NIH Director Page NIH Health Information Page NIH Impact NIH Fact Sheets NIH Social Media and Outreach
EurekAlert! - National Institutes of Health  
LINKS

Resources

 

NIH Main

 

NIH Research News

 

Funded News

 
  For News & Research
  NIH Videos
  eColumn: NIH Research Matters
  NIH News in Health
  NIH Fact Sheets
 
  Additional Resources
  NIH Home Page
 

About NIH

  NIH Health Information
  Pub Med
  MedlinePlus
  Clinical trials.gov
  More News and Events Sources
  NIH News and Events, Special Interest
 
  RSS Feed RSS Feed
  Back to EurekAlert!
 

 


Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

NIH Research News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 51-75 out of 97.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
NIH announces winners of 2014 Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Competition
Four winning teams were announced in the Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams challenge, a biomedical engineering design competition for teams of undergraduate students.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Jessica Meade
nibibpress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3500
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering

Public Release: 13-Aug-2014
Nature
NIH-led scientists boost potential of passive immunization against HIV
Scientists are pursuing injections or intravenous infusions of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies (bNAbs) as a strategy for preventing HIV infection. This technique, called passive immunization, has been shown to protect monkeys from a monkey form of HIV called simian human immunodeficiency virus, or SHIV. To make passive immunization a widely feasible HIV prevention option for people, scientists want to modify bNAbs such that a modest amount of them is needed only once every few months.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 11-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bioengineers create functional 3-D brain-like tissue
Bioengineers have created three-dimensional brain-like tissue that functions like and has structural features similar to tissue in the rat brain and that can be kept alive in the lab for more than two months. The tissue could provide a superior model for studying normal brain function as well as injury and disease, and could assist in the development of new treatments for brain dysfunction.
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Contact: Margot Kern
nibibpress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3500
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering

Public Release: 6-Aug-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
NIH and Italian scientists develop nasal test for human prion disease
A nasal brush test can rapidly and accurately diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, an incurable and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder, according to a study by National Institutes of Health scientists and their Italian colleagues.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ken Pekoc
kpekoc@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 5-Aug-2014
PLOS Medicine
Year-round preventive treatment reduces malaria risk in young children
A year-round preventive drug treatment substantially reduces young children's risk of contracting malaria and poses no serious risk of adverse events, according to a study by researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health.The findings demonstrate that prolonged treatment given from six to 24 months of age is safe and effective for young children, according to the study authors.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Robert Bock or Meredith Daly
dalym@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Resistance to key malaria drug spreading at alarming rate in Southeast Asia
Resistance to artemisinin, the main drug to treat malaria, is now widespread throughout Southeast Asia, among the Plasmodium falciparum parasites that cause the disease and is likely caused by a genetic mutation in the parasites. However, a six-day course of artemisinin-based combination therapy -- as opposed to a standard three-day course -- has proved highly effective in treating drug-resistant malaria cases, according to findings published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jennifer Routh
jennifer.routh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Academic Medicine
Journal supplement details progress in African medical education
In the first substantial publication by participants of the $130 million Medical Education Partnership Initiative, more than 225 authors detailed progress made at African institutions in a 116-page supplement being published today by the journal Academic Medicine. The collection of 32 articles includes case studies of national strategies to increase numbers of doctors and health professionals trained; educational innovations such as e-learning; research capacity development; and partnerships that leverage advances across the MEPI network.
The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jeff Gray
jeffrey.gray@nih.gov
301-496-2075
NIH/Fogarty International Center

Public Release: 27-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
NIH scientists find 6 new genetic risk factors for Parkinson's
Using data from over 18,000 patients, scientists have identified more than two dozen genetic risk factors involved in Parkinson's disease, including six that had not been previously reported. The study, published in Nature Genetics, was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health and led by scientists working in NIH laboratories.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 23-Jul-2014
NIBIB Edward C. Nagy New Investigator Symposium
NIBIB to host second Edward C. Nagy New Investigator Symposium
The National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering will host its second Edward C. Nagy New Investigator Symposium on July 30, 2014, on the NIH campus. There will be ten exciting presentations from recent new investigators covering a wide breadth of NIBIB-funded research.

Contact: Margot Kern
nibibpress@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3500
NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging & Bioengineering

