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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

NIH Research News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 98.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 31-Aug-2015
Nature
Circuit in the eye relies on built-in delay to see small moving objects
When we move our head, the whole visual world moves across our eyes. Yet we can still make out a bee buzzing by or a hawk flying overhead, thanks to unique cells in the eye called object motion sensors. A new study on mice helps explain how these cells do their job, and may bring scientists closer to understanding how complex circuits are formed throughout the nervous system. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health, and was published online in Nature.
NIH/National Eye Institute, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Kathryn DeMott
neinews@nei.nih.gov
301-496-5248
NIH/National Eye Institute

Public Release: 27-Aug-2015
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Short bouts of activity may offset lack of sustained exercise in kids
Brief intervals of exercise during otherwise sedentary periods may offset the lack of more sustained exercise and could protect children against diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer, according to a small study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Children who interrupted periods of sitting with three minutes of moderate-intensity walking every half hour had lower levels of blood glucose and insulin, compared to periods when they remained seated for three hours.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Meredith Daly
dalym@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 26-Aug-2015
Environmental Health Perspectives
Low-level arsenic exposure before birth associated with early puberty and obesity
Female mice exposed in utero, or in the womb, to low levels of arsenic through drinking water displayed signs of early puberty and became obese as adults, according to scientists from the National Institutes of Health. The finding is significant because the exposure level of 10 parts per billion used in the study is the current US Environmental Protection Agency standard, or maximum allowable amount, for arsenic in drinking water.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Robin Arnette
arnetter@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-5143
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 25-Aug-2015
JAMA
NIH study shows no benefit of omega-3 supplements for cognitive decline
A large clinical trial found that omega-3 supplements did not slow cognitive decline in older persons. With 4,000 patients followed over a five-year period, the study is one of the largest and longest of its kind.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Eye Institute, NIH/National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and others

Contact: Joe Balintfy
neinews@nei.nih.gov
301-496-5248
NIH/National Eye Institute

Public Release: 21-Aug-2015
Undergrad biomedical engineering teams win NIH's DEBUT Challenge
Three unique projects focused on improving global health won the National Institutes of Health's Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams Challenge. The winners showed exemplary initiative in designing tools for a less expensive, portable device to monitor HIV treatment, a new surgical clamp to treat drooping eyelids, and a low-cost patient monitor.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Jessica Meade
NIBIBpress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3500
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering

Public Release: 19-Aug-2015
Science Translational Medicine
NIH scientists and colleagues successfully test MERS vaccine in monkeys and camels
NIH scientists and colleagues report that an experimental vaccine given six weeks before exposure to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) fully protects rhesus macaques from disease. The vaccine also generated potentially protective MERS-CoV antibodies in blood drawn from vaccinated camels. MERS-CoV, which causes pneumonia deep in the lungs, emerged in 2012 and has sickened more than 1,400 people and killed 500, mostly in the Middle East and Asia.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ken Pekoc
kpekoc@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-Aug-2015
JAMA
Teens using e-cigarettes may be more likely to start smoking tobacco
Students who have used electronic cigarettes by the time they start ninth grade are more likely than others to start smoking traditional cigarettes and other combustible tobacco products within the next year, according to a new study funded by the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: NIDA Press Office
Media@nida.nih.gov
301-594-8040
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 18-Aug-2015
Immunity
In uveitis, bacteria in gut may instruct immune cells to attack the eye
The inflammatory eye disorder autoimmune uveitis occurs when a person's immune system goes awry, attacking proteins in the eye. What spurs this response is a mystery, but now a study on mice suggests that bacteria in the gut may provide a kind of training ground for immune cells to attack the eye. The study was conducted by researchers at the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Kathryn DeMott
neinews@nei.nih.gov
301-496-5248
NIH/National Eye Institute

Public Release: 17-Aug-2015
Nature Neuroscience
Scientists uncover nuclear process in the brain that may affect disease
Every brain cell has a nucleus, or a central command station. Scientists have shown that the passage of molecules through the nucleus of a star-shaped brain cell, called an astrocyte, may play a critical role in health and disease.
National Institutes of Health, European Commission, German Research Foundation, US National Multiple Sclerosis Society, American Heart Association, German Academic Exchange Service.

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 14-Aug-2015
Cell
Newly discovered cells restore liver damage in mice without cancer risk
The liver is unique among organs in its ability to regenerate after being damaged. Exactly how it repairs itself remained a mystery until recently, when researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health discovered a type of cell in mice essential to the process. The researchers also found similar cells in humans.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Virginia Guidry
virginia.guidry@nih.gov
919-541-1993
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
Cell
NIH-funded study establishes genomic data set on Lassa virus
An international team of researchers has developed the largest genomic data set in the world on Lassa virus (LASV). The genomic catalog contains nearly 200 viral genomes collected from patient and field samples from the major host of Lassa virus -- the multimammate rat. The study suggests that these four LASV strains originated from a common ancestral virus more than 1,000 years ago and spread across West Africa within the last several hundred years.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
linda.huynh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
Cell Metabolism
NIH study finds cutting dietary fat reduces body fat more than cutting carbs
In a recent study, restricting dietary fat led to body fat loss at a rate 68 percent higher than cutting the same number of carbohydrate calories when adults with obesity ate strictly controlled diets. Carb restriction lowered production of the fat-regulating hormone insulin and increased fat burning as expected, whereas fat restriction had no observed changes in insulin production or fat burning.

