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Department of Health and Human Services

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Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 162.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 17-Feb-2015
Nature Structural & Molecular Biology
High-powered X-ray laser unlocks mechanics of pain relief without addiction
Scientists have solved the structure of a bifunctional peptide bound to a neuroreceptor that offers pain relief without addiction.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, and others

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 4-Feb-2015
Cognition
Pigeon power
A new University of Iowa study finds pigeons can categorize 128 photographs into 16 categories of natural and manmade objects, a skill researchers say is similar to the mechanism children use to learn words.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Eye Institute, NIH/National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Sara Agnew
sara-agnew@uiowa.edu
319-384-0073
University of Iowa

Public Release: 4-Feb-2015
Neuropsychopharmacology
Researchers identify peptide that reduces urge to eat
Researchers have identified a peptide and hormone that when administered to a specific area of the brain may reduce the desire for food. The study, which appears in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, may one day lead to medications that treat obesity and binge eating disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Peter Paul Career Development Professorship, Peter McManus Charitable Trust, Boston University

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Feb-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Final results of the HIV prevention study VOICE are published in NEJM
Researchers who conducted the VOICE study involving more than 5,000 women in Africa detail in the NEJM how none of the products (tenofovir, Truvada and tenofovir vaginal gel) was effective in preventing HIV and the extent that women did not use them. Tests of blood indicate nonuse began early; many women never used the products. Yet, among women in the tenofovir gel group whose blood tests indicated use, HIV risk was reduced by 66 percent.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver Institute for Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Lisa Rossi
rossil@upmc.edu
Microbicide Trials Network

Public Release: 3-Feb-2015
Journal of Neuroscience
Researchers identify key mechanisms underlying HIV-associated cognitive disorders
New findings, published today by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, open the door to the development of new therapies to block or decrease cognitive decline due to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, estimated to affect 10 to 50 percent of aging HIV sufferers to some degree.
NIH/National Institute of Aging, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Bonnie Ward
bjward@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-Feb-2015
Nature Neuroscience
Scientists view effect of whisker tickling on mouse brains
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University have succeeded in peering into the brains of live mice with such precision that they were able to see how the position of specific proteins changed as memories were forged. The technique has broad applications for future studies on learning and on what goes wrong in disorders like autism, Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Catherine Kolf
ckolf@jhmi.edu
443-287-2251
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
MRIs link impaired brain activity to inability to regulate emotions in autism
Researchers from the UNC School of Medicine have found that -- when it comes to the ability to regulate emotions - brain activity in autistic people is significantly different than is brain activity in people without autism. Using fMRI, the researchers showed that symptoms including tantrums, irritability, anxiety, and depression seem to have a biological, mechanistic basis.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, UNC-CH Graduate School Dissertation Completion Fellowship, Clinical Translational Core of the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabibilities

Contact: Mark Derewicz
mark.derewicz@unchealth.unc.edu
919-923-0959
University of North Carolina Health Care

Public Release: 26-Jan-2015
Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Brain study sheds light on how children with autism process social play
Brain scans confirm significant differences in play behavior, brain activation patterns and stress levels in children with autism spectrum disorder as compared with typically developing children.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jennifer Wetzel
Jennifer.wetzel@vanderbilt.edu
615-322-4747
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
$3.9 million project will identify, treat Washington state toddlers at risk for autism
A $3.9 million, five-year project in Washington state will identify and treat toddlers with autism in the critical years before age 3 -- when specialized services can greatly improve their skills and behavior.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Deborah Bach
bach2@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 21-Jan-2015
Nature
NYU researchers reveal how the mundane can be meaningful -- and remembered
It's not surprising that our memories of highly emotional events are quite strong. But can these events change our memories of the past? New York University researchers report that emotional learning can lead to the strengthening of older memories.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 19-Jan-2015
Journal of Family Psychology
Early parental program improves long-term childhood outcomes
Children whose parents participated in a prenatal program aimed at enhancing couples' co-parenting relationship were better adjusted at age seven than children whose parents were assigned to a control group, according to Penn State researchers.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Victoria M. Indivero
vmi1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 15-Jan-2015
Journal of Pediatrics
Difficult behavior in young children may point to later problems
It's normal for a very young child to have tantrums and be otherwise disruptive, but researchers have found that if such behavior is prolonged or especially intense, the child may have conduct disorder. A Washington University team, led by senior investigator Joan L. Luby, MD, recommends that children who exhibit these symptoms be referred to mental health professionals for evaluation and possible intervention.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Dryden
jdryden@wustl.edu
314-286-0110
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Paradox revealed: Cues associated with infant abuse may help reduce stress in adult brain
Neurobiologists at New York University Langone Medical Center and elsewhere found a surprising and paradoxical effect of abuse-related cues in rat pups: those cues also can lower depressive-like behavior when the rat pups are fully grown. These properties may help shed light on why certain cues associated with early life abuse can sometimes reduce stress in those same individuals as adults.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Molecular Pharmacology
Scientists develop novel platform for treatment of breast, pancreatic cancer
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a novel synthetic compound that sharply inhibits the activity of a protein that plays an important role in in the progression of breast and pancreatic cancers.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
eLife
Link between stress and infertility can be broken
Researchers from the University of California Berkeley have identified the hormone linking stress to infertility and miscarriage. Silencing the hormone restores mating and pregnancy success to normal. The findings in rats could be applicable to humans and to endangered species whose survival depends on captive breeding and they offer a new target for further research.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Foundation for the National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jennifer Mitchell
j.mitchell@elifesciences.org
eLife

