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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

NIH Research News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 97.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
New view of mouse genome finds many similarities, striking differences with human genome
Looking across the genomes of humans and mice, scientists have found that, in general, the systems that are used to control gene activity in both species have many similarities, along with crucial differences. The results may offer insights into gene regulation and other systems important to mammalian biology, and provide new information to determine when the mouse is an appropriate model to study human biology and disease. They may also help explain its limitations.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steven Benowitz
steven.benowitz@gmail.com
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
HHS and NIH take steps to enhance transparency of clinical trial results
The US Department of Health and Human Services today issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, which proposes regulations to implement reporting requirements for clinical trials that are subject to Title VIII of the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007.

Contact: NIH Office of Communications
nihnmb@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5787
NIH/Office of the Director

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
NIH-sponsored study identifies superior drug regimen for preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission
For HIV-infected women in good immune health, taking a three-drug regimen during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission more effectively than taking one drug during pregnancy, another during labor and two more after giving birth, an international clinical trial has found.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 15-Nov-2014
ASN Kidney Week 2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Two drugs are no more effective than 1 to treat common kidney disease
Using two drugs was no more effective than a single drug in slowing disease progression in people with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), according to two studies funded by the National Institutes of Health. One of the studies also showed that rigorous blood pressure treatment slowed growth of kidney cysts, a marker of ADPKD, but had little effect on kidney function compared to standard blood pressure treatment.

Contact: Krysten Carrera
NIDDKMedia@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3583
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
NIDA researchers confirm important brain reward pathway
Details of the role of glutamate, the brain's excitatory chemical, in a drug reward pathway have been identified for the first time. This discovery in rodents -- published today in Nature Communications -- shows that stimulation of glutamate neurons in a specific brain region leads to activation of dopamine-containing neurons in the brain's reward circuit.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse Intramural Research Program

Contact: NIDA Press Office
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Soldiers at increased suicide risk after leaving hospital
US Army soldiers hospitalized with a psychiatric disorder have a significantly elevated suicide risk in the year following discharge from the hospital, according to research from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers. The yearly suicide rate for this group, 263.9 per 100,000 soldiers, was far higher than the rate of 18.5 suicides per 100,000 in the Regular Army for the same study period, the study found.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Michaelle Scanlon
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Lancet
New drug for common liver disease improves liver health
An experimental drug aimed at treating a common liver disease showed promising results and potential problems in a multicenter clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health. The FLINT study found that people with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis who took obeticholic acid had improved liver health during that period, including decreased inflammation and fat in the liver and decreased body weight versus people receiving a placebo. OCA was also associated with increases in itching and total cholesterol.

Contact: Media Office
NIDDKMedia@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3583
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Public Release: 6-Nov-2014
Environmental Health Perspectives
Diversity Outbred mice better predict potential human responses to chemical exposures
A genetically diverse mouse model is able to predict the range of response to chemical exposures that might be observed in human populations, researchers from the National Institutes of Health have found. Like humans, each Diversity Outbred mouse is genetically unique, and the extent of genetic variability among these mice is similar to the genetic variation seen among humans.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Robin Mackar
rmackar@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-0073
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
NIMH creates new unit to support its research domain criteria initiative
A new effort by the National Institutes of Health will facilitate communication among scientists, clinicians, and the public to reframe mental health research, from diagnosis to treatment. The Research Domain Criteria unit was recently established by the National Institute of Mental Health, part of NIH, to support the development of the institute's RDoC initiative.

Contact: Keri Chiodo
NIMHPress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
HIV Research for Prevention (HIV R4P) Conference
Model by NIH grantees explains why HIV prevention dosing differs by sex
A mathematical model developed by NIH grantees predicts that women must take the antiretroviral medication Truvada daily to prevent HIV infection via vaginal sex, whereas just two doses per week can protect men from HIV infection via anal sex. This finding helps explain why two large clinical trials testing HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, in women failed to show efficacy.
NIAID

