NIH Director Page NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIH Social Media and Outreach
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Videos
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

NIH Research News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 90.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 29-May-2015
Nature Methods
A patient's budding cortex -- in a dish?
Scientists have perfected mini cultured 3-D structures that grow and function much like the outer mantle -- the key working tissue, or cortex -- of the brain of the person from whom they were derived. Strikingly, these 'organoids' buzz with neuronal network activity. Cells talk with each other in circuits, much as they do in our brains.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 28-May-2015
JAMA Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery
Nearly 1 in 7 Hispanic/Latino adults has some hearing loss
In the largest study to date of hearing loss among Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States, researchers have found that nearly 1 in 7 has hearing loss, a number similar to the general population prevalence. The analysis also looked at the differences between subgroups and found that Hispanics of Puerto Rican descent have the highest rate of hearing loss, while Mexican-Americans have the lowest.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: NIDCD Press Office
news@nidcd.nih.gov
301-496-7243
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Public Release: 27-May-2015
Starting antiretroviral treatment early improves outcomes for HIV-infected individuals
A major international randomized clinical trial has found that HIV-infected individuals have a considerably lower risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses if they start taking antiretroviral drugs sooner, when their CD4+ T-cell count--a key measure of immune system health -- is higher, instead of waiting until the CD4+ cell count drops to lower levels.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 22-May-2015
Science
Scientists create mice with a major genetic cause of ALS and FTD
Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla., created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, Mayo Clinic Foundation, Mayo Clinic Center for Regenerative Medicine, Mayo Graduate School, ALS Association, Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins, Target ALS, and others

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 20-May-2015
Animals' presence may ease social anxiety in kids with autism
When animals are present, children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have lower readings on a device that detects anxiety and other forms of social arousal when interacting with their peers. According to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health, companion animals -- like dogs, cats or the guinea pigs in the study --may prove to be a helpful addition to treatment programs designed to help children with ASDs improve their social skills and interactions with other people.
National Institutes of Health; WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition

Contact: Robert Bock
bockr@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Immunity
New form of interleukin-2 could be fine-tuned to fight disease
Scientists are reporting development of a new way to modify interleukin-2 (IL-2), a substance known as a cytokine that plays key roles in regulating immune system responses, in order to fine-tune its actions. Harnessing the action of IL-2 in a controllable fashion is of clinical interest with potential benefit in a range of situations, including transplantation and autoimmune disease.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: NHLBI Engagement and Media Relations Branch
nhlbi_news@nhlbi.nih.gov
301-496-4236
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Public Release: 19-May-2015
Nature Immunology
HIV reservoirs remain obstacles to cure
Antiretroviral therapy has proven lifesaving for people infected with HIV; however, the medications are a lifelong necessity for most HIV-infected individuals and present practical, logistical, economic and health-related challenges. A primary research goal is to find an HIV cure that either clears the virus from an infected person's body or enables HIV-infected individuals to suppress virus levels and replication to extremely low levels without the need for daily ART.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Robin Tricoles
robin.tricoles@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-May-2015
Nature Methods
Microchip captures clusters of circulating tumor cells -- NIH study
Researchers have developed a microfluidic chip that can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells, which could yield important new insights into how cancer spreads. The work was funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Margot Kern
nibibpress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3500
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering

Public Release: 15-May-2015
Intel International Science and Engineering Fair
Pain reliever investigation wins top NIH Addiction Science Award
A project identifying novel compounds that could be used for pain relief was awarded a first place Addiction Science Award at the 2015 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair -- the world's largest science competition for high school students. The awards are coordinated by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health, and Friends of NIDA, a coalition that supports NIDA's mission.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, Friends of NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: NIDA Press Office
Media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 13-May-2015
Neurology
A SMARTer approach to stroke care
Time is critical when it comes to stroke, and early treatment is associated with better outcomes. According to the Screening with MRI for Accurate and Rapid stroke Treatment (SMART) study, small changes in quality improvement procedures enabled clinicians to use MRI scans to diagnose stroke patients before giving acute treatment, within 60 minutes of hospital arrival. MRI scans provide detailed images but take longer to complete than CT scans, which are commonly used in most centers.

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Cell
Scientists unravel the mystery of the tubulin code
Driving down the highway, you encounter ever-changing signs -- speed limits, exits, food and gas options. Seeing these roadside markers may cause you to slow down, change lanes or start thinking about lunch. In a similar way, cellular structures called microtubules are tagged with a variety of chemical markers that can influence cell functions. The pattern of these markers makes up the 'tubulin code' and scientists have uncovered the mechanism behind one of the main writers of this code.

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Diabetes
Ease of weight loss influenced by individual biology
For the first time in a lab, researchers at the National Institutes of Health found evidence supporting the commonly held belief that people with certain physiologies lose less weight than others when limiting calories. Study results published May 11 in Diabetes.

