spent a cumulative nine months in an Oregon maximum-security prison to learn first-hand how the prison manages inmates with mental illness. What he found, through 430 hours of prison observations and interviews, is that inmates were treated humanely and security was better managed when cell block officers were trained to identify symptoms of mental illness and how to respond to them.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Depression and Anxiety
Pre-enlistment mental disorders and suicidality among new US Army soldiers
Two new reports show that new soldiers and civilians do not differ in their probability of having at least one lifetime mental disorder but that some mental disorders are more common among new soldiers than civilians. In addition, the rates of pre-enlistment suicidality among new soldiers are comparable to matched civilians.
US Department of the Army, US Department of Health and Human Services, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Teens whose parents exert more psychological control have trouble with closeness, independence
A new longitudinal study has found that teens whose parents exerted psychological control over them at age 13 had problems establishing healthy friendships and romantic relationships both in adolescence and into adulthood. The study followed 184 ethnically and socioeconomically diverse teens from age 13 to 21. It found that giving in to 'peer pressure' was more common among teens whose parents used guilt, withdrawing love, fostering anxiety, or other psychologically manipulative tactics.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level
A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Marie Curie Outgoing Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Erin White
ewhite@northwestern.edu
847-491-4888
Northwestern University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
PLOS ONE
Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy
A new study conducted by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Tom Hughes
Tom.Hughes@unchealth.unc.edu
984-974-1151
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests
A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before may boost later learning.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Defense

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Stress-related inflammation may increase risk for depression
Preexisting differences in the sensitivity of a key part of each individual's immune system to stress confer a greater risk of developing stress-related depression or anxiety
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Johnson and Johnson International Mental Health Research Organization, Irma T. Hirschl/Monique Weill-Caulier Trust, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Brain and Behavior Research Organization

Contact: Elizabeth Dowling
newsmedia@mssm.edu
212-241-9200
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Clinical Psychological Science
Teenage girls are exposed to more stressors that increase depression risk
Adolescence is often a turbulent time, and it is marked by substantially increased rates of depressive symptoms, especially among girls. New research indicates that this gender difference may be the result of girls' greater exposure to stressful interpersonal events, making them more likely to ruminate, and contributing to their risk of depression. The findings are published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Working memory hinders learning in schizophrenia
Trouble with working memory makes a distinct contribution to the difficulty people with schizophrenia sometimes have in learning, according to a new study. The researchers employed a specially designed experiment and computational models to distinguish the roles of working memory and reinforcement learning.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
Annals of Internal Medicine
Effective treatments available for HIV patients not eligible for efavirenz regimens
A new national clinical trial found HIV drug regimens that do not include efavirenz are effective as first-line antiretroviral therapy. The finding is important for patients who are not eligible for treatment with efavirenz, including women considering becoming pregnant and patients with a history of severe psychiatric disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, AIDS Clinical Trials Group, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

Contact: Holly Korschun
hkorsch@emory.edu
404-727-3990
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Sense of invalidation uniquely risky for troubled teens
A study of 99 teens hospitalized out of concern about suicide risk found that a high perception of family invalidation -- or lack of acceptance -- predicted future suicide events among boys, and peer invalidation predicted future self harm, such as cutting, among the teens in general.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Psychiatric Services
Public feels more negative toward drug addicts than mentally ill
People are significantly more likely to have negative attitudes toward those suffering from drug addiction than those with mental illness, and don't support insurance, housing and employment policies that benefit those dependent on drugs, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.
American International Group, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, Indiana University

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhu.edu
410-955-7619
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
U-M, USC, Broad to study genetics of 2 mental health disorders
Researchers at the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Medical School and collaborators at two other institutions will undertake the largest whole genome sequencing study funded to date, as they seek to better understand bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Laurel Thomas Gnagey
ltgnagey@umich.edu
734-647-1841
University of Michigan

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Basic and Applied Social Psychology
How career dreams are born
A new study shows just what it takes to convince a person that she is qualified to achieve the career of her dreams.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Patrick Carroll
Carroll.279@osu.edu
419-995-8235
Ohio State University

Showing releases 51-75 out of 151.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

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