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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

NIH Research News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 96.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 31-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
Crystal clear images uncover secrets of hormone receptors
NIH scientists used atomic level images to show how the neuropeptide hormone neurotensin might activate its receptors. Their description is the first of its kind for a neuropeptide-binding G protein-coupled receptor, a class of receptors involved in a wide range of disorders and the target of many drugs.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stoke, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Science
HVTN 505 vaccine induced antibodies nonspecific for HIV
A study by researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and Duke University helps explain why the candidate vaccine used in the HVTN 505 clinical trial was not protective against HIV infection despite robustly inducing anti-HIV antibodies: the vaccine stimulated antibodies that recognized HIV as well as microbes commonly found in the intestinal tract, part of the body's microbiome.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 30-Jul-2015
Journal of Neurotrauma
Paralyzed men move legs with new non-invasive spinal cord stimulation
Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords. The strategy, called transcutaneous stimulation, delivers electrical current to the spinal cord by way of electrodes strategically placed on the skin of the lower back. This expands to nine the number of completely paralyzed individuals who have achieved voluntary movement while receiving spinal stimulation.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Margot Kern
nibibpress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3500
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering

Public Release: 28-Jul-2015
Nature Communications
Experimental MERS vaccine shows promise in animal studies
A two-step regimen of experimental vaccines against MERS prompted immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, report NIH scientists. Vaccinated mice produced broadly neutralizing antibodies against multiple strains of the MERS coronavirus, while vaccinated macaques were protected from severe lung damage when later exposed to MERS-CoV. The findings suggest that the current approach, in which vaccine design is guided by an understanding of structure of viral components and their interactions with host cells, holds promise for developing a similar human MERS vaccine regimen.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne A. Oplinger
aoplinger@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 27-Jul-2015
Development
Researchers identify protein in mice that helps prepare for healthy egg-sperm union
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have discovered a protein that plays a vital role in healthy egg-sperm union in mice. The protein RGS2 can delay an egg's development into an embryo in order to allow time for sperm to arrive and merge with the egg in a healthy fertilization process. The embryo cannot survive without the male chromosomes.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Robin Mackar
rmackar@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-0073
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 27-Jul-2015
Pediatrics
Many new mothers report no physician advice on infant sleep position, breastfeeding
Many new mothers do not receive potentially life saving advice from physicians on aspects of infant care such as sleep position, breastfeeding, immunization and pacifier use, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Bock
bockr@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 24-Jul-2015
American Journal of Psychiatry
Attention-control video game curbs combat vets' PTSD symptoms
A computerized attention-control training program significantly reduced combat veterans' preoccupation with - or avoidance of -- threat and attendant PTSD symptoms. By contrast, another type of computerized training, called attention bias modification - which has proven helpful in treating anxiety disorders - did not reduce PTSD symptoms. NIMH and Israeli researchers conducted parallel trials in which the two treatments were tested in US and Israeli combat veterans.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, At Ease USA

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
8th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention
New England Journal of Medicine
Early antiretroviral therapy prevents non-AIDS outcomes in HIV-infected people, study
Starting antiretroviral therapy early not only prevents serious AIDS-related diseases, but also prevents the onset of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people, according to a new analysis of data from the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment study, the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to establish that earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits all HIV-infected individuals. Rates of both serious AIDS-related events and serious non-AIDS-related events were significantly reduced with early therapy.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne Rancourt
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
8th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention
Dr. Fauci at IAS 2015: Comprehensive global prevention can end HIV/AIDS pandemic
Although much progress has been made in combating the global HIV/AIDS pandemic, to halt new infections and end the pandemic, a combination of non-vaccine and vaccine prevention modalities will be needed. Even with these tools, significant implementation gaps must be closed, says Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at NIH. Dr. Fauci addressed a special session at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention in Vancouver, Canada.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne Rancourt
anne.rancourt@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
Young South African women can adhere to daily PrEP regimen as HIV prevention, study finds
A clinical study funded by the NIH has found that young, single black women in South Africa adhered to a daily pill regimen to prevent HIV infection -- an HIV prevention strategy known as pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP. This finding is the first strong indication that this population at substantial HIV risk could accept and reliably adhere to daily PrEP dosing. Men who have sex with men and transgender women in New York and Thailand also successfully adhered to daily dosing.
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne Rancourt
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
8th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention
Study finds PrEP use feasible among high-risk groups in US community settings
A majority of men who have sex with men and transgender women at high risk for HIV infection took anti-HIV medication for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), most of the time, in a multi-site US study examining use of this HIV prevention strategy outside of a clinical trial. The study, called the PrEP Demo Project, was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 21-Jul-2015
mBio
Virus-like particle vaccine protects mice from many flu strains
A vaccine that protects against a wide variety of influenza viruses (a so-called universal flu vaccine) is a critical public health goal given the significant rates of illness and death caused by seasonal influenza and the potentially devastating effects of a pandemic influenza strain. Now, researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, have devised a way to induce protective immunity in mice against a wide array of influenza viruses.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
8th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention
HIV control through treatment durably prevents heterosexual transmission of virus
Antiretroviral treatment that consistently suppresses HIV is highly effective at preventing sexual transmission of the virus in heterosexual couples where one person is HIV-infected and the other is not, investigators report today at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment & Prevention in Vancouver, Canada.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
NIH joins public-private partnership to fund research on autism biomarkers
Government, nonprofit, and other private partners will fund a multi-year project to develop and improve clinical research tools for studying autism spectrum disorder. Led by James McPartland, Ph.D., of Yale University, this Biomarkers Consortium project will receive a total of $28 million over the next four years to test and refine clinical measures of social impairment in ASD in order to better evaluate potential behavioral and drug therapies.
National Institutes of Health, Foundation for the NIH, Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative

