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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

NIH Research News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 77.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 12-Dec-2013
NIH network revolutionizes stroke clinical research
A network of 25 regional stroke centers working with nearby satellite facilities will span the country, have teams of researchers representing every medical specialty needed for stroke care and will address the three prongs of stroke research: prevention, treatment and recovery. The centers were announced today by the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Margo Warren
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 11-Dec-2013
Nature
Researchers discover common cell wall component in Chlamydia bacteria
Researchers studying Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria, which cause the sexually transmitted infection chlamydia as well as infectious blindness, have confirmed that the bacteria contain -- and, in fact, cannot function without -- the common molecule peptidoglycan, a structural component found in the cell wall of many bacteria. This finding puts an end to years of uncertainty about whether Chlamydia bacteria, like almost all bacterial species, rely on peptidoglycan to reproduce and to maintain their shape and structure.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Nalini Padmanabhan
padmanabhannm@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 11-Dec-2013
Gene-silencing data now publicly available to help scientists better understand disease
For the first time, large-scale information on the biochemical makeup of small interfering RNA molecules is available publicly. These molecules are used in research to help scientists better understand how genes function in disease. Making these data accessible to researchers worldwide increases the potential of finding new treatments for patients.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: NCATS Communications
info@ncats.nih.gov
301-435-0888
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)

Public Release: 10-Dec-2013
Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Stimulant-addicted patients can quit smoking without hindering treatment
Smokers who are addicted to cocaine or methamphetamine can quit smoking while being treated for their stimulant addiction, without interfering with stimulant addiction treatment. This is according to new research funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: NIDA Press Office
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 8-Dec-2013
Nature
Concussion secrets unveiled in mice and people
There is more than meets the eye following even a mild traumatic brain injury. While the brain may appear to be intact, new findings reported in Nature suggest that the brain's protective coverings may feel the brunt of the impact.

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 6-Dec-2013
Science
H7N9 influenza virus not adapted to efficient human-to-human transmission
The avian H7N9 influenza virus that emerged earlier this year in China is poorly adapted for sustained transmission between humans, suggesting that the current form of the virus is unlikely to cause a pandemic, according to a new study led by Ian A. Wilson, Ph.D., and James C. Paulson, Ph.D., of The Scripps Research Institute. The study, published in Science, was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, and other organizations.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Nalini Padmanabhan
padmanabhannm@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 5-Dec-2013
Cell
NIH-funded scientists describe how mosquitoes are attracted to humans
Scientists at the University of California, Riverside have shown that certain mosquito nerve cells, known as cpA neurons, cause mosquitoes to be attracted to humans by detecting exhaled carbon dioxide and odors emitted from human skin. Their findings, published Dec. 5 in the journal Cell, may have implications for the control of mosquitoes and the diseases they transmit. The study was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Nalini Padmanabhan
padmanabhannm@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 27-Nov-2013
Nature
NIH-funded scientists identify potential target for malaria drugs
Researchers have identified the protein in malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites that is inhibited by a newly discovered class of anti-malarial compounds known as imidazopyrazines. The protein, phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, is the first potential malaria drug target shown to be essential to all stages of the Plasmodium life cycle; imidazopyrazines impede its activity throughout this process.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Nalini Padmanabhan
padmanabhannm@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 24-Nov-2013
Nature
Gene-silencing study finds new targets for Parkinson's disease
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have used RNA interference technology to reveal dozens of genes which may represent new therapeutic targets for treating Parkinson's disease. The findings also may be relevant to several diseases caused by damage to mitochondria, the biological power plants found in cells throughout the body.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Contact: Christopher G Thomas
thomaschr@ninds.nih.gov
301-435-2264
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 21-Nov-2013
American Journal of Kidney Diseases
Growth more stunted in lower-income youth with kidney disease
Even with more prescriptions for growth hormone, children and adolescents with chronic kidney disease were less likely to grow to normal height ranges if they came from lower-income families, according to research funded by the National Institutes of Health. Results from the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children Study are published in the December issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases and online today at http://www.ajkd.org.
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Contact: Bill Polglase
NIDDKMedia@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3583
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Public Release: 21-Nov-2013
Cell
Researchers identify genomic variant associated with sun sensitivity, freckles
Researchers have identified a genomic variant strongly associated with sensitivity to the sun, brown hair, blue eyes -- and freckles. The study by an international team including researchers from the National Institutes of Health was reported in the Nov. 21, 2013, online edition of the journal Cell.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Raymond MacDougall
macdougallr@mail.nih.gov
301-443-3523
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 19-Nov-2013
PLOS Medicine
Researchers suggest China consider national flu vaccination plan with staggered timing
China should tailor its influenza vaccination strategies to account for its three distinct flu regions, according to the first comprehensive study of the country's flu patterns conducted by a research team of Chinese and American scientists.

