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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

NIH Research News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 84.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 30-Mar-2015
Advances in Neonatal Care
Promoting maternal interaction improves growth, weight gain in preemies
An intervention to teach mothers of preterm infants how to interact with their babies more effectively results in better weight gain and growth for the infants, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Bock
bockr@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
Ebola test vaccines appear safe in phase 2 Liberian clinical trial
Two experimental Ebola vaccines appear to be safe based on evaluation in more than 600 people in Liberia who participated in the first stage of the Partnership for Research on Ebola Vaccines in Liberia Phase 2/3 clinical trial, according to interim findings from an independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board review. Based on these findings, the study, which is sponsored by the NIAID, part of the National Institutes of Health, may now advance to Phase 3 testing.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jennifer Routh
Jennifer.routh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 26-Mar-2015
PloS Pathogens
HIV can spread early, evolve in patients' brains
HIV can genetically evolve and independently replicate in patients' brains early in the illness process, an analysis of cerebral spinal fluid has found. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with antiretroviral therapy should reduce the risk that the virus could find refuge and cause damage in the brain, where some medications are less effective -- potentially enabling it to re-emerge, even after it is suppressed in the periphery, say researchers.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 24-Mar-2015
Lancet Haematology
NIH researchers identify red blood cell traits associated with malaria risk in children
NIAID researchers have found that certain red blood cell traits in children can increase or decrease their risk for malaria.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Emily Mullin
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
Nature
Strengthening the immune system's fight against brain cancer
When cancer strikes, it may be possible for patients to fight back with their own defenses, using a strategy known as immunotherapy. According to a new study published in Nature, researchers have found a way to enhance the effects of this therapeutic approach in glioblastoma, a deadly type of brain cancer, and possibly improve patient outcomes. The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 19-Mar-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
NIH-funded researchers find off-patent antibiotics effectively combat MRSA skin infections
Researchers funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have found that two common antibiotic treatments work equally well against bacterial skin infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) acquired outside of hospital settings. Known as community-associated MRSA, or CA-MRSA, these skin infections have been reported in athletes, daycare-age children, students, military personnel and prison inmates, among others, and can lead to hospitalization, surgical procedures, bacteria in the blood, and in severe cases, death.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Emily Mullin
emily.mullin@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 12-Mar-2015
Cell
NIH researchers develop database on healthy immune system
An extensive database identifying immune traits, such as how immune cell function is regulated at the genetic level in healthy people, is reported by researchers from NIH and their collaborators. While many genetic risk factors have been linked to various diseases, including autoimmune disorders, how a genetic change causes susceptibility to a disease is not always clear. By studying healthy people, researchers from the NIAID Vaccine Research Center and colleagues from King's College London have created a reference resource for other scientists.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 11-Mar-2015
Neuron
Study reveals how genetic changes lead to familial Alzheimer's disease
Mutations in the presenilin-1 gene are the most common cause of inherited, early-onset forms of Alzheimer's disease. In a new study, published in Neuron, scientists replaced the normal mouse presenilin-1 gene with Alzheimer's-causing forms of the human gene to discover how these genetic changes may lead to the disorder. Their surprising results may transform the way scientists design drugs that target these mutations to treat inherited or familial Alzheimer's, a rare form of the disease.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Alzheimer's Association, Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 9-Mar-2015
Fertility & Sterility
Physical labor, hypertension and multiple meds may reduce male fertility
Working in a physically demanding job, having high blood pressure, and taking multiple medications are among health risks that may undermine a man's fertility, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and Stanford University, Stanford, California. The study is the first to examine the relationships between workplace exertion, health, and semen quality as men are trying to conceive. The results were published online in Fertility and Sterility.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Bock or Meredith Daly
bockr@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 6-Mar-2015
NIH-led study to assess community-based hepatitis C treatment in Washington, D.C.
Officials from NIH and the city of Washington, D.C., launched a clinical trial to examine whether primary care physicians and other health care providers, such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, can use a new antiviral therapy as effectively as specialist physicians to treat people with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The trial, which will involve 600 adult D.C. residents infected with HCV alone or co-infected with HCV and HIV, also will examine the long-term effects of the treatment.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
hillary.hoffman@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Nature
Scientists map memorable tunes in the rat brain
Lights, sound, action: we are constantly learning how to incorporate outside sensations into our reactions in specific situations. In a new study, brain scientists have mapped changes in communication between nerve cells as rats learned to make specific decisions in response to particular sounds. The team then used this map to accurately predict the rats' reactions. These results add to our understanding of how the brain processes sensations and forms memories to inform behavior.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute of Deafness and Other Communications Disorders