Contact: Keri Chiodo
NIMHPress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 20-Jul-2015
Nature Medicine
Study shows promise of precision medicine for most common type of lymphoma
A clinical trial has shown that patients with a specific molecular subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are more likely to respond to the drug ibrutinib (Imbruvica) than patients with another molecular subtype of the disease. The study appeared online July 20, 2015, in Nature Medicine.

Contact: NCI Press Officers
ncipressofficers@mail.nih.gov
301-496-6641
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Public Release: 17-Jul-2015
8th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention
Cholesterol metabolism in immune cells linked to HIV progression
Lower levels of cholesterol in certain immune cells -- a result of enhanced cholesterol metabolism within those cells -- may help explain why some HIV-infected people are able to naturally control disease progression, according to research that will be presented in a poster at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015). The findings provide a basis for potential development of new approaches to control HIV infection by regulating cellular cholesterol metabolism.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 16-Jul-2015
Cell
Futuristic brain probe allows for wireless control of neurons
A study showed that scientists can wirelessly determine the path a mouse walks with a press of a button. Researchers created a remote controlled, next-generation tissue implant that allows neuroscientists to inject drugs and shine lights on neurons deep inside the brains of mice. The revolutionary device is described online in the journal Cell. Its development was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy, Department of Defense National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 6-Jul-2015
NIH-funded vaccine for West Nile Virus enters human clinical trials
A clinical trial of a new investigational vaccine designed to protect against West Nile Virus infection will be sponsored by the NIAID. The experimental vaccine was discovered and developed by scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. The scientists were funded with a $7.2 million grant from NIAID, awarded in 2009. The new vaccine is being tested in a Phase 1 clinical trial at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Emily Mullin
emily.mullin@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 2-Jul-2015
EMBO Molecular Medicine
In blinding eye disease, trash-collecting cells go awry, accelerate damage
Spider-like cells inside the brain, spinal cord and eye hunt for invaders, capturing and then devouring them. These cells, called microglia, often play a beneficial role by helping to clear trash and protect the central nervous system against infection. But a new study by researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) shows that they also accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa. NEI is part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Eye Institute, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Joe Balintfy
neinews@nei.nih.gov
301-496-5248
NIH/National Eye Institute

Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
New England Journal of Medicine
Study of gene mutations in aplastic anemia may help optimize treament
Scientists have identified a group of genetic mutations in patients with aplastic anemia, which likely will help doctors optimize treatment for this rare and deadly blood condition. The study, appearing in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to tailor-made treatment plans for aplastic anemia patients as part of the emerging precision medicine movement. It is the largest study of its kind to examine gene mutations in aplastic anemia, the scientists note.

Contact: NHLBI Engagement and Media Relations Branch
nhlbi_news@nhlbi.nih.gov
301-496-4236
NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

Public Release: 1-Jul-2015
JAMA Psychiatry
Boys more likely to have antipsychotics prescribed, regardless of age
Boys are more likely than girls to receive a prescription for antipsychotic medication regardless of age, researchers have found. Approximately 1.5 percent of boys ages 10-18 received an antipsychotic prescription in 2010, although the percentage falls by nearly half after age 19. Among antipsychotic users with mental disorder diagnoses, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder was the most common among youth ages 1-18, depression was the most common diagnosis among young adults ages 19-24 receiving antipsychotics.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Michaelle Scanlon
NIMHpress@mail.nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Pediatrics
Umbilical cord 'milking' improves blood flow in preterm infants
A technique to increase the flow of blood from the umbilical cord into the infant's circulatory system improves blood pressure and red blood cell levels in preterm infants delivered by cesarean section, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Meredith Daly or Robert Bock
dalym@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
NIDA announces new awards for early stage investigators
The National Institute on Drug Abuse today announced the first six recipients of its two newly developed Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS and genetics or epigenetics research.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: NIDA Press Office
Media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Cell
NIAID-funded HIV vaccine research generates key antibodies in animal models
A trio of studies being published today in the journals Science and Cell describes advances toward the development of an HIV vaccine. The three study teams all demonstrated techniques for stimulating animal cells to produce antibodies that either could stop HIV from infecting human cells in the laboratory or had the potential to evolve into such antibodies. Each of the research teams received funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-Jun-2015
Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Researchers design placenta-on-a-chip to better understand pregnancy
National Institutes of Health researchers and their colleagues have developed a 'placenta-on-a-chip' to study the inner workings of the human placenta and its role in pregnancy. The device was designed to imitate, on a micro-level, the structure and function of the placenta and model the transfer of nutrients from mother to fetus. This prototype is one of the latest in a series of organ-on-a-chip technologies developed to accelerate biomedical advances.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital Research Fund, National Research Foundation of Korea, National Medical Center & Asan Medical Center in South Korea

Contact: Katie Rush
katie.rush@nih.gov
301-496-9066
NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Showing releases 1-25 out of 96.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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