Contact: Jeff Gray
Jeffrey.Gray@nih.gov
301-496-2075
NIH/Fogarty International Center

Public Release: 15-Nov-2013
Ophthalmology
NIH-funded study finds donor age not a factor in most corneal transplants
Ten years after a transplant, a cornea from a 71-year-old donor is likely to remain as healthy as a cornea from a donor half that age, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. Corneas from donors over age 71 perform slightly less well, but still remain healthy for the majority of transplant recipients after 10 years, the study found.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Jean Horrigan
neinews@nei.nih.gov
301-496-5248
NIH/National Eye Institute

Public Release: 13-Nov-2013
New England Journal of Medicine
NIH study finds low-intensity therapy for Burkitt lymphoma is highly effective
Adult patients with a type of cancer known as Burkitt lymphoma had excellent long-term survival rates--upwards of 90 percent--following treatment with low-intensity chemotherapy regimens, according to a new clinical trial finding.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: NCI Office of Media Relations
ncipressofficers@mail.nih.gov
301-496-6641
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Public Release: 9-Nov-2013
ASN Kidney Week 2013
New England Journal of Medicine
Gene hastens kidney disease progression in African-Americans
A gene variant common in African-Americans predicts that people with that gene who also have chronic kidney disease (CKD) are twice as likely to progress to kidney failure as African-Americans without the high-risk gene and white people with CKD. People with the high-risk gene also tend to lose kidney function at twice the rate of those without the gene, according to the research, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Contact: Bill Polglase
niddkmedia@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3583
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Public Release: 8-Nov-2013
NIH launches trial of investigational genital herpes vaccine
Researchers have launched an early-stage clinical trial of an investigational vaccine designed to prevent genital herpes disease. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, is sponsoring the Phase I trial, which is being conducted at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jennifer Routh
jennifer.routh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 6-Nov-2013
Nature
Earliest marker for autism found in young infants
Eye contact during early infancy may be a key to early identification of autism, according to a study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, part of the National Institutes of Health. Published this week in the journal Nature, the study reveals the earliest sign of developing autism ever observed--a steady decline in attention to others' eyes within the first two to six months of life.
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Keri Chiodo
NIMHPress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 31-Oct-2013
Science
NIH-funded scientists reveal structure of HIV protein key to cell entry
Using protein engineering and two different cutting-edge structural biology imaging techniques, researchers have developed a detailed picture of the protein largely responsible for enabling HIV to enter human immune cells and cause infection. An in-depth understanding of the atomic structure of the HIV envelope trimer -- or Env, the three-component protein found on HIV's surface -- is critical to better understanding how HIV gains entry into cells and for creating potential HIV vaccines.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 31-Oct-2013
Nature
HIV antibody infusions show promise for treating SHIV-infected monkeys
Two teams are reporting results from experiments in which they infused powerful anti-HIV antibodies into monkeys infected with an HIV-like virus, rapidly reducing the amount of virus, or viral load, to undetectable levels, where it remained for extended periods. One study was led by scientists at NIAID, part of NIH, and the other was led by NIAID grantees at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Both teams worked with monkeys infected with simian human immunodeficiency virus, or SHIV, which can cause AIDS in monkeys.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 31-Oct-2013
Science
NIH scientists develop candidate vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus
An experimental vaccine to protect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of illness and hospitalization among very young children, elicited high levels of RSV-specific antibodies when tested in animals, according to a report in the journal Science.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne A. Oplinger
aoplinger@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 27-Oct-2013
Nature Genetics
NIH-supported study identifies 11 new Alzheimer's disease risk genes
An international group of researchers has identified 11 new genes that offer important new insights into the disease pathways involved in Alzheimer's disease. The highly collaborative effort involved scanning the DNA of over 74,000 volunteers -- the largest genetic analysis yet conducted in Alzheimer's research -- to discover new genetic risk factors linked to late-onset Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of the disorder.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Peggy Vaughn
nianews3@mail.nih.gov
301-496-1752
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Public Release: 26-Oct-2013
Lancet
Novel medical treatment is more effective than brain stents for stroke prevention
Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and is often the result of blood vessel narrowing due to buildup of cholesterol in brain blood vessels. A new report, published in Lancet, details long-term outcomes of a study that compared aggressive medical therapy with surgically implanted stents to open narrowed brain blood vessels for the prevention of stroke.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Advances in Geroscience: Impact on Healthspan and Chronic Disease
NIH hosts national research summit on link between aging processes, chronic disease
"Advances in Geroscience: Impact on Healthspan and Chronic Disease" brings together 50 renowned investigators to examine how the basic biology of aging drives chronic disease. Aging is the single biggest risk factor for the development of non-genetic, chronic diseases; better understanding of this interplay is crfitical for progress. The meeting reflects the emergence of "geroscience," which features an integrated approach to the study of diseases and disability associated with aging.

Contact: Megan Homer
nianews3@mail.nih.gov
301-496-1752
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Public Release: 25-Oct-2013
Nature Biotechnology
New microscopes at NIH reveal live, developing cells in unprecedented 3-D clarity
Researchers at NIH have developed two new microscopes, both the first of their kind. The first captures small, fast moving organisms at an unprecedented rate and the second displays large cell samples in three dimensions while decreasing the amount of harmful light exposure to the cells.

Contact: Jessica Meade
nibibpress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3500
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering

Public Release: 24-Oct-2013
NIH funds development of novel robots to assist people with disabilities, aid doctors
Three projects have been awarded funding by the National Institutes of Health to develop innovative robots that work cooperatively with people and adapt to changing environments to improve human capabilities and enhance medical procedures. Funding for these projects totals approximately $2.4 million over the next five years, subject to the availability of funds.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Margot Kern
NIBIBPress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3500
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering

Showing releases 51-75 out of 77.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

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