Contact: Krysten Carrera
NIDDKMedia@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3583
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
Genetics in Medicine
New research reveals unintended consequences of using incorrect medical foods in managing patients
According to researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute, many 'medical foods' are designed to help manage patients with rare inborn errors of metabolism, and can help prevent serious and life-threatening complications. Unfortunately such special foods may cause harm in some patients when their use is not carefully monitored. They argue that such patients may need closer dietary management.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steven Benowitz
Steven.Benowitz@nih.gov
301-402-0911
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
Cell
NIH-developed Epstein-Barr virus vaccine elicits potent neutralizing antibodies in animals
NIAID researchers and their collaborators have developed an experimental, nanoparticle-based vaccine against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that can induce potent neutralizing antibodies in vaccinated mice and nonhuman primates. Microscopic particles, known as nanoparticles, are being investigated as potential delivery vehicles for vaccines. The scientists' findings suggest that using a structure-based vaccine design and self-assembling nanoparticles to deliver a viral protein that prompts an immune response could be a promising approach for developing an EBV vaccine for humans.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Emily Mullin
emily.mullin@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 13-Aug-2015
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Large percentage of youth with HIV may lack immunity to measles, mumps, rubella
Between one-third and one-half of individuals in the United States who were infected with HIV around the time of birth may not have sufficient immunity to ward off measles, mumps, and rubella -- even though they may have been vaccinated against these diseases. This estimate, from a National Institutes of Health research network, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is based on a study of more than 600 children and youth exposed to HIV in the womb.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Bock or Meredith Daly
dalym@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Neuron
Neurons' broken machinery piles up in ALS
NIH researchers have learned how a mutation in the gene for superoxide dismutase 1, which causes ALS, leads cells to accumulate damaged materials. The study, published in the journal Neuron, suggests a potential target for treating this familial form of ALS.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Division of Intramural Research

Contact: NINDS Press Team
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Nature Communications
Tell-tale biomarker detects early breast cancer in NIH-funded study
Researchers have shown that MRI can detect the earliest signs of breast cancer recurrence and fast-growing tumors. Their approach detects micromestastases, breakaway tumor cells with the potential to develop into dangerous secondary breast cancer tumors elsewhere in the body. The approach may offer an improved way to detect early recurrence of breast cancer. The work was completed at Case Western Reserve University and was funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of NIH.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Raymond A MacDougall
macdougallr@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3500
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Nature
PINK1 protein crucial for removing broken-down energy reactors
Scientists showed that a protein called PINK1 that is implicated in Parkinson's disease is critical for helping cells get rid of dysfunctional mitochondria.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorder and Stroke, Division of Intramural Research

Contact: NINDS Press Team
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Fetal ECG readings offer no advantage over heart rate monitoring during labor
A new technology that tracks the electrical activity of the fetal heart offers no advantages over conventional technology in preventing birth complications, according to a new study by the National Institutes of Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Bock or Meredith Daly
bockr@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 12-Aug-2015
Human Reproduction
Pelvic pain may be common among reproductive-age women, NIH study finds
A high proportion of reproductive-age women may be experiencing pelvic pain that goes untreated, according to a study by researchers from the National Institutes of Health and the University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Bock
bockr@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 7-Aug-2015
Cell
Scientists adopt new strategy to find Huntington's disease therapies
Scientists searched the chromosomes of more than 4,000 Huntington's disease patients and found that DNA repair genes may determine when the neurological symptoms begin. The results may provide a guide for discovering new treatments for Huntington's disease and a roadmap for studying other neurological disorders.
National Institutes of Health, Medical Research Council, CHDI Foundation

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 6-Aug-2015
Science
Single dose Ebola vaccine is safe and effective in monkeys against outbreak strain
NIH scientists report that a single dose of an experimental Ebola virus vaccine completely protects cynomolgus macaques against the current EBOV outbreak strain, EBOV-Makona, when given at least seven days before exposure, and partially protects them if given three days prior. The live-attenuated vaccine, VSV-EBOV, uses genetically engineered vesicular stomatitis virus to carry an EBOV gene that has safely induced protective immunity in macaques.
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ken Pekoc
kpekoc@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
Crystal clear images uncover secrets of hormone receptors
NIH scientists used atomic level images to show how the neuropeptide hormone neurotensin might activate its receptors. Their description is the first of its kind for a neuropeptide-binding G protein-coupled receptor, a class of receptors involved in a wide range of disorders and the target of many drugs.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stoke, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Science
HVTN 505 vaccine induced antibodies nonspecific for HIV
A study by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and Duke University helps explain why the candidate vaccine used in the HVTN 505 clinical trial was not protective against HIV infection despite robustly inducing anti-HIV antibodies: the vaccine stimulated antibodies that recognized HIV as well as microbes commonly found in the intestinal tract, part of the body's microbiome.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Journal of Neurotrauma
Paralyzed men move legs with new non-invasive spinal cord stimulation
Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords. The strategy, called transcutaneous stimulation, delivers electrical current to the spinal cord by way of electrodes strategically placed on the skin of the lower back. This expands to nine the number of completely paralyzed individuals who have achieved voluntary movement while receiving spinal stimulation.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Margot Kern
nibibpress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3500
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering

Showing releases 1-25 out of 98.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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