Contact: Krysten Carrera
NIDDKMedia@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3583
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Public Release: 7-May-2015
Science
New GTEx findings show how DNA differences influence gene activity, disease susceptibility
Researchers funded by the NIH Genotype-Tissue Expression project have created a data resource to help establish how differences in individual genomic make-up can affect gene activity and contribute to disease. It will enable scientists to examine the genomics of different human tissues and cells. Investigators reported findings from a pilot study, providing insights into how genomic variants control when and how much genes are turned on and off in tissues, and predispose people to disease.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Healt, NIH/Common Fund

Contact: Steven Benowitz
steven.benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 7-May-2015
Science
Near-atomic resolution of protein structure by electron microscopy holds promise
A new study shows that it is possible to use an imaging technique called cryo-electron microscopy to view, in near-atomic detail, the architecture of a metabolic enzyme bound to a drug that blocks its activity. This advance provides a new path for solving molecular structures that may revolutionize drug development, noted the researchers.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: NCI Press Officers
ncipressofficer@mail.nih.gov
301-496-6641
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Nature Communications
NIH study solves ovarian cell mystery, shedding new light on reproductive disorders
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have solved a long-standing mystery about the origin of one of the cell types that make up the ovary. The team also discovered how ovarian cells share information during development of an ovarian follicle, which holds the maturing egg. Researchers believe this new information on basic ovarian biology will help them better understand the cause of ovarian disorders that result in hormone imbalances and infertility in women.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Robin Arnette
arnetter@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-5143
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 6-May-2015
Science Translational Medicine
Mobile phone microscope rapidly detects parasite levels in blood
Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, and the University of California, Berkeley, and colleagues have developed a mobile phone microscope to measure blood levels of the parasitic filarial worm Loa loa. The point-of-care device may enable safe resumption of mass drug administration campaigns to eradicate the parasitic diseases onchocerciasis (river blindness) and lymphatic filariasis (elephantiasis).
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
hillary.hoffman@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 4-May-2015
Nature Medicine
Study points to possible treatment for lethal pediatric brain cancer
Using brain tumor samples collected from children in the United States and Europe, an international team of scientists found that the drug panobinostat and similar gene regulating drugs may be effective at treating diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas, an aggressive and lethal form of pediatric cancer.
National Institutes of Health, DIPG Collaborative, Cure Starts Now Foundation, Reflections of Grace Foundation, Smiles for Sophie Foundation, Cancer-Free Kids Foundation, Carly's Crusade Foundation and others

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
thomaschr@ninds.nih.gov
30-149-657-511
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 3-May-2015
2015 Association for Reseach in Vision and Ophthalmology annual meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
NIH-funded study points way forward for retinal disease gene therapy
Leber congenital amaurosis is an inherited disorder that causes vision loss starting in childhood. This is the latest report from an ongoing clinical trial of gene therapy for the disorder, funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Kathryn DeMott, Joe Balintfy
neinews@nei.nih.gov
301-496-5248
NIH/National Eye Institute

Public Release: 1-May-2015
ARVO 2015 Annual Meeting
NIH launches research to gaze deeply into your eyes
Five bold projects will develop new technology to noninvasively image cells of the eye in unprecedented detail. The National Eye Institute (NEI) announced the awards as part of its Audacious Goals Initiative. NEI has committed $3.8 million to the projects in 2015 and up to $17.9 million over the next five years, pending the availability of funds. NEI is part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Joe Balintfy
joe.balintfy@nih.gov
301-496-5248
NIH/National Eye Institute

Public Release: 30-Apr-2015
Neuron
Souped-up remote control switches behaviors on-and-off in mice
Neuroscientists have perfected a chemical-genetic remote control for brain circuitry and behavior. This evolving technology can now sequentially switch the same neurons -- and the behaviors they mediate -- on-and-off in mice, say researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. Such bidirectional control is pivotal for decoding the brain workings of complex behaviors. The findings are the first to be published from the first wave of NIH grants awarded last fall under the BRAIN Initiative.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 29-Apr-2015
Nature
Brain circuitry for positive vs. negative memories discovered in mice
Neuroscientists have discovered brain circuitry for encoding positive and negative learned associations in mice. After finding that two circuits showed opposite activity following fear and reward learning, the researchers proved that this divergent activity causes either avoidance or reward-driven behaviors. They used cutting-edge optical-genetic tools to pinpoint these mechanisms critical to survival, which are also implicated in mental illness.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 25-Apr-2015
Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
Two treatments yield similar results for children after cardiac arrest
A large-scale, multicenter study has shown that emergency body cooling does not improve survival rates or reduce brain injury in infants and children with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest more than normal temperature control. Until now, this treatment has not been studied in infants or children admitted to hospitals with cardiac arrest.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: NHLBI Engagement and Media Relations Branch
NHLBI_NEWS@nih.gov
301-496-4236
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
Nature
Drugs that activate brain stem cells may reverse multiple sclerosis
Two drugs already on the market -- an antifungal and a steroid -- may potentially take on new roles as treatments for multiple sclerosis. According to a study published in Nature today, researchers discovered that these drugs may activate stem cells in the brain to stimulate myelin-producing cells and repair white matter, which is damaged in multiple sclerosis. The study was partially funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, New York Stem Cell Foundation, Myelin Repair Foundation

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 20-Apr-2015
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Global pandemic of fake medicines poses urgent risk, scientists say
Poor quality medicines are an urgent threat that could undermine decades of successful efforts to combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and TB, according to the editors of a journal supplement published today. Scientists report up to 41 percent of specimens failed to meet quality standards in global studies of about 17,000 drug samples. Seventeen articles are included in the supplement 'The Global Pandemic of Falsified Medicines,' published by The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
NIH/Fogarty International Center, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, New Venture Fund

Contact: Ann Puderbaugh
ann.puderbaugh@nih.gov
301-402-8614
NIH/Fogarty International Center

Public Release: 15-Apr-2015
NIH launches largest clinical trial focused on HIV-related cardiovascular disease
Researchers have begun enrolling participants in a multicenter international clinical trial to test whether a statin can reduce the risk of heart disease in people with HIV infection, who are up to twice as likely as people without HIV infection to have heart disease. The trial is supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, both part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Showing releases 1-25 out of 90.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2015 by AAAS, the science society.