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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

NIH Research News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 100.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 7-Oct-2014
JAMA
Candidate H7N9 avian flu vaccine works better with adjuvant
An experimental vaccine to protect people against H7N9 avian influenza prompted immune responses in 59 percent of volunteers who received two injections at the lowest dosage tested, but only if the vaccine was mixed with adjuvant -- substance that boosts the body's response to vaccination. Without adjuvant, immune responses produced by the investigational vaccine were minimal regardless of vaccine dosage, according to findings from a clinical trial sponsored by NIAID, part of NIH.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne A. Oplinger
aoplinger@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
HHS releases 13th Report on Carcinogens
Four substances have been added in the US Department of Health and Human Services 13th Report on Carcinogens, a science-based document that identifies chemical, biological, and physical agents that are considered cancer hazards for people living in the United States. The new report includes 243 listings.
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Toxicology Program

Contact: Robin Mackar
rmackar@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-0073
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
NIH awards 7 new vaccine adjuvant discovery contracts
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded seven research contracts to discover and characterize new adjuvants, or substances formulated as part of vaccines to enhance their protective ability.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
hillary.hoffman@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
NIH and VA address pain and related conditions in US military personnel and veterans
Thirteen research projects totaling approximately $21.7 million over five years will explore nondrug approaches to managing pain and related health conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder, drug abuse, and sleep issues. The effort seeks to enhance options for the management of pain and associated problems in US military personnel, veterans, and their families. NIH's NCCAM and NIDA and the US Department of Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Division provided funding for this initiative.
NIH/National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, US Department of Veterans Affairs/Health Services Research and Development Division

Contact: Katy Danielson
nccampress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-7790
NIH/National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
Emerging Infectious Diseases
NIH study supports camels as primary source of MERS-CoV transmission
NIH and Colorado State University scientists have provided experimental evidence supporting dromedary camels as the primary reservoir, or carrier, of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. The study, designed by scientists from CSU and NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, involved three healthy camels exposed through the eyes, nose and throat to MERS-CoV isolated from a patient. Each camel developed a mild upper respiratory tract infection consistent with what scientists have observed throughout the Middle East.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ken Pekoc
kpekoc@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 24-Sep-2014
NIH announces network to accelerate medicines for rheumatoid arthritis and lupus
The National Institutes of Health has awarded grants to 11 research groups across the United States to establish the Accelerating Medicines Partnership in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus Network.
National Institutes of Health, AbbVie, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck, Pfizer, Sanofi, Takeda, the Arthritis Foundation, the Lupus Foundation of America, the Lupus Research Institute/Alliance for Lupus Research, and the Rheumatology Research Foundation.

Contact: Trish Reynolds
reynoldsp2@mail.nih.gov
301-496-8190
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
NIH Pathways to Prevention Workshop: The Role of Opioids in the Treatment of Chronic Pain
NIH Pathways to Prevention Workshop: The Role of Opioids in the Treatment of Chronic Pain
The National Institutes of Health is convening a Pathways to Prevention workshop to assess the available scientific evidence on the long-term effectiveness and potential risks of opioids for treating chronic pain. Participants will be among the nation's top experts in the field of pain control and management from around the country, as well as key NIH scientists who focus on pain related research. An impartial, independent panel will identify research gaps and future research priorities.

Contact: Deborah Langer
langerdh@od.nih.gov
301-443-4569
NIH/Office of Disease Prevention

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
NIH funds next phase of Tissue Chip for Drug Screening program
The National Institutes of Health will award funds to support the next phase of its Tissue Chip for Drug Screening program to improve ways of predicting drug safety and effectiveness. Researchers will collaborate over three years to refine existing 3-D human tissue chips and combine them into an integrated system that can mimic the complex functions of the human body.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Geoff Spencer
spencerg@mail.nih.gov
301-435-0888
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
New supplemental awards apply sex and gender lens to NIH-funded research
The National Institutes of Health has awarded $10.1 million in supplemental funding to bolster the research of 82 grantees to explore the effects of sex in preclinical and clinical studies.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Anne Rancourt
anne.rancourt@nih.gov
301-451-7058
NIH/Office of the Director

