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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 158.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
Nature
New study identifies signs of autism in the first months of life
Researchers have identified signs of autism present in the first months of life. The researchers followed babies from birth until 3 years of age, using eye-tracking technology, to measure the way infants look at and respond to social cues. Infants later diagnosed with autism showed declining attention to the eyes of other people, from the age of 2 months onwards.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Simons Foundation, Marcus Foundation, Whitehead Foundation

Contact: Carrie Edwards
carrie.edwards@choa.org
404-785-7253
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
JAMA
Interactive computer program helps patients talk with their physician about depression
Patients who used an interactive computer program about depression while waiting to see their primary-care doctor were nearly twice as likely to ask about the condition and significantly more likely to receive a recommendation for antidepressant drugs or a mental-health referral from their physician, according to a new study by researchers at UC Davis.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Charles Casey
charles.casey@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9048
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 5-Nov-2013
ISR Research Center for Group Dynamics Seminar Series on Violence and Aggression
Bad boys: Research predicts whether boys will grow out of it -- or not
Using the hi-tech tools of a new field called neurogenetics and a few simple questions for parents, a University of Michigan researcher is beginning to understand which boys are simply being boys and which may be headed for trouble.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Diane Swanbrow
swanbrow@umich.edu
734-647-9069
University of Michigan

Public Release: 4-Nov-2013
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Teens in child welfare system show higher drug abuse rate
Teenagers in the child welfare system are at higher-than-average risk of abusing marijuana, inhalants and other drugs, according to a study in the Nov. issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. However, the study also shows that parental involvement matters.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact: Debra Kain
ddkain@ucsd.edu
619-543-6202
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs

Public Release: 1-Nov-2013
American Journal of Psychiatry
Bipolar and pregnant
New research offers one of the first in-depth views of how metabolism changes during pregnancy reduce the effect of a commonly used drug to treat bipolar disorder. The blood level of the drug decreased during pregnancy, resulting in worsening symptoms. The new findings can help physicians prevent bipolar manic and depressive episodes in their pregnant patients, which are risky for the health of the mother and her unborn child.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Marla Paul
marla-paul@northwestern.edu
312-503-8928
Northwestern University

Public Release: 31-Oct-2013
Science
Gene found to foster synapse formation in the brain
Researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have found that a gene already implicated in human speech disorders and epilepsy is also needed for vocalizations and synapse formation in mice. The finding, they say, adds to scientific understanding of how language develops, as well as the way synapses -- the connections among brain cells that enable us to think -- are formed. A description of their experiments appears in Science Express on Oct. 31.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 28-Oct-2013
JAMA Pediatrics
Nurturing may protect kids from brain changes linked to poverty
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine have identified changes in the brains of children growing up in poverty. Those changes can lead to lifelong problems like depression, learning difficulties and limitations in the ability to cope with stress. But the study showed that the extent of those changes was influenced strongly by whether parents were attentive and nurturing.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 23-Oct-2013
Anesthesiology
Neurotoxin effectively relieves bone cancer pain in dogs, Penn researchers find
By the time bone cancer is diagnosed in a pet dog, it is often too late to save the animal's life. Instead, the goal of treatment is to keep the dog as comfortable and free of pain as possible for as long as possible. A study by University of Pennsylvania veterinarians Dorothy Cimino Brown and Kimberly Agnello has demonstrated that a single spinal injection of a neurotoxin provided more relief from pain than the pain-relieving drugs that are typically used.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
American Journal of Public Health
Veterans who mismanage money four times more likely to become homeless
Military veterans who report having common financial problems, such as bouncing a check or going over their credit limit, are four times more likely to become homeless in the next year than veterans without such problems.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, US Department of Education

Contact: Tom Hughes
tahughes@unch.unc.edu
919-966-6047
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 22-Oct-2013
Journal of Attention Disorders
What a difference a grade makes
Children with attention problems that emerge in first grade show poorer school performance for years afterward, including scoring lower on fifth grade reading. The poor performance occurred even if the attention problems were fleeting and improved after first grade. By contrast, children who developed attention problems starting in second grade performed as well as their peers in later years.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, US Department of Education

Contact: Alison Jones
alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8504
Duke University

Public Release: 8-Oct-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Research uncovers new details about brain anatomy and language in young children
Researchers from Brown University and King's College London have uncovered new details about how brain anatomy influences language development in young kids. Using advanced MRI, they find that different parts of the brain appear to be important for language development at different ages. Surprisingly, anatomy did not predict language very well between the ages of 2 and 4, when language ability increases quickly. That underscores the importance of environment during this critical period.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 7-Oct-2013
Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice
Abusive parenting may have a biological basis
Parents who physically abuse their children appear to have a physiological response that subsequently triggers more harsh parenting when they attempt parenting in warm, positive ways, according to new research.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Administration for Children and Families

