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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

NIH Research News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 83.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 28-Jan-2015
Nature
NIH-funded study uncovers molecular alterations in head and neck cancers
A new study shows genomic differences in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus. In addition, researchers have uncovered new smoking-related cancer subtypes and potential new drug targets, and found numerous genomic similarities with other cancer types. Together, this study's findings may provide detailed explanations of how HPV infection and smoking play roles in head and neck cancer risk and disease development, and offer potential diagnostic and treatment directions.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steven Benowitz
Steven.Benowitz@nih.gov
301-402-0911
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 27-Jan-2015
JAMA
Achieving a world without AIDS: Scale must give way to focus, details
The global AIDS community has its sights set on three new goals, known as the '90-90-90' targets. That is, by 2020, 90 percent of people living with HIV should know their HIV status, 90 percent of those who test positive for HIV should begin antiretroviral therapy (ART), and of those who begin ART, 90 percent should achieve virologic suppression, meaning their virus levels are not detectable using standard tests. Meeting these targets would be an enormous step toward a world without AIDS.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Robin Tricoles
robin.tricoles@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 23-Jan-2015
Science
Diaper compound may expand power of microscopes
A study, partially funded by the National Institutes of Health, showed that a modified form of the superabsorbent chemical used in disposable diapers can expand brain structures to four and a half times their original size. The process called expansion microscopy will allow scientists to take super-resolution pictures of healthy and diseased tissue throughout the body using common microscopes.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, New York Stem Cell Foundation, Jeremy & Joyce Wertheimer, Google, MIT Synthetic Intelligence Project, MIT Media Lab, MIT McGoveran Institute, MIT Neurotechnology Fund, and others

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
thomaschr@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 20-Jan-2015
Journal of Clinical Investigation
NIH researchers tackle thorny side of gene therapy
National Institutes of Health researchers have uncovered a key factor in understanding the elevated cancer risk associated with gene therapy. They conducted research on mice with a rare disease similar to one in humans, hoping their findings may eventually help improve gene therapy for humans. Researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute, part of NIH, published their research in the Jan. 20, 2015, online issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Raymond MacDougall
macdougallr@mail.nih.gov
301-443-3523
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 16-Jan-2015
Nature
Brain recalls old memories via new pathways
People with anxiety disorders, such as post traumatic stress disorder, often experience prolonged and exaggerated fearfulness. Now, an animal study suggests that this might involve disruption of a gradual shifting of brain circuitry for retrieving fear memories. Researchers have discovered in rats that an old fear memory is recalled by a separate brain pathway from the one originally used to recall it when it was fresh.
NIH / National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 14-Jan-2015
NIH expands early-stage human testing of infectious disease treatment candidates
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded contracts to three organizations to support early-stage human clinical trials of investigational infectious disease treatments. The new awards for the Phase I Clinical Trial Units for Therapeutics increases the number of funded organizations under the program from two to three, expanding capacity for conducting early safety testing of novel investigational drugs.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Emily Mullin
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 13-Jan-2015
Annals of Internal Medicine
Panel cites need for individualized, patient-centered approach for chronic pain
An independent panel convened by the National Institutes of Health concluded that individualized, patient-centered care is needed to treat and monitor the estimated 100 million Americans living with chronic pain. To achieve this aim, the panel recommends more research and development around the evidence-based, multidisciplinary approaches needed to balance patient perspectives, desired outcomes, and safety.

Contact: Deborah Langer
langerdh@od.nih.gov
301-443-4569
NIH/Office of Disease Prevention

Public Release: 12-Jan-2015
The Lancet
High hepatitis C cure rate seen in NIH-led trial of 6-week oral drug regimens
Thirty-eight of 40 volunteers with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections who received a combination of three direct-acting oral drugs for six weeks were cured in a clinical trial conducted at the National Institutes of Health. A six-week course of therapy is half the length of time previously shown to achieve a similar cure rate using two direct-acting oral HCV drugs only. The trial findings appear in The Lancet.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
NIH teams with industry to develop treatments for Niemann-Pick disease type C
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health have entered into an agreement with biotechnology company Vtesse, Inc., of Gaithersburg, Md., to develop treatments for Niemann-Pick disease type C and other lysosomal storage disorders.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences Office of Communications
info@ncats.nih.gov
301-435-0888
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)

