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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

NIH Research News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-92 out of 92.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Public Release: 19-Mar-2014
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Scientists describe gut bacteria that cause sepsis in preterm infants
Researchers studying intestinal bacteria in newborns have characterized the gut bacteria of premature infants who go on to develop sepsis, a serious and potentially life-threatening condition caused by bacteria in the bloodstream. Their findings suggest new strategies for the early detection and prevention of severe bloodstream infections.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 18-Mar-2014
International Symposium on Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine
New England Journal of Medicine
Sepsis study comparing 3 treatment methods shows same survival rate
A five-year, randomized clinical trial at 31 academic hospitals showed that survival of patients with septic shock was the same regardless of whether they received treatment based on specific protocols or the usual high-level of care. Sepsis affects more than 800,000 Americans annually, is the ninth leading cause of disease-related deaths and is the most expensive condition treated in US hospitals, costing more than $20 billion per year.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Alisa Zapp Machalek
alisa.machalek@nih.gov
301-496-7301
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Public Release: 17-Mar-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
NIH scientists track evolution of a superbug
Using genome sequencing, National Institutes of Health scientists and their colleagues have tracked the evolution of the antibiotic-resistant bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 258 (ST258), an important agent of hospital-acquired infections. While researchers had previously thought that ST258 K. pneumoniae strains spread from a single ancestor, the NIH team showed that the strains arose from at least two different lineages.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ken Pekoc
kpekoc@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 11-Mar-2014
JAMA
Two surgeries for pelvic prolapse found similarly effective, safe
Two surgical treatments for a form of pelvic hernia affecting women have similar rates of success and safety, scientists in a National Institutes of Health research network have found. A guided exercise therapy to strengthen pelvic muscles did not add to the benefits of either surgery.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Bock
bockr@mail.nih.gov
301-496-5133
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 6-Mar-2014
JAMA Ophthalmology
Contacts better than permanent lenses for babies after cataract surgery
For adults and children who undergo cataract surgery, implantation of an artificial lens is the standard of care. But a clinical trial suggests that for most infants, surgery followed by the use of contact lenses for several years -- and an eventual lens implant -- may be the better solution. The trial was funded in part by the National Eye Institute.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Jean Horrigan
neinews@nei.nih.gov
301-496-5248
NIH/National Eye Institute

Public Release: 5-Mar-2014
Nature
3-D changes in DNA may lead to a genetic form of Lou Gehrig's disease
New findings reveal how a mutation, a change in the genetic code that causes neurodegeneration, alters the shape of DNA, making cells more vulnerable to stress and more likely to die.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 4-Mar-2014
Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology
Prevalence of allergies the same, regardless of where you live
In the largest, most comprehensive, nationwide study to examine the prevalence of allergies from early childhood to old age, scientists from the National Institutes of Health report that allergy prevalence is the same across different regions of the United States, except in children 5 years and younger.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Robin Arnette
arnetter@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-5143
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Public Release: 3-Mar-2014
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
NIH team identifies new genetic syndrome
Researchers at NIH have identified a new genetic syndrome characterized by a constellation of health problems, including severe allergy, immune deficiency, autoimmunity and motor and neurocognitive impairment. The researchers, led by scientists NIAID, observed that the syndrome's diverse symptoms are the result of mutations in a single gene associated with sugar metabolism.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Hillary Hoffman
hillary.hoffman@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 2-Mar-2014
Nature
Study of antibody evolution charts course toward HIV vaccine
In an advance for HIV vaccine research, a scientific team has discovered how the immune system makes a powerful antibody that blocks HIV infection of cells by targeting a site on the virus called V1V2.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
aura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 19-Feb-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
NIH team discovers genetic disorder causing strokes and vascular inflammation in children
National Institutes of Health researchers have identified gene variants that cause a rare syndrome of sporadic fevers, skin rashes and recurring strokes, beginning early in childhood. The team's discovery coincides with findings by an Israeli research group that identified an overlapping set of variants of the same gene in patients with a similar type of blood vessel inflammation.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Raymond MacDougall
macdougallr@mail.nih.gov
301-443-3523
NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

Public Release: 12-Feb-2014
Clinical Infectious Diseases
Test for persistent Lyme infection using live ticks shown safe in clinical study
In a first-of-its-kind study for Lyme disease, researchers have used live, disease-free ticks to see if Lyme disease bacteria can be detected in people who continue to experience symptoms such as fatigue or arthritis after completing antibiotic therapy.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne A. Oplinger
aoplinger@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 11-Feb-2014
Nature Medicine
NIH-funded researchers use antibody treatment to protect humanized mice from HIV
NIH-funded