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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

NIH Research News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 90.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
JAMA Psychiatry
Boys more likely to have antipsychotics prescribed, regardless of age
Boys are more likely than girls to receive a prescription for antipsychotic medication regardless of age, researchers have found. Approximately 1.5 percent of boys ages 10-18 received an antipsychotic prescription in 2010, although the percentage falls by nearly half after age 19. Among antipsychotic users with mental disorder diagnoses, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder was the most common among youth ages 1-18, depression was the most common diagnosis among young adults ages 19-24 receiving antipsychotics.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Michaelle Scanlon
NIMHpress@mail.nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Pediatrics
Umbilical cord 'milking' improves blood flow in preterm infants
A technique to increase the flow of blood from the umbilical cord into the infant's circulatory system improves blood pressure and red blood cell levels in preterm infants delivered by cesarean section, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Meredith Daly or Robert Bock
dalym@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
NIDA announces new awards for early stage investigators
The National Institute on Drug Abuse today announced the first six recipients of its two newly developed Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS and genetics or epigenetics research.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: NIDA Press Office
Media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Cell
NIAID-funded HIV vaccine research generates key antibodies in animal models
A trio of studies being published today in the journals Science and Cell describes advances toward the development of an HIV vaccine. The three study teams all demonstrated techniques for stimulating animal cells to produce antibodies that either could stop HIV from infecting human cells in the laboratory or had the potential to evolve into such antibodies. Each of the research teams received funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Researchers design placenta-on-a-chip to better understand pregnancy
National Institutes of Health researchers and their colleagues have developed a 'placenta-on-a-chip' to study the inner workings of the human placenta and its role in pregnancy. The device was designed to imitate, on a micro-level, the structure and function of the placenta and model the transfer of nutrients from mother to fetus. This prototype is one of the latest in a series of organ-on-a-chip technologies developed to accelerate biomedical advances.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital Research Fund, National Research Foundation of Korea, National Medical Center & Asan Medical Center in South Korea

Contact: Katie Rush
katie.rush@nih.gov
301-496-9066
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
NIH-funded researchers identify new genetic immune disorder
NIH-funded researchers funded have identified a new immune disorder -- DOCK2 deficiency -- named after the mutated gene responsible for the disease. An international team of collaborators studied five children, four boys and one girl, from different ethnic backgrounds who had experienced debilitating infections early in life. The children were diagnosed with combined immunodeficiency, which refers to a group of inherited disorders distinguished by defects in immune system cells called T cells. CIDs also may affect other cells of the immune system, including B cells.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
linda.huynh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 17-Jun-2015
Study of Ebola survivors opens in Liberia
The Liberia-US clinical research partnership known as PREVAIL has launched a study of people in Liberia who have survived Ebola virus disease (EVD) within the past two years. The clinical trial investigators hope to better understand the long-term health consequences of EVD, determine if survivors develop immunity that will protect them from future Ebola infection, and assess whether previously EVD-infected individuals can transmit infection to close contacts and sexual partners.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Ministry of Health of Liberia

Contact: Jennifer Routh
Jennifer.routh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 16-Jun-2015
Annals of Internal Medicine
Panel urges innovative research to improve diagnosis and treatment of ME/CFS
An independent panel convened by the National Institutes of Health is calling for more research and more opportunities for new investigators to invigorate the field. The panel also recommended maintaining biological samples (e.g., serum, whole blood, RNA, DNA) in a repository to support studies on biomarker discovery. Additionally, the panel recommended providing education and training to health care providers about the diagnosis and treatment of ME/CFS.

Contact: Deborah Langer
langerdh@od.nih.gov
301-443-4569
NIH/Office of Disease Prevention

Public Release: 12-Jun-2015
American Journal of Public Health
Study may help Department of Veterans Affairs find patients with high risk of suicide
NIMH and VA scientists used VA health data to identify very small groups of patients with very high, predicted suicide risk -- most of the individuals had not been identified for suicide risk by clinicians. Such methods can help the VHA to target suicide prevention efforts for patients at high risk, and may have more wide-ranging benefits.
Department of Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Michaelle Scanlon
NIMHpress@mail.nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 9-Jun-2015
Emerging Infectious Diseases
West African Ebola virus strain less virulent than prototype 1976 strain
The Makona strain of Ebola virus circulating in West Africa for the past year takes roughly two days longer to cause terminal disease in an animal model compared to the original 1976 Mayinga strain isolated in Central Africa, according to a new NIH report. The new study suggests the current virus has a decreased ability to cause disease in their animal model compared to the 1976 strain.
NIH/ National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ken Pekoc
kpekoc@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 5-Jun-2015
Genome Research
A new role for zebrafish: Larger scale gene function studies
Scientists at the National Human Genome Research Institute are using a fairly new gene-editing technology known as CRISPR/Cas9 to target specific DNA sequences in zebrafish. This technique could dramatically accelerate the discovery of gene function and the identification of disease genes in humans.