Public Release: 7-Jan-2015
Nature
NIH grantees overcome hurdle to kill HIV-infected cells brought out of hiding
A major obstacle to curing people of HIV infection is the way the virus hides, in a reservoir primarily of dormant immune cells called resting memory CD4+ T cells. One potential approach to curing HIV infection is to awaken these latent CD4+ T cells so they start making HIV proteins. This would alert the immune system that the cells are infected, and, in theory, generate an immune response that kills them.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 6-Jan-2015
JAMA
Early blood glucose control lengthens life in people with type 1 diabetes
People with type 1 diabetes who intensively control their blood glucose, or blood sugar, early in their disease are likely to live longer than those who do not, according to research funded by the National Institutes of Health. The findings are the latest results of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and its follow-up, the Epidemiology of Diabetes Control and Complications study. Results were published online Jan. 6 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Amy Reiter
NIDDKMedia@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3583
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
Nature
Skin microbes trigger specific immune responses
New research in mice shows that the immune system in the skin develops distinct responses to the various microbes that naturally colonize the skin, referred to as commensals. A team led by scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, found that each type of microbe triggers unique aspects of the immune system, suggesting that immune cells found in the skin can rapidly sense and respond to changes in microbial communities.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 5-Jan-2015
NIH grants aim to decipher the language of gene regulation
NIH has awarded more than $28 million to researchers to decipher the language of how and when genes are turned on and off. These awards are from the Genomics of Gene Regulation program of the National Human Genome Research Institute. Researchers will study gene networks and pathways in body systems, such as skin, immune cells and lung. The resulting insights into the mechanisms may ultimately lead to new avenues for developing treatments for diseases.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Steven Benowitz
Steven.Benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 29-Dec-2014
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Estrogen worsens allergic reactions in mice
Estradiol, a type of estrogen, enhances the levels and activity in mice of an enzyme that drives life-threatening allergic reactions, according to NIAID researchers. The study results may help explain why women frequently experience more severe allergic reactions compared to men. Furthermore, the results reaffirm the importance of accounting for gender in the design of animal experiments.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 23-Dec-2014
The Lancet
Scientists report on trial of early-generation Ebola, Marburg vaccine candidates
esults of an early-stage clinical trial of two experimental vaccines against Ebola and Marburg viruses -- the first to be completed in an African country -- showed that they were safe and induced immune responses in healthy Ugandan adult volunteers.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 17-Dec-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Despite risks, benzodiazepine use highest in older people
Prescription use of benzodiazepines -- a widely used class of sedative and anti-anxiety medications -- increases steadily with age, despite the known risks for older people, according to a comprehensive analysis of benzodiazepine prescribing in the United States. Given existing guidelines cautioning health providers about benzodiazepine use among older adults, findings from the National Institutes of Health-funded study raise questions about why so many prescriptions -- many for long-term use -- are being written for this age group.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, New York State Psychiatric Institute

Contact: Charlotte Armstrong
nimhpress@mail.nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Teen prescription opioid abuse, cigarette, and alcohol use trends down
Use of cigarettes, alcohol, and abuse of prescription pain relievers among teens has declined since 2013 while marijuana use rates were stable, according to the 2014 Monitoring the Future (survey, released today by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. However, use of e-cigarettes, measured in the report for the first time, is high.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: NIDA Press Office
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
NIH initiates 'Centers Without Walls' to study sudden unexpected death in epilepsy
Nine groups of scientists will receive funding totaling $5.9 million in 2014 to work together on increasing the understanding of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy, the leading cause of death from epilepsy. The consortium becomes the second Center Without Walls, an initiative to speed the pace of research on difficult problems in epilepsy by promoting collaborative research. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health, funds this initiative.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science Translational Medicine
Imaging techniques reliably predict treatment outcomes for TB patients
Two medical imaging techniques, called positron emission tomography and computed tomography, could be used in combination as a biomarker to predict the effectiveness of antibiotic drug regimens being tested to treat tuberculosis patients, according to researchers at NIAID, part of NIH. With multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis on the rise worldwide, new biomarkers are needed to determine whether a particular TB drug regimen is effective.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Emily Mullin
emily.mullin@nih.gov
310-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
American Journal of Psychiatry
Medications for patients with first episode psychosis may not meet guidelines
Many patients with first-episode psychosis receive medications that do not comply with recommended guidelines for first-episode treatment, researchers have found. Current guidelines emphasize low doses of antipsychotic drugs and strategies for minimizing the side effects that might contribute to patients stopping their medication. A NIH-funded study finds that almost 40 percent of people with first-episode psychosis in community mental health clinics across the country might benefit from medication treatment changes.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Michaelle Scanlon
NIMHpress@mail.nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
NIH researchers link chromosome region to duplication of gene on X chromosome appears to cause excessive growth
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have found a duplication of a short stretch of the X chromosome in some people with a rare disorder that causes excessive childhood growth. They believe that a single gene within the region likely has a large influence on how much children grow. The research comes from a lab at the National Institutes of Health's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, which seeks to understand growth.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Bock or Meredith Daly
dalym@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Nature
Barrier-breaking drug may lead to spinal cord injury treatments
Injections of a new drug may partially relieve paralyzing spinal cord injuries, based on indications from a study in rats, which was partly funded by the National Institutes of Health
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Case Western Reserve University Council to Advance Human Health, Mrs. Suzanne Poon, Unite to Fight Paralysis, Brumagin Memorial Fund, Spinal Cord Injury Sucks, United Paralysis Foundation

Contact: Christopher Thomas
thomaschr@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 3-Dec-2014
Science Translational Medicine
NIH-led scientists describe new herpes treatment strategy
Scientists have developed a novel treatment approach for persistent viral infections such as herpes. Using animal models of herpes simplex virus infection, researchers show that blocking the activity of a host cell protein called LSD1 reduces herpes infection, shedding and recurrence.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
hillary.hoffman@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Sophisticated HIV diagnostics adapted for remote areas
Diagnosing HIV and other infectious diseases presents unique challenges in remote locations that lack electric power, refrigeration, and appropriately trained health care staff. To address these issues, researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have developed a low-cost, electricity-free device capable of detecting the DNA of infectious pathogens, including HIV-1.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Margot Kern
nibibpress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3500
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Pediatrics
Nearly 55 percent of US infants sleep with potentially unsafe bedding
Nearly 55 percent of US infants are placed to sleep with bedding that increases the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, despite recommendations against the practice, report researchers at the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other institutions.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Bock or Meredith Daly
bockr@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Showing releases 1-25 out of 83.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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