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
eLife
Blocking hormone could eliminate stress-induced infertility
Stress is known to interfere with reproduction, but a new study by UC Berkeley scientists shows that the effects of chronic stress on fertility persist long after the stress is gone. This is because a hormone that suppresses fertility, GnIH, remains high even after stress hormone levels return to normal. In rats, they successfully blocked the hormone gene and restored normal reproductive behavior, suggesting therapeutic potential for stressed humans and animals in captive breeding programs.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
People watching: Different brain pathways responsible for person, movement recognition
Researchers from University College London, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of California, San Diego have found that the ability to understand different movements, such as walking, skipping and jumping, engages different brain mechanisms from those that recognize who is initiating the action. Published in the Jan. 12 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study illustrates for the first time how individuals with prosopagnosia, or face blindness, are still able to recognize other people's movements.
The Royal Society, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Wellcome Trust, Marie-Curie

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Neuron
Brain scientists figure out how a protein crucial to learning and memory works
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have found out how a protein crucial to learning works: by removing a biochemical 'clamp' that prevents connections between nerve cells in the brain from growing stronger. The finding moves neuroscientists a step closer to figuring out how learning and memory work, and how problems with them can arise. A report on the discovery appears Jan. 7 in the journal Neuron.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Research Grant Council of Hong Kong, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management
Children's vulnerability reflected in genes
Some children are more sensitive to their environments, for better and for worse. Now Duke University researchers have identified a gene variant that may serve as a marker for these children, who are among society's most vulnerable. The study found that children from high-risk backgrounds who carried a common gene variant were very likely to develop serious problems as adults, but were also more responsive to treatment.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Insitute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Department of Educat

Contact: Alison Jones
Alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8052
Duke University

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Molecular Psychiatry
New picture, new insight
Using a different type of MRI imaging, researchers at the University of Iowa have discovered previously unrecognized differences in the brains of patients with bipolar disorder. In particular, the study, published Jan. 6 in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, revealed differences in the white matter of patients' brains and in the cerebellum, an area of the brain not previously linked with the disorder.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, US Department of Veterans Affairs, NARSAD

Contact: Jennifer Brown
jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu
319-356-7124
University of Iowa Health Care

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
Cell Reports
Imaging linking cell activity and behavior shows what it means for mice to have sex in mind
An automated method (much more sensitive than fMRI) to detect the activity of neurons during specific behaviors, at the resolution of individual brain cells throughout the entire mouse brain, has been successfully demonstrated. A team shows brain activation patterns when male mice perform two critical tasks: recognizing other individuals and determining the sex of another individual.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Simons Foundation for Autism Research, Allen Institute for Brain Science, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Gatsby Charitable Foundation

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Dec-2014
Clinical Intervensions in Aging
Patient self-reporting version of 'blood pressure cuff' for dementia is reliable and valid
Patient self-reporting version of the Healthy Aging Brain Care Monitor -- a primary-care tool to measure cognitive, functional and psychological symptoms -- is user-friendly, reliable and valid, including being sensitive to symptom change, according to new Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University Center for Aging Research study.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Could playing Tchaikovsky's 'Nutcracker' and other music improve kids' brains?
In a study called 'the largest investigation of the association between playing a musical instrument and brain development,' Medicine Vermont child psychiatry team has found that musical training might also help kids focus their attention, control their emotions and diminish their anxiety.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Contact: Jennifer Nachbur
jennifer.nachbur@uvm.edu
802-338-8316
University of Vermont

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Neuropsychopharmacology
Early exposure to antidepressants affects adult anxiety and serotonin transmission
Now, a UCLA team has studied early developmental exposure to two different antidepressants, Prozac and Lexapro, in a mouse model that mimics human third trimester medication exposure. They found that, although these serotonin-selective reuptake inhibiting antidepressants were thought to work the same way, they did not produce the same long-term changes in anxiety behavior in the adult mice.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, Shirley and Stefan Hatos Foundation, UCLA Weil Endowment Fund

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Child Development
Early caregiving experiences have long-term effects on social relationships, achievement
A new study has found that sensitive caregiving in the first three years of life predicts an individual's social competence and academic achievement, not only during childhood and adolescence, but into adulthood. The study used information from 243 individuals who were born into poverty, came from a range of racial/ethnic backgrounds, and had been followed from birth to age 32 as part of the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Risk and Adaption.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, University of Minnesota

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Showing releases 76-100 out of 162.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

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