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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

NIH Research News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 78.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Durable end to AIDS will require HIV vaccine development
Broader global access to lifesaving antiretroviral therapies and wider implementation of proven HIV prevention strategies could potentially control and perhaps end the HIV/AIDS pandemic. However, a safe and at least moderately effective HIV vaccine is needed to reach this goal more expeditiously and in a more sustainable way, according to a new commentary from NIAID director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., and colleague Hilary D. Marston, M.D., M.P.H.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Durable end to AIDS will require HIV vaccine development
Broader global access to lifesaving antiretroviral therapies and wider implementation of proven HIV prevention strategies could potentially control and perhaps end the HIV/AIDS pandemic. However, a safe and at least moderately effective HIV vaccine is needed to reach this goal more expeditiously and in a more sustainable way.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 3-Feb-2014
AIDS
NIH study describes new method for tracking T cells in HIV patients
A team of researchers has reported a novel method for tracking CD4+ T cells in people infected with HIV. CD4+ T cells are critical for immune defense against an array of pathogens and are a primary target of HIV.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
linda.huynh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 3-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
NIH scientists find mechanism that helps HIV evade antibodies, stabilize key proteins
NIH scientists have discovered a mechanism involved in stabilizing key HIV proteins and thereby concealing sites where some of the most powerful HIV neutralizing antibodies bind, findings with potential implications for HIV vaccine research.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 3-Feb-2014
Carcinogenesis
NIH study offers insight into why cancer incidence increases with age
The accumulation of age-associated changes in a biochemical process that helps control genes may be responsible for some of the increased risk of cancer seen in older people, according to a National Institutes of Health study.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Robin Arnette
arnetter@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-5143
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 29-Jan-2014
Nature
TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets, similarities to several cancers
Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bladder cancer -- also known as urothelial carcinoma -- resemble subtypes of breast, head and neck and lung cancers, suggesting similar routes of development. The study is published online in Nature.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Daniels
john.daniels@nih.gov
301-402-0911
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 27-Jan-2014
Nature Medicine
NIH grantees develop way to make old antibiotic work against TB
Scientists supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, have developed a method to synthesize modified forms of an established antibiotic called spectinomycin. The modified forms, unlike the original drug, can act against tuberculosis bacteria. The new compounds overcome a pump mechanism that tuberculosis bacteria ordinarily use to expel standard spectinomycin and were highly effective when tested in mice with either acute or chronic tuberculosis infection.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne A. Oplinger
aoplinger@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 24-Jan-2014
Researchers launch Phase 1 clinical trial of potential MRSA treatment
Scientists have begun the first human clinical trial of EDP-788, an investigational oral antibiotic intended to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections. The Phase 1 trial, which will enroll as many as 64 healthy men and women ages 18 to 45, will evaluate the investigational drug's safety as well as how it is broken down and processed in the body.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Nalini Padmanabhan
padmanabhannm@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
New substance abuse treatment resources focus on teens
Resources to help parents, health care providers, and substance abuse treatment specialists treat teens struggling with drug abuse, as well as identify and interact with those who might be at risk, were released today by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). The release came before the start of National Drug Facts Week, an annual observance to educate teens about drug abuse. NIDA is part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: Press Office
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 23-Jan-2014
Cancer Discovery
NIH scientists map gene changes driving tumors in common pediatric soft-tissue cancer
Scientists have mapped the genetic changes that drive tumors in rhabdomyosarcoma, a pediatric soft-tissue cancer, and found that the disease is characterized by two distinct genotypes. The genetic alterations identified in this malignancy could be useful in developing targeted diagnostic tools and treatments for children with the disease. The study, by researchers at the National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, and their colleagues, appeared in the Jan. 23, 2014, issue of the journal Cancer Discovery.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: NCI Press Officers
ncipressofficers@mail.nih.gov
301-496-6641
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
PLOS Pathogens
NIH-created toxin can kill HIV-infected cells that persist despite treatment
A team including University of North Carolina and NIH scientists has demonstrated in a mouse model that an HIV-specific poison can kill cells in which the virus is actively reproducing despite antiretroviral therapy. According to the researchers, such a targeted poison could complement antiretroviral therapy, which dramatically reduces the replication of HIV in infected cells but does not eliminate them.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: aura S. Leifman
sivitzl@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 9-Jan-2014
Cell Reports
NIH-funded scientists develop mouse model for atopic dermatitis
A study reports the development of a new mouse model for atopic dermatitis, an inflammatory skin disorder commonly known as eczema. The findings, published in Cell Reports, suggest that mast cells, a type of immune cell, are critical for both spontaneous and allergen-induced eczema.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
linda.huynh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 3-Jan-2014
JAMA Psychiatry
Severe mental illness tied to higher rates of substance use
People with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder have a higher risk for substance use, especially cigarette smoking, and protective factors usually associated with lower rates of substance use do not exist in severe mental illness, according to a new study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: NIDA Press Office
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 1-Jan-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Drivers engaged in other tasks about 10 percent of the time
Drivers eat, reach for the phone, text, or otherwise take their eyes off the road about 10 percent of the time they are behind the wheel, according to a study using video technology and in-vehicle sensors.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Bock
bockr@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 23-Dec-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Testosterone-regulated genes may affect vaccine-induced immunity
A new study has identified a link between certain genes affected by testosterone and antibody responses to an influenza vaccine. The findings, published in PNAS, suggest that testosterone levels may partially explain why men often have weaker responses to vaccines than women. The study, led by researchers at Stanford University, was supported in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Press Office
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-Dec-2013
Nature
Animal vaccine study yields insights that may advance HIV vaccine research
A vaccine study in monkeys designed to identify measurable signs that the animals were protected from infection by SIV, the monkey version of HIV, as well as the mechanism of such protection has yielded numerous insights that may advance HIV vaccine research. Seven laboratories collaborated on the research led by Mario Roederer, Ph.D., and John R. Mascola, M.D., at the Vaccine Research Center of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-Dec-2013
Nature
Researchers identify genetic marker of resistance to key malaria drug
An international team of researchers has discovered a way to identify, at a molecular level, malaria-causing Plasmodium falciparum parasites that are resistant to artemisinin, the key drug for treating this disease. The research team, which included scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, published their findings today in the journal Nature.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Contact: Nalini Padmanabhan
padmanabhannm@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 17-Dec-2013
NIH program bridges gap to develop new therapeutics
The National Institutes of Health today has launched three pre-clinical projects to advance potential new treatments for acute radiation syndrome, brain injury following cardiac arrest and a rare blood disorder called beta thalassemia.
National Institutes of Health Common Fund

