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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 157.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 24-Mar-2014
Pediatrics
Integrating mental health services in pediatric practices feasible, effective, Pitt finds
Brief behavioral and mental health programs for children can be effectively provided within pediatric practices as an alternative to being referred to a community specialist, University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences researchers found in a National Institutes of Health-funded randomized trial.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Allison Hydzik
hydzikam@upmc.edu
412-647-9975
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 20-Mar-2014
Psychiatric Services
Lifestyle interventions can prevent major depression in adults with mild symptoms
Discussions with a dietary coach to learn about healthy eating were as effective as meeting with a counselor for problem-solving or 'talk' therapy in preventing major depression among older black and white adults with mild symptoms of the mood disorder, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Maryland. Their findings were published online recently in Psychiatric Services.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Endowment in Geriatric Psychiatry, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

Contact: Anita Srikameswaran
SrikamAV@upmc.edu
412-578-9193
University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

Public Release: 14-Mar-2014
PLOS ONE
Contagious yawning may not be linked to empathy; still largely unexplained
While previous studies have suggested a connection between contagious yawning and empathy, new research from the Duke Center for Human Genome Variation finds that contagious yawning may decrease with age and is not strongly related to variables like empathy, tiredness and energy levels.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Ellison Medical Foundation

Contact: Rachel Harrison
rachel.harrison@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Mar-2014
Child Development
Iron deficiency important to assess in children adopted from institutional settings
A new longitudinal study finds that children who spent more time in institutional settings (like orphanages) prior to adoption, and had more severe iron deficiency at the time of adoption, were more likely to have lower IQs and poorer higher-order thinking skills a year later. The study -- which followed children adopted into US families from Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Asia -- suggests that iron supplements and cognitive interventions could be helpful in counteracting these effects.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 5-Mar-2014
Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Atypical development in the siblings of children with autism is detectable at 12 months
Atypical development can be detected as early as 12 months of age among the siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder, a study published by researchers with the University of California Davis MIND Institute and University of California Los Angeles has found.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Phyllis Brown
phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9023
University of California - Davis Health System

Public Release: 5-Mar-2014
Neuron
Similarity breeds proximity in memory, NYU researchers find
Researchers at New York University have identified the nature of brain activity that allows us to bridge time in our memories. Their findings offer new insights into the temporal nature of how we store our recollections and may offer a pathway for addressing memory-related afflictions.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 4-Mar-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Suicidal ideation among US soldiers begins before enlistment
A major new study found that a majority (58.2 percent) of soldiers who had ever thought of suicide had these thoughts before enlistment, 76.6 percent of US Army soldiers with current mental disorders had onsets of the disorders before enlistment, and nearly half (47 percent) of soldiers who had ever made a suicide attempt did so for the first time before enlistment.
Army STARRS, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 4-Mar-2014
British Medical Journal
Does palliative chemotherapy palliate?
Terminal cancer patients who receive chemotherapy in the last months of their lives are less likely to die where they want and are more likely to undergo invasive medical procedures than those who do not receive chemotherapy, according to research in this week's BMJ.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jennifer Gundersen
jeg2034@med.cornell.edu
646-317-7402
Weill Cornell Medical College

Public Release: 27-Feb-2014
Cell
Internal logic: 8 distinct subnetworks in mouse cerebral cortex
The mammalian cerebral cortex, long thought to be a dense single interrelated tangle of neural networks, actually has a 'logical' underlying organizational principle. Researchers have identified eight distinct neural subnetworks that together form the connectivity infrastructure of the mammalian cortex, the part of the brain involved in higher-order functions such as cognition, emotion and consciousness.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Suzanne Wu
suzanne.wu@usc.edu
213-740-0252
University of Southern California

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Mental health conditions in most suicide victims left undiagnosed at doctor visits
The mental health conditions of most people who commit suicide remain undiagnosed, even though many visit a primary care provider or medical specialist in the year before they die, according to a national study. Among those in the study, 83 percent received health care treatment in the year prior to dying, and they used medical and primary care services more frequently than any other health service. However, a mental health diagnosis was made in less than half (45 percent) of these cases.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Dwight Angell
dwight.angell@hfhs.org
313-850-3471
Henry Ford Health System

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Journal of General Internal Medicine
Preventing suicide should start in a general medical setting
The mental health conditions of most people who commit suicide remain undiagnosed, even though most visit a primary care provider or medical specialist in the year before they die. To help prevent suicides, health care providers should therefore become more attuned to their patients' mental health states and possible suicide ideations. These are the findings of Brian Ahmedani from the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, Michigan.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Alexander Brown
alexander.brown@springer.com
917-710-8274
Springer Science+Business Media

