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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

Funded News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 166.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Paradox revealed: Cues associated with infant abuse may help reduce stress in adult brain
Neurobiologists at New York University Langone Medical Center and elsewhere found a surprising and paradoxical effect of abuse-related cues in rat pups: those cues also can lower depressive-like behavior when the rat pups are fully grown. These properties may help shed light on why certain cues associated with early life abuse can sometimes reduce stress in those same individuals as adults.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: David March
david.march@nyumc.org
212-404-3528
NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
Molecular Pharmacology
Scientists develop novel platform for treatment of breast, pancreatic cancer
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a novel synthetic compound that sharply inhibits the activity of a protein that plays an important role in in the progression of breast and pancreatic cancers.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
eLife
Link between stress and infertility can be broken
Researchers from the University of California Berkeley have identified the hormone linking stress to infertility and miscarriage. Silencing the hormone restores mating and pregnancy success to normal. The findings in rats could be applicable to humans and to endangered species whose survival depends on captive breeding and they offer a new target for further research.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Foundation for the National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jennifer Mitchell
j.mitchell@elifesciences.org
eLife

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
eLife
Blocking hormone could eliminate stress-induced infertility
Stress is known to interfere with reproduction, but a new study by UC Berkeley scientists shows that the effects of chronic stress on fertility persist long after the stress is gone. This is because a hormone that suppresses fertility, GnIH, remains high even after stress hormone levels return to normal. In rats, they successfully blocked the hormone gene and restored normal reproductive behavior, suggesting therapeutic potential for stressed humans and animals in captive breeding programs.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
People watching: Different brain pathways responsible for person, movement recognition
Researchers from University College London, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of California, San Diego have found that the ability to understand different movements, such as walking, skipping and jumping, engages different brain mechanisms from those that recognize who is initiating the action. Published in the Jan. 12 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study illustrates for the first time how individuals with prosopagnosia, or face blindness, are still able to recognize other people's movements.
The Royal Society, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Wellcome Trust, Marie-Curie

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Neuron
Brain scientists figure out how a protein crucial to learning and memory works
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have found out how a protein crucial to learning works: by removing a biochemical 'clamp' that prevents connections between nerve cells in the brain from growing stronger. The finding moves neuroscientists a step closer to figuring out how learning and memory work, and how problems with them can arise. A report on the discovery appears Jan. 7 in the journal Neuron.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Research Grant Council of Hong Kong, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management
Children's vulnerability reflected in genes
Some children are more sensitive to their environments, for better and for worse. Now Duke University researchers have identified a gene variant that may serve as a marker for these children, who are among society's most vulnerable. The study found that children from high-risk backgrounds who carried a common gene variant were very likely to develop serious problems as adults, but were also more responsive to treatment.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Insitute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Department of Educat

Contact: Alison Jones
Alison.jones@duke.edu
919-681-8052
Duke University

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
Molecular Psychiatry
New picture, new insight
Using a different type of MRI imaging, researchers at the University of Iowa have discovered previously unrecognized differences in the brains of patients with bipolar disorder. In particular, the study, published Jan. 6 in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, revealed differences in the white matter of patients' brains and in the cerebellum, an area of the brain not previously linked with the disorder.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, US Department of Veterans Affairs, NARSAD

Contact: Jennifer Brown
jennifer-l-brown@uiowa.edu
319-356-7124
University of Iowa Health Care

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
Cell Reports
Imaging linking cell activity and behavior shows what it means for mice to have sex in mind
An automated method (much more sensitive than fMRI) to detect the activity of neurons during specific behaviors, at the resolution of individual brain cells throughout the entire mouse brain, has been successfully demonstrated. A team shows brain activation patterns when male mice perform two critical tasks: recognizing other individuals and determining the sex of another individual.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Simons Foundation for Autism Research, Allen Institute for Brain Science, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Gatsby Charitable Foundation

Contact: Peter Tarr
tarr@cshl.edu
516-367-8455
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Public Release: 29-Dec-2014
Clinical Intervensions in Aging
Patient self-reporting version of 'blood pressure cuff' for dementia is reliable and valid
Patient self-reporting version of the Healthy Aging Brain Care Monitor -- a primary-care tool to measure cognitive, functional and psychological symptoms -- is user-friendly, reliable and valid, including being sensitive to symptom change, according to new Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University Center for Aging Research study.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Cindy Fox Aisen
caisen@iupui.edu
317-843-2276
Indiana University

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
Journal of American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Could playing Tchaikovsky's 'Nutcracker' and other music improve kids' brains?
In a study called 'the largest investigation of the association between playing a musical instrument and brain development,' Medicine Vermont child psychiatry team has found that musical training might also help kids focus their attention, control their emotions and diminish their anxiety.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Contact: Jennifer Nachbur
jennifer.nachbur@uvm.edu
802-338-8316
University of Vermont

Public Release: 19-Dec-2014
Neuropsychopharmacology
Early exposure to antidepressants affects adult anxiety and serotonin transmission
Now, a UCLA team has studied early developmental exposure to two different antidepressants, Prozac and Lexapro, in a mouse model that mimics human third trimester medication exposure. They found that, although these serotonin-selective reuptake inhibiting antidepressants were thought to work the same way, they did not produce the same long-term changes in anxiety behavior in the adult mice.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, Shirley and Stefan Hatos Foundation, UCLA Weil Endowment Fund