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 3-Oct-2013
CHOP genetics expert co-leads NIH grant on psychiatric illness in patients with deletion syndrome
Genetics experts from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia are among the top leaders of a major international collaboration researching why patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have an elevated risk of schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. Discovering genes implicated in the deletion syndrome, a multisystem disorder, may offer important clues to the biological causes of mental illness in the general population.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: John Ascenzi
ascenzi@email.chop.edu
267-426-6055
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Public Release: 3-Oct-2013
Penn co-leads $12 M NIH grant to study genetics of mental illnesses in deletion syndrome patients
A major international consortium co-led by Penn Medicine has received a $12 million National Institute of Mental Health grant for a large-scale genetics study investigating why patients with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have an increased risk of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Steve Graff
stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5653
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
American Journal of Psychiatry
Smoking during pregnancy may increase risk of bipolar disorder in offspring
A study published today in the American Journal of Psychiatry suggests an association between smoking during pregnancy and increased risk for developing bipolar disorder in adult children. Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the New York State Psychiatric Institute evaluated offspring from a large cohort of pregnant women and found that maternal smoking during pregnancy was associated with a twofold increased risk of bipolar disorder in their offspring.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Stephanie Berger
sb2247@columbia.edu
212-305-4372
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 1-Oct-2013
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Clinician observations of preschoolers' behavior help to predict ADHD at school age
Don't rely on one source of information about your preschoolers' inattention or hyperactivity. Rather, consider how your child behaves at home as well as information from his or her teacher and a clinician. This advice is found in Springer's Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. A study there examines how well parent, teacher, and clinician ratings of preschoolers' behavior are able to predict severity and diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder at age six.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 30-Sep-2013
Pediatrics
Psychotropic medication use, including stimulants, in young children leveling off
The use of psychotropic prescription medications to treat ADHD, mood disorders, anxiety and other mental health disorders in very young children appears to have leveled off.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Feuer
jim.feuer@cchmc.org
513-636-4656
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 26-Sep-2013
Cell Reports
Made to order at the synapse: Dynamics of protein synthesis at neuron tip
Protein synthesis in nerve cell dendrites underlies long-term memory formation in the brain, among other functions. Knowing how proteins are made to order at the synapse can help researchers better understand how memories are made. RNA translation is dictated by translational hotspots, where translation is occurring in a ribosome at any one time in a discrete spot.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Ellison Foundation, National Alliance for Research in Schizophrenia and Affective Disorders, Swedish Research Council

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 24-Sep-2013
Journal of Abnormal Psychology
Past weight loss an overlooked factor in disordered eating
The focus of eating disorder research has largely been on the state of patients' thoughts, beliefs and emotions, with historically little focus on how current and past body weights contribute. A flurry of studies, the most recent published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, suggest that past body weight and relative weight loss should be taken into account.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 23-Sep-2013
Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences
Hunger pains
Binge-eating disorder, only recently designated as a diagnosis by the American Psychiatric Association in its official diagnostic manual of mental conditions, is associated with lifelong impairments comparable to those of bulimia nervosa, a long-established eating disorder with more dramatic symptoms.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Mental Health Burden Study, Shire Pharmaceuticals

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 13-Sep-2013
Journal of Neuroscience
Pinpointing molecular path that makes antidepressants act quicker in mouse model
The reasons behind why it often takes people several weeks to feel the effect of newly prescribed antidepressants remains somewhat of a mystery -- and likely, a frustration to both patients and physicians. How an antidepressant works on the biochemistry and behavior in mice lets researchers tease out the relative influence of two brain proteins on the pharmacology of an antidepressant. They found increased nerve-cell generation in the hippocampus and a quicker response to the antidepressant.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Cooperative Drug Discovery Group for the Treatment of Mood Disorders

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 11-Sep-2013
Neurology
Fat marker predicts cognitive decline in people with HIV
Johns Hopkins scientists have found that levels of certain fats found in cerebral spinal fluid can predict which patients with HIV are more likely to become intellectually impaired.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 5-Sep-2013
Annals of Internal Medicine
Social media + behavior psychology leads to HIV testing, better health behaviors
A new UCLA study demonstrates that an approach that combines behavioral science with social media and online communities can lead to increased AIDS testing and improved health behaviors among men at risk of HIV infection. The approach is also applicable across a variety of diseases.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, and others

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 4-Sep-2013
Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Young adults on the autism spectrum face tough prospects for jobs and independent living
For young adults with autism spectrum disorders, making the transition from school to the first rites of independent adult life, including a first job and a home away from home, can be particularly challenging. Two new reports on a large, nationally representative sample show outcomes in employment and residential status are worse for young adults with ASDs than for those with other disabilities.
Autism Speaks, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Emch Foundation

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 4-Sep-2013
Frontiers in Psychology
Ability to delay gratification may be linked to social trust, new CU-Boulder study finds
A person's ability to delay gratification -- forgoing a smaller reward now for a larger reward in the future -- may depend on how trustworthy the person perceives the reward-giver to be, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Yuko Munakata
Munakata@colorado.edu
303-735-5499
University of Colorado at Boulder

Showing releases 76-100 out of 158.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

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