Contact: Steven Benowitz
Steven.Benowitz@nih.gov
301-402-0911
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 4-Jun-2015
American Journal of Human Genetics
NIH researchers pilot predictive medicine by studying healthy people's DNA
NHGRI scientists have turned traditional genomics research on its head. Instead of trying to find a mutation in the genome of a person with a genetic disease, they sequenced the genomes of healthy participants, and then analyzed the data to find presumed mutations that would almost certainly lead to a genetic condition. Of nearly 1,000 volunteers whose genomes were examined, about 100 had variants predicting a rare disease. Almost half actually had the disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steven Benowitz
Steven.Benowitz@nih.gov
301-902-0911
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 29-May-2015
Nature Methods
A patient's budding cortex -- in a dish?
Scientists have perfected mini cultured 3-D structures that grow and function much like the outer mantle -- the key working tissue, or cortex -- of the brain of the person from whom they were derived. Strikingly, these 'organoids' buzz with neuronal network activity. Cells talk with each other in circuits, much as they do in our brains.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 28-May-2015
JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery
Nearly 1 in 7 Hispanic/Latino adults has some hearing loss
In the largest study to date of hearing loss among Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States, researchers have found that nearly 1 in 7 has hearing loss, a number similar to the general population prevalence. The analysis also looked at the differences between subgroups and found that Hispanics of Puerto Rican descent have the highest rate of hearing loss, while Mexican-Americans have the lowest.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: NIDCD Press Office
news@nidcd.nih.gov
301-496-7243
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Starting antiretroviral treatment early improves outcomes for HIV-infected individuals
A major international randomized clinical trial has found that HIV-infected individuals have a considerably lower risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses if they start taking antiretroviral drugs sooner, when their CD4+ T-cell count--a key measure of immune system health -- is higher, instead of waiting until the CD4+ cell count drops to lower levels.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Science
Scientists create mice with a major genetic cause of ALS and FTD
Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla., created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Mayo Clinic Foundation, Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine, Mayo Graduate School, ALS Association, Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins, Target ALS, and others

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 20-May-2015
Animals' presence may ease social anxiety in kids with autism
When animals are present, children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have lower readings on a device that detects anxiety and other forms of social arousal when interacting with their peers. According to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health, companion animals -- like dogs, cats or the guinea pigs in the study --may prove to be a helpful addition to treatment programs designed to help children with ASDs improve their social skills and interactions with other people.
National Institutes of Health; WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition

Contact: Robert Bock
bockr@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Immunity
New form of interleukin-2 could be fine-tuned to fight disease
Scientists are reporting development of a new way to modify interleukin-2 (IL-2), a substance known as a cytokine that plays key roles in regulating immune system responses, in order to fine-tune its actions. Harnessing the action of IL-2 in a controllable fashion is of clinical interest with potential benefit in a range of situations, including transplantation and autoimmune disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: NHLBI Engagement and Media Relations Branch
nhlbi_news@nhlbi.nih.gov
301-496-4236
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Nature Immunology
HIV reservoirs remain obstacles to cure
Antiretroviral therapy has proven lifesaving for people infected with HIV; however, the medications are a lifelong necessity for most HIV-infected individuals and present practical, logistical, economic and health-related challenges. A primary research goal is to find an HIV cure that either clears the virus from an infected person's body or enables HIV-infected individuals to suppress virus levels and replication to extremely low levels without the need for daily ART.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Robin Tricoles
robin.tricoles@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature Methods
Microchip captures clusters of circulating tumor cells -- NIH study
Researchers have developed a microfluidic chip that can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells, which could yield important new insights into how cancer spreads. The work was funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Margot Kern
nibibpress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3500
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Intel International Science and Engineering Fair
Pain reliever investigation wins top NIH Addiction Science Award
A project identifying novel compounds that could be used for pain relief was awarded a first place Addiction Science Award at the 2015 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair -- the world's largest science competition for high school students. The awards are coordinated by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health, and Friends of NIDA, a coalition that supports NIDA's mission.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Friends of NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: NIDA Press Office
Media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 13-May-2015
Neurology
A SMARTer approach to stroke care
Time is critical when it comes to stroke, and early treatment is associated with better outcomes. According to the Screening with MRI for Accurate and Rapid stroke Treatment (SMART) study, small changes in quality improvement procedures enabled clinicians to use MRI scans to diagnose stroke patients before giving acute treatment, within 60 minutes of hospital arrival. MRI scans provide detailed images but take longer to complete than CT scans, which are commonly used in most centers.

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Cell
Scientists unravel the mystery of the tubulin code
Driving down the highway, you encounter ever-changing signs -- speed limits, exits, food and gas options. Seeing these roadside markers may cause you to slow down, change lanes or start thinking about lunch. In a similar way, cellular structures called microtubules are tagged with a variety of chemical markers that can influence cell functions. The pattern of these markers makes up the 'tubulin code' and scientists have uncovered the mechanism behind one of the main writers of this code.

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Diabetes
Ease of weight loss influenced by individual biology
For the first time in a lab, researchers at the National Institutes of Health found evidence supporting the commonly held belief that people with certain physiologies lose less weight than others when limiting calories. Study results published May 11 in Diabetes.

Contact: Krysten Carrera
NIDDKMedia@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3583
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Public Release: 7-May-2015
Science
New GTEx findings show how DNA differences influence gene activity, disease susceptibility
Researchers funded by the NIH Genotype-Tissue Expression project have created a data resource to help establish how differences in individual genomic make-up can affect gene activity and contribute to disease. It will enable scientists to examine the genomics of different human tissues and cells. Investigators reported findings from a pilot study, providing insights into how genomic variants control when and how much genes are turned on and off in tissues, and predispose people to disease.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Healt, NIH/Common Fund

Contact: Steven Benowitz
steven.benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Showing releases 1-25 out of 90.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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