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
Researchers uncover new evidence revealing molecular paths to autism
In the largest study of its kind, researchers used DNA sequencing to uncover dozens of genes that heighten autism risk. Scientists examined more than 14,000 DNA samples from affected children, parents and others, identifying changes in 107 genes that likely contribute to the risk for autism spectrum disorder. The findings provide a better understanding of genetic and cellular changes in pathways and processes possibly involved in ASD, and eventually may help lead to potential therapies.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steven Benowitz
steven.benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
NIH-led study explores prevention of heart disease in HIV-infected people
The National Institutes of Health has launched a clinical trial to assess the effects of aspirin and cholesterol-lowering drugs, or statins, on preventing cardiovascular disease in people with long-term HIV infections. This group, which includes people on antiretroviral therapy as well as 'elite controllers' who can limit the virus without antiretroviral therapy, have a higher risk of developing heart disease and stroke compared to the general population.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
linda.huynh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Cell
TCGA study improves understanding of genetic drivers of thyroid cancer
An analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas -- the most common form of thyroid cancer -- provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other alterations driving disease development. The findings also may help improve diagnosis and treatment. Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified new molecular subtypes that will help clinicians determine which tumors are more aggressive and which are more likely to respond to certain treatments.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: Steven Benowitz
steven.benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
NIH begins early human clinical trial of VSV Ebola vaccine
Human testing of a second investigational Ebola vaccine candidate is under way at the National Institutes of Health's Clinical Center. Researchers at NIAID are conducting the early phase trial to evaluate the vaccine, called VSV-ZEBOV, for safety and its ability to generate an immune system response in healthy adults who are given two intramuscular doses, called a prime-boost strategy. The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research is simultaneously testing the vaccine candidate as a single dose at its Clinical Trials Center.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Kathy Stover
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Translational Psychiatry
Rapid agent restores pleasure-seeking ahead of other antidepressant action
A drug being studied as a fast-acting mood-lifter restored pleasure-seeking behavior independent of -- and ahead of -- its other antidepressant effectsWithin 40 minutes after a single infusion of ketamine, treatment-resistant depressed bipolar disorder patients experienced a reversal of a key symptom -- loss of interest in pleasurable activities -- which lasted up to 14 days. Brain scans traced the agent's action to boosted activity in areas at the front and deep in the right hemisphere of the brain.
National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Using social media to better understand, prevent, and treat substance use
More than $11 million over three years will be used to support research exploring the use of social media to advance the scientific understanding, prevention, and treatment of substance use and addiction. The awards are funded through the Collaborative Research on Addiction at NIH, an NIH consortium involving NIAAA, NIDA and NCI.
NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: NIDA Press Office
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
NIH grants license agreement for candidate Ebola vaccines
NIAID today announced a new license agreement aimed at advancing dual-purpose candidate vaccines to protect against rabies and Ebola viruses. The vaccines were created by scientists at NIAID and Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia and are being further developed through a partnership with the German pharmaceutical company IDT Biologika. The candidate vaccines now have been licensed to Exxell BIO of Saint Paul, Minnesota, which aims to advance the products through clinical testing and commercialization.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
hillary.hoffman@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
Scientists sniff out unexpected role for stem cells in the brain
For decades, scientists thought that neurons in the brain were born only during the early development period and could not be replenished. More recently, however, they discovered cells with the ability to divide and turn into new neurons in specific brain regions. Scientists at the National Institutes of Health report that newly formed brain cells in the mouse olfactory system -- the area that processes smells -- play a critical role in maintaining proper connections.
National Institutes of Health Intramural Program

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
NIH funds research consortia to study more than 200 rare diseases
Physician scientists at 22 consortia will collaborate with representatives of 98 patient advocacy groups to advance clinical research and investigate new treatments for patients with rare diseases. The collaborations are made possible through awards by the National Institutes of Health -- totaling about $29 million in fiscal year 2014 funding -- to expand the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network, which is led by NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Bobbi Gardner
bobbi.gardner@nih.gov
301-435-0888
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Science
NIH-supported scientists unveil structure, dynamics of key HIV molecules
New research has illuminated the movement and complete structure of the spikes on HIV that the virus uses to bind to the cells it infects. This research, led by scientists at the National Institutes of Health, Weill Cornell Medical College and Yale University School of Medicine, could help advance efforts to develop HIV vaccines and treatments.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Increased health risks linked to first-episode psychosis
Many patients with psychosis develop health risks associated with premature death early in the course of their mental illness. Patients with schizophrenia are already known to have higher rates of premature death than the general population. Elevated risks of heart disease and metabolic issues such as high blood sugar in people with first episode psychosis are due to an interaction of mental illness, unhealthy lifestyle behaviors and antipsychotic medications that may accelerate these risks.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Michaelle Scanlon
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Gene therapy shows promise for severe combined immunodeficiency
Researchers have found that gene therapy using a modified delivery system, or vector, can restore the immune systems of children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), a rare, life-threatening inherited condition that primarily affects boys.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
hillary.hoffman@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
JAMA
Candidate H7N9 avian flu vaccine works better with adjuvant
An experimental vaccine to protect people against H7N9 avian influenza prompted immune responses in 59 percent of volunteers who received two injections at the lowest dosage tested, but only if the vaccine was mixed with adjuvant -- substance that boosts the body's response to vaccination. Without adjuvant, immune responses produced by the investigational vaccine were minimal regardless of vaccine dosage, according to findings from a clinical trial sponsored by NIAID, part of NIH.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne A. Oplinger
aoplinger@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
HHS releases 13th Report on Carcinogens
Four substances have been added in the US Department of Health and Human Services 13th Report on Carcinogens, a science-based document that identifies chemical, biological, and physical agents that are considered cancer hazards for people living in the United States. The new report includes 243 listings.
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Toxicology Program

Contact: Robin Mackar
rmackar@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-0073
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
NIH awards 7 new vaccine adjuvant discovery contracts
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded seven research contracts to discover and characterize new adjuvants, or substances formulated as part of vaccines to enhance their protective ability.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
hillary.hoffman@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Showing releases 1-25 out of 97.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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