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
NIH awards aim to improve understanding of cell pathways, development of new therapies
National Institutes of Health has awarded more than $64 million to six research institutions to create a database of human cellular responses, the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures. Discovering such cell responses will improve scientists' understanding of cell pathways and aid in the development of new therapies for many diseases.
NIH/Common Fund, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Steven Benowitz
steven.benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
NIH launches online database of international clinical research regulations
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) today launched ClinRegs, an online public database of country-specific clinical research regulatory information. The ClinRegs website, created and maintained by NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, enables users to explore and compare regulations across different countries.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
hillary.hoffman@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Molecular Psychiatry
Eating habits, body fat related to differences in brain chemistry
People who are obese may be more susceptible to environmental food cues than their lean counterparts due to differences in brain chemistry that make eating more habitual and less rewarding, according to a National Institutes of Health study published in Molecular Psychiatry.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Krysten Carrera
NIDDKMedia@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3583
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Nature Medicine
Rapid and durable protection against ebola virus with new vaccine regimens
One shot of an experimental vaccine made from two Ebola virus gene segments incorporated into a chimpanzee cold virus vector, called chimp adenovirus type 3 or ChAd3, protected all four macaque monkeys exposed to high levels of Ebola virus 5 weeks after inoculation, report National Institutes of Health scientists and their collaborators.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Nature
NIH-led scientists discover HIV antibody that binds to novel target on virus
An NIH-led team of scientists has discovered a new vulnerability in the armor of HIV that a vaccine, other preventive regimen or treatment could exploit. The site straddles two proteins, gp41 and gp120, that jut out of the virus and augments other known places where broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) bind to HIV. This newly identified site on the viral spike is where a new antibody found by the scientists in an HIV-infected person binds to the virus.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
NIH to Launch human safety study of Ebola vaccine candidate
Initial human testing of an investigational vaccine to prevent Ebola virus disease will begin next week by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. The early-stage trial will begin initial human testing of a vaccine co-developed by NIAID and GlaxoSmithKline and will evaluate the experimental vaccine's safety and ability to generate an immune system response in healthy adults. Testing will take place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Kathy Stover
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Scientists plug into a learning brain
Scientists explored the brain's capacity to learn and found learning is easier when it only requires nerve cells to rearrange existing patterns of activity than when the nerve cells have to generate new patterns.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
thomaschr@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature
Scientists looking across human, fly and worm genomes find shared biology
Researchers analyzing human, fly, and worm genomes have found that these species have a number of key genomic processes in common, reflecting their shared ancestry. The findings, appearing Aug. 28, 2014, in the journal Nature, offer insights into embryonic development, gene regulation and other biological processes vital to understanding human biology and disease.
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Steve Benowitz
steven.benowitz@nih.gov
301-451-8325
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 27-Aug-2014
Nature Genetics
NIH issues finalized policy on genomic data sharing
The National Institutes of Health has issued a final NIH Genomic Data Sharing policy to promote data sharing as a way to speed the translation of data into knowledge, products and procedures that improve health while protecting the privacy of research participants. The final policy was posted in the Federal Register Aug. 26, 2014 and published in the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts Aug. 27, 2014.

Contact: NIH Office of Communications
nihnmb@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5787
NIH/Office of the Director

Public Release: 26-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
HIV antibodies block infection by reservoir-derived virus in laboratory study
A laboratory study led by scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, lends further weight to the potential effectiveness of passive immunotherapy to suppress HIV in the absence of drug treatment.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
PLOS Pathogens
NIH scientists establish new monkey model of severe MERS-CoV disease
National Institutes of Health scientists have found that Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in marmosets closely mimics the severe pneumonia experienced by people infected with MERS-CoV, giving scientists the best animal model yet for testing potential treatments.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ken Pekoc
kpekoc@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
JAMA
Test reliably detects inherited immune deficiency in newborns
A newborn screening test for severe combined immunodeficiency reliably identifies infants with this life-threatening inherited condition, leading to prompt treatment and high survival rates, according to a study supported by the National Institutes of Health. Researchers led by Jennifer Puck, M.D., of the University of California, San Francisco, also found that SCID affects approximately 1 in 58,000 newborns, indicating that the disorder is less rare than previously thought.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
hillary.hoffman@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Monthly blood transfusions reduce sickle cell anemia-related brain injury in children
Regular blood transfusions prevent recurrent blockage of brain blood vessels, a serious neurological side effect that occurs in one third of children with sickle cell anemia, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The findings appear in the Aug. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 17-Aug-2014
Nature
Suspect gene corrupts neural connections
Researchers have demonstrated in patients' cells how a rare mutation in a suspect gene corrupts the turning on and off of dozens of other genes underlying synapses -- the connections between neurons. In a 'disease-in-a-dish' study, induced neurons of patients from families affected by a mutation associated with schizophrenia and other major mental illness expressed 80 percent lower-than-normal levels of a protein made by a suspect gene.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 15-Aug-2014
Follow that cell
The National Institutes of Health is challenging science innovators to compete for prizes totaling up to $500,000, by developing new ways to track the health status of a single cell in complex tissue over time. The NIH Follow that Cell Challenge seeks tools that would, for example, monitor a cell in the process of becoming cancerous, detect changes due to a disease-causing virus, or track how a cell responds to treatment.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 14-Aug-2014
JAIDS: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Scientists detail urgent research agenda to address chronic disease toll
According to recommendations resulting from a multidisciplinary conference sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, scientists and physicians in low- and middle-income countries should build on existing HIV research to study and treat chronic conditions.

Contact: Jeff Gray
Jeffrey.Gray@nih.gov
301-496-2075
NIH/Fogarty International Center

Showing releases 26-50 out of 100.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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