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Journal of Affective Disorders
Higher risks among perinatal women with bipolar disorder
Women with bipolar disorder often struggle with the illness during and after pregnancy. A new study finds that they were significantly more likely to face important psychiatric and childrearing challenges compared to women who were seeking treatment for other psychiatric disorders.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 24-Feb-2014
Diabetes Care
Specialized cognitive therapy improves blood sugar control in depressed diabetes patients
A program of cognitive behavioral therapy that addresses both mood and diabetes self-care led to improved blood sugar control and produced faster relief of depression in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kristen Chadwick
kschadwick@partners.org
617-643-3907
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 23-Feb-2014
Nature
Researchers pinpoint brain region essential for social memory
Researchers have determined that a small region of the hippocampus known as CA2 is essential for social memory, the ability of an animal to recognize another of the same species. A better grasp of the function of CA2 could prove useful in understanding and treating disorders characterized by altered social behaviors, such as autism, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. The findings, made in mice, were published today in the online edition of Nature.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Joannie Danielides
jcd2185@columbia.edu
917-539-4924
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 20-Feb-2014
Biological Psychiatry
Study in mice raises question: Could PTSD involve immune response to stress?
Chronic stress that produces inflammation and anxiety in mice appears to prime their immune systems for a prolonged fight, causing the animals to have an excessive reaction to a single acute stressor weeks later, new research suggests.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Jonathan Godbout
Jonathan.Godbout@osumc.edu
614-293-3456
Ohio State University

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
JAMA
Antidepressant holds promise in treating Alzheimer's agitation
An antidepressant medication has shown potential in treating symptoms of agitation that occur with Alzheimer's disease and in alleviating caregivers' stress, according to a multi-site US-Canada study.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Kate Richards
media@camh.ca
416-595-6015
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
JAMA
JAMA study shows medication to treat agitation for Alzheimer's disease shows mixed results
The results of a JAMA study offer a glimmer of hope to families caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's disease. Researchers at the University of Rochester, Johns Hopkins University, and six other academic medical centers found that a high dose of a common antidepressant significantly reduced agitation in patients. However, given potentially concerning side effects of citalopram, researchers say further investigation is needed to determine whether a smaller dose will be as effective.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Julie Philipp
julie_philipp@urmc.rochester.edu
585-275-1309
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 18-Feb-2014
JAMA
Antidepressant holds promise in treating Alzheimer's agitation
The antidepressant drug citalopram, sold under the brand names Celexa and Cipramil and also available as a generic medication, significantly relieved agitation in a group of patients with Alzheimer's disease. In lower doses than those tested, the drug might be safer than antipsychotic drugs currently used to treat the condition, according to results of a clinical trial led by Johns Hopkins researchers that included seven other academic medical centers in the United States and Canada.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Stephanie Desmon
sdesmon1@jhmi.edu
410-955-8665
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 13-Feb-2014
Cell
Broad, MIT researchers reveal structure of key CRISPR complex
Researchers from the Broad Institute and MIT have teamed up with colleagues from the University of Tokyo to form the first high definition picture of the Cas9 complex -- a key part of the CRISPR-Cas system used by scientists as a genome-editing tool to silence genes and probe the biology of cells.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Haley Bridger
hbridger@broadinstitute.org
617-714-7968
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
New evidence shows how chronic stress predisposes brain to mental disorders
UC Berkeley biologist Daniela Kaufer and colleagues have shown in rats that chronic stress makes stem cells in the brain produce more myelin-producing cells and fewer neurons, possibly affecting the speed of connections between cells as well as memory and learning. This could explain why stress leads to mental illness, such as PTSD, anxiety and mood disorders, later in life.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Behavior Therapy
RI Hospital: Cognitive behavioral therapy benefits patients with body dysmorphic disorder
In a recent study, researchers at Rhode Island Hospital found significant benefits of cognitive behavioral therapy as a treatment modality for patients with Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). BDD is a common, often severe, and under-recognized body image disorder that affects an estimated 1.7 percent to 2.4 percent of the population. This study demonstrated significant improvement in patients' BDD symptoms and level of disability, as well as high levels of patient satisfaction with the treatment.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Ellen Slingsby
eslingsby@lifespan.org
401-444-6421
Lifespan

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Psychiatric Services
Personal experience, work seniority improve mental health professionals' outlook
One might think that after years of seeing people at their worst, mental health workers would harbor negative attitudes about mental illness, perhaps associating people with mental health issues as less competent or dangerous. But a new study suggests the opposite.
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Molly McElroy
mollywmc@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Psychiatry Research
Study finds high Rx burden for bipolar patients
Concerned about patients with bipolar disorder needing hospitalization despite treatment with four or more psychotropic medications, a team of researchers sought to quantify the rate of "complex polypharmacy." They found that 36 percent of patients admitted to the hospital with bipolar disorder in 2010 were receiving complex polypharmacy from their community providers The polypharmacy rate was significantly higher for women. Including for other conditions, the average patient was on six medications.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 4-Feb-2014
Health Psychology
Happy people, safer sex
In a new study, researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health report that HIV-positive men whose moods improved in a given week were more likely to have safe sex than they would in a normal week. In weeks where moods were worse than usual, they were more likely to have unprotected sex. Results appear online in the journal Health Psychology.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Timothy S. Paul
tp2111@columbia.edu
212-305-2676
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health

Public Release: 3-Feb-2014
Health Psychology
Perceived control reduces mortality risk at low, not high, education levels
Personality researchers find having a sense of control over one's life can reduce mortality rates in people who have little education, but a sense of control does not influence mortality rates in people with higher levels of education.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Julie Philipp
julie_philipp@urmc.rochester.edu
585-275-1309
University of Rochester Medical Center

Showing releases 76-100 out of 157.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

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