Contact: NCATS Office of Communications
info@ncats.nih.gov
301-435-0888
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)

Public Release: 16-Dec-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Dust in homes with dogs may protect against allergies, asthma
A new study suggests that exposure to dust from homes with dogs may alter the immune response to allergens and other asthma triggers by affecting the composition of the gut microbiome -- the community of microbes that naturally colonize the digestive tract.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 16-Dec-2013
NIH names leadership, research units for restructured HIV/AIDS
Principal investigators and clinical trials units (CTUs) have been chosen to lead and conduct the research of five HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks through 2021. The effort is directed and funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. Total funding for the networks' leadership and the CTUs is expected to reach $225 million in 2014, the first year of operation.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jennifer Routh
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 16-Dec-2013
Cancer
Lung cancer death rates continue to fall, helping the decrease in overall cancer death rates
The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, covering the period 1975, showed death rates for lung cancer, which accounts for more than one in four cancer deaths, dropping at a faster pace than in previous years.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: NCI Press Officers
ncipressofficers@mail.nih.gov
301-496-6641
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Public Release: 16-Dec-2013
NIH and NFL tackle concussion research
The National Institutes of Health has selected eight projects to receive support to answer some of the most fundamental problems on traumatic brain injury, including understanding long-term effects of repeated head injuries and improving diagnosis of concussions. Funding is provided by the Sports and Health Research Program, a partnership among the NIH, the National Football League, and the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 13-Dec-2013
Nature Communications
Study breaks blood-brain barriers to understanding Alzheimer's
A study in mice shows how a breakdown of the brain's blood vessels may amplify or cause problems associated with Alzheimer's disease. The results suggest that blood vessel cells called pericytes may provide novel targets for treatments and diagnoses.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute on Aging

Contact: Christopher G Thomas
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 12-Dec-2013
Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association
NIH study links family structure to high blood pressure in African-American men
In a study of African-American men, researchers from the National Institutes of Health found that boys who grew up in two-parent homes were less likely to have high blood pressure as adults compared to those raised by a single parent. Reported in the Dec. 12, 2013, issue of the journal Hypertension, this is the first study of an African-American population to document an association between childhood family living arrangements and blood pressure.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Raymond MacDougall
macdougallr@mail.nih.gov
301-443-3523
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 12-Dec-2013
Science
With new study, aquatic comb jelly floats into new evolutionary position
In a study that compares the genomes of aquatic life forms, researchers have found evidence to shuffle the branches of the tree of life. The cornerstone of the study, published in the Dec. 13, 2013, advance online issue of Science, is the researchers' sequencing, assembly, annotation and analysis of the genome of Mnemiopsis leidyi, a comb jelly native to the coastal waters of the western Atlantic Ocean.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Raymond MacDougall
macdougallr@mail.nih.gov
301-443-3523
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Showing releases 26-50 out of 78.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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