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
Cell
HIV controls its activity independent of host cells
A major hurdle to curing people of HIV infection is the way the virus hides in a reservoir composed primarily of dormant immune cells. It is generally believed that HIV does not replicate in these cells because the virus depends on active cellular machinery to do so. Now, two new papers by NIAID grantees propose that the virus itself -- not cells -- controls whether HIV is replicating, and that periods of latency paradoxically give the virus a survival advantage.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
Liberia-US clinical research partnership opens trial to test Ebola treatments
In partnership with the Liberian government, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases today launched a clinical trial to obtain safety and efficacy data on the investigational drug ZMapp as a treatment for Ebola virus disease. The study, which will be conducted in Liberia and the United States, is a randomized controlled trial enrolling adults and children with known Ebola virus infection.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jennifer Routh
jennifer.routh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
NIH-funded researchers identify genetic region associated with peanut allergy
An NIH-funded research suggests that changes in a small region of chromosome 6 are risk factors for peanut allergy in US children of European descent. The genetic risk area is located among two tightly linked genes that regulate the presentation of allergens and microbial products to the immune system. This study is the first to use a genome-wide screening approach in patients with well-defined food allergy to identify risks for peanut allergy.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
linda.huynh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
2015 AAAAI Annual Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
Study finds peanut consumption in infancy prevents peanut allergy
Introduction of peanut products into the diets of infants at high risk of developing peanut allergy was safe and led to an 81 percent reduction in the subsequent development of the allergy, a clinical trial has found. The study was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and was conducted by the NIAID-funded Immune Tolerance Network.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
NIH-sponsored HIV vaccine trial launches in South Africa
A clinical trial has launched in South Africa to study an investigational HIV vaccine regimen for safety and the immune responses it generates in volunteers. This experimental regimen is based on the one tested in the RV144 trial - -the first to demonstrate that a vaccine can protect people from HIV infection -- but is designed to potentially provide greater protection and is adapted to the predominant HIV subtype in southern Africa.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Nature
NIH-funded scientists create potential long-acting HIV therapeutic
Scientists have created a new molecule that shows promise for controlling HIV without daily anti-retroviral drugs. The molecule foils a wider range of HIV strains in the laboratory than any known broadly neutralizing HIV antibody and is more powerful than some of the most potent of these antibodies. In addition, the molecule safely protected monkeys from infection with an HIV-like virus during a 40-week study period.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
NIH-supported trials to evaluate long-acting injectable anti-retrovirals to prevent HIV
Two new clinical trials are examining the safety and acceptability of antiretroviral medicines administered via injection as a means of protecting against HIV infection. The studies are being funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and conducted by the NIAID-funded HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN).
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Robin Tricoles
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
NIH expands key tuberculosis research program
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, is expanding its Tuberculosis Research Units program in an effort to drive innovation in tuberculosis research. NIAID is awarding up to $15.2 million in fiscal year 2015 and as much as $105.3 million over seven years to fund four institutions that will act as a collaborative TBRU network.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Emily Mullin
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
Nature
NIH-supported researchers map epigenome of more than 100 tissue and cell types
Much like mapping the human genome laid the foundations for understanding the genetic basis of human health, new maps of the human epigenome may further unravel the complex links between DNA and disease. The epigenome is part of the machinery that helps direct how genes are turned off and on in different types of cells.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Robin Mackar
rmackar@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-0073
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 18-Feb-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Eylea outperforms other drugs for diabetic macular edema with moderate vision loss
In an NIH-supported clinical trial comparing three drugs for diabetic macular edema, Eylea provided greater visual improvement, on average, than did Avastin or Lucentis when vision was 20/50 or worse at the start of the trial. However, the three drugs resulted in similar average improvement when starting vision was 20/40 to 20/32. Investigators found no major differences in the safety of the three drugs. The trial was funded by the National Eye Institute.
National Institutes of Health, NIh/National Eye Institute, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Dustin Hays
neinews@nei.nih.gov
301-496-5248
NIH/National Eye Institute

Public Release: 16-Feb-2015
Nature
NIH researchers reveal link between powerful gene regulatory elements and autoimmune diseases
Investigators with the National Institutes of Health have discovered the genomic switches of a blood cell key to regulating the human immune system. The findings, published in Nature today, open the door to new research and development in drugs and personalized medicine to help those with autoimmune disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease or rheumatoid arthritis.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Trish Reynolds
reynoldsp2@mail.nih.gov
301-496-8190
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Public Release: 12-Feb-2015
Emerging Infectious Diseases
NIH Ebola study in macaques provides timeframes for post-mortem viral stability
To determine how long Ebola virus could remain infectious in a body after death, NIH scientists sampled deceased Ebola-infected monkeys and discovered the virus remained viable for at least seven days. They also detected non-infectious viral RNA for up to 70 days post-mortem.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ken Pekoc
kpekoc@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Nationwide study reports shifts in Americans' use of natural products
A nationally representative survey shows that natural product use in the United States has shifted since 2007, with some products becoming more popular and some falling out of favor. Overall, natural products (dietary supplements other than vitamins and minerals) remain the most common complementary health approach. The complementary health questionnaire was developed by NIH's National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.
NIH/National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact: NCCIH Press Office
nccihpress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-7790
NIH/National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Public Release: 11-Feb-2015
Nationwide survey reveals widespread use of mind and body practices
A large nationally representative survey shows that the number of Americans using mind and body approaches to improve health and well-being remains high. Of note is a significant increase in the use of yoga since 2002. In addition, almost as many Americans practice meditation or receive chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation. The complementary health questionnaire was developed by NIH's National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.
NIH/National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics

Contact: NCCIH Press Office
nccihpress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-7790
NIH/National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Showing releases 1-25 out of 84.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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