Contact: Kim Irwin
kirwin@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2262
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Child Development
Early caregiving experiences have long-term effects on social relationships, achievement
A new study has found that sensitive caregiving in the first three years of life predicts an individual's social competence and academic achievement, not only during childhood and adolescence, but into adulthood. The study used information from 243 individuals who were born into poverty, came from a range of racial/ethnic backgrounds, and had been followed from birth to age 32 as part of the Minnesota Longitudinal Study of Risk and Adaption.
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, University of Minnesota

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 18-Dec-2014
Child Development
The quality of parent-infant relationships and early childhood shyness predict teen anxiety
Social anxiety is one of the most common psychiatric disorders among children and adolescents. A new study has found that together, the quality of parent-infant relationships and early childhood shyness predict the likelihood of social anxiety in adolescence. In this longitudinal study, researchers studied 165 European-American, middle- to upper-middle-class adolescents who were recruited as infants.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
Health coaching paired with gym membership works best for obese people with mental illness
A health promotion program, called In SHAPE, designed for people with serious mental illness, produced more fit participants and significant weight loss than a control group where participants only received a gym membership. The results of a randomized clinical trial, published in the Dec. 12 American Journal of Psychiatry, Dr. Stephen Bartels of Dartmouth and colleagues showed that more than half the participants in the In SHAPE group achieved clinically significant reduction in cardiovascular risk.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Annmarie Christensen
Annmarie.Christensen@Dartmouth.edu
603-653-0897
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Lancet HIV
Combining social media and behavioral psychology could lead to more HIV testing
UCLA research suggests that social media such as Twitter and Facebook, combined with behavioral psychology, could be a valuable tool in the fight against AIDS by prompting high-risk individuals to be tested.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, UCLA AIDS Institute and Center for AIDS Research

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
International Journal of Eating Disorders
Season's eatings
Some women become preoccupied with their body weight and shape after changes in hormones drive increases in emotional eating, or the tendency to overconsume food in response to negative emotions. The recurring nature of monthly increases in weight concerns in menstruating women may increase the risk of developing an eating disorder.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Kim Ward
kim.ward@cabs.msu.edu
517-432-0117
Michigan State University

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Study links ADHD, conduct disorder with alcohol and tobacco use in young teens
A new study links attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder in young adolescents with increased alcohol and tobacco use. The Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center study is among the first to assess such an association in this age group.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jim Feuer
jim.feuer@cchmc.org
513-636-4656
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
NeuroImage
Brain study from UT Dallas uncovers new clues on how cues may affect memory
New research out of the University of Texas at Dallas shows that the brain activity prior to seeing an item is related to how well it is later remembered. Moreover, the researchers also found that the activity in different areas of the brain was unexpectedly related to how the information was remembered.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Ben Porter
ben.porter@utdallas.edu
972-883-2193
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 2-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Brain representations of social thoughts accurately predict autism diagnosis
Carnegie Mellon University researchers have created brain-reading techniques to use neural representations of social thoughts to predict autism diagnoses with 97 percent accuracy. This establishes the first biologically based diagnostic tool that measures a person's thoughts to detect the disorder that affects many children and adults worldwide.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
Two studies identify a detectable, pre-cancerous state in the blood
Researchers from the Broad Institute, Harvard Medical School, and Harvard-affiliated hospitals have uncovered an easily detectable, 'pre-malignant' state in the blood that significantly increases the likelihood that an individual will go on to develop blood cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma, or myelodysplastic syndrome. The discovery, which was made independently by two research teams affiliated with the Broad and partner institutions, opens new avenues for research aimed at early detection and prevention of blood cancer.
National Institutes of Health, Gabrielle's Angel Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Wellcome Trust, and others

Contact: Veronica Meade-Kelly
veronica@broadinstitute.org
617-714-7113
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
Research shows why antidepressant may be effective in postpartum depression
An antidepressant commonly prescribed for women with postpartum depression may restore connections between cells in brain regions that are negatively affected by chronic stress during pregnancy, new research suggests.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Benedetta Leuner
Leuner.1@osu.edu
614-292-5218
Ohio State University

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Pain from rejection and physical pain may not be so similar after all
Over the last decade, neuroscientists have largely come to believe that physical pain and social pain are processed by the brain in the same way. But a new study led by the University of Colorado shows that the two kinds of pain actually use distinct neural circuits, a finding that could lead to more targeted treatments and a better understanding of how the two kinds of pain interact.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Choong-Wan Woo
Choongwan.Woo@colorado.edu
720-443-3640
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 18-Nov-2014
Neuroscience 2014
High-fructose diet in adolescence may exacerbate depressive-like behavior
When animals consume a diet high in fructose throughout adolescence, it can worsen depressive- and anxiety-like behavior and alter how the brain responds to stress.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Neuropsychopharmacology
Study finds Alzheimer's drug may reduce the urge to binge eat
The Alzheimer's drug memantine may perform double-duty helping binge eaters control their compulsion. Researchers have demonstrated that memantine, a neuroprotective drug, may reduce the addictive and impulsive behavior associated with binge eating.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health Peter Paul Career Development Professorship, McManus Charitable Trust

Contact: Gina DiGravio
ginad@bu.edu
617-638-8480
Boston University Medical Center

Showing releases 76-100 out of 166.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 > >>

     
   

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