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature
NIH-supported scientists demonstrate very early formation of SIV reservoir
Scientists have generally believed that HIV and its monkey equivalent, SIV, gain a permanent foothold in the body very early after infection, making it difficult to completely eliminate the virus even after antiretroviral therapy has controlled it. Now NIH-supported researchers report that SIV can become entrenched in tissues fewer than three days after infection, before the virus is detectable in blood plasma or blood cells.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature
Schizophrenia's genetic 'skyline' rising
The largest genomic dragnet of any psychiatric disorder to date has unmasked 108 chromosomal sites harboring inherited variations in the genetic code linked to schizophrenia, 83 of which had not been previously reported. By contrast, the 'skyline' of such suspect variants associated with the disorder contained only 5 significant peaks in 2011. Researchers combined data from all available schizophrenia genetic samples to boost statistical power high enough to detect subtle effects on risk.
National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism
Most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches. Heritability also outweighed other risk factors in this largest study of its kind to date. About 52 percent of the risk for autism was traced to common and rare inherited variation, with spontaneous mutations contributing a modest 2.6 percent of the total risk.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Gastroenterology
High-dose fluticasone effective against eosinophilic esophagitis
Results from a clinical trial show that high doses of the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate safely and effectively induce remission in many people with eosinophilic esophagitis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus characterized by high levels of white blood cells called eosinophils. However, some trial participants did not respond to fluticasone even after six months of high-dose treatments, providing evidence that certain people with eosinophilic esophagitis are steroid-resistant.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
hillary.hoffman@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
NIH system to monitor emerging drug trends
An innovative National Drug Early Warning System is being developed to monitor emerging trends that will help health experts respond quickly to potential outbreaks of illicit drugs such as heroin and to identify increased use of designer synthetic compounds. The system will scan social media and Web platforms to identify new trends as well as use conventional national- and local-level data resources.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: NIDA Press Team
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
NIH scientists identify gene linked to fatal inflammatory disease in children
Investigators have identified a gene that underlies a very rare but devastating autoinflammatory condition in children. Several existing drugs have shown therapeutic potential in laboratory studies, and one is currently being studied in children with the disease, which the researchers named STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy. The findings appeared online today in the New England Journal of Medicine. The research was done at the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Contact: Trish Reynolds
reynoldsp2@mail.nih.gov
301-496-8190
NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

Public Release: 14-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Scientists deepen genetic understanding of eosinophilic esophagitis
Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health have identified genetic markers associated with eosinophilic esophagitis, an inflammatory disease characterized by high levels of immune cells called eosinophils in the esophagus. Their findings suggest that several genes are involved in the development of EoE, which can cause difficulty eating and often is associated with food allergies. The findings also may help explain why the disease specifically affects the esophagus.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
hillary.hoffman@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
'Mississippi Baby' now has detectable HIV, researchers find
The child known as the 'Mississippi baby' -- an infant seemingly cured of HIV that was reported as a case study of a prolonged remission of HIV infection in the New England Journal of Medicine last fall -- now has detectable levels of HIV after more than two years of not taking antiretroviral therapy without evidence of virus, according to the pediatric HIV specialist and researchers involved in the case.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Kathy Stover
kathy.stover@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Nature
Study identifies novel genomic changes in the most common type of lung cancer
Researchers from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have identified novel mutations in a well-known cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Contact: Press Office
ncipressofficers@mail.nih.gov
301-496-6641
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
NIH launches Phase I clinical trial of novel drug to treat Clostridium difficile infection
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched an early-stage clinical trial of CRS3123, an investigational oral antibiotic intended to treat Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection. CRS3123 (previously known as REP3123) is a narrow-spectrum agent that inhibits C. difficile growth while sparing normal intestinal bacteria.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jennifer Routh
jennifer.routh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
First drug candidate from NIH program acquired by biopharmaceutical company
A drug candidate developed by researchers at the NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences and its collaborators to treat sickle cell disease has been acquired by Baxter International's BioScience business. The drug candidate, Aes-103, is the first specifically developed to target the underlying molecular mechanism of sickle cell disease. Baxter now will advance the clinical development activities required for regulatory approval and commercialization.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: NCATS Office of Communications
spencerg@mail.nih.gov
301-435-0888
NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Ophthalmology
Rehabilitation helps prevent depression from age-related vision loss
Depression is a common risk for people who have lost their vision from age-related macular degeneration, but a new study shows that a type of rehabilitation therapy can cut this risk in half. The study was funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Jean Horrigan
neinews@nei.nih.gov
301-496-5248
NIH/National Eye Institute

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
PLOS Medicine
NCI study finds extreme obesity may shorten life expectancy up to 14 years
Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a young age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to results of an analysis of data pooled from 20 large studies of people from three countries.
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Contact: NCI Press Officers
ncipressofficers@mail.nih.gov
301-496-6641
NIH/National Cancer Institute

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Brain tumor invasion along blood vessels may lead to new cancer treatments
Invading glioblastoma cells may hijack cerebral blood vessels during early stages of disease progression and damage the brain's protective barrier, a study in mice indicates. This finding could ultimately lead to new ways to bring about the death of the tumor, as therapies may be able to reach these deadly cells at an earlier time point than was previously thought possible.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Archives of Toxicology
Low doses of arsenic cause cancer in male mice
Mice exposed to low doses of arsenic in drinking water, similar to what some people might consume, developed lung cancer, researchers at the National Institutes of Health have found.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Robin Mackar
rmackar@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-0073
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
NIH funds next step of cutting-edge research into Alzheimer's disease genome
Teams of scientists will use support from the NIH to conduct research into the genetic underpinnings of Alzheimer's disease, analyzing how genome sequences may contribute to increased risk or protect against the disease. The NIH awarded grants for using innovative new technologies and computational methods for the analysis. The scientists also will seek insights into why some people with known risks do not develop the disease.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Human Genome Research Instiutute, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Peggy Vaughn
nianews3@mail.nih.gov
301-496-1752
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Showing releases 51-75 out of 97.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 > >>

     
   

HOME    DISCLAIMER    PRIVACY POLICY    CONTACT US
Copyright ©2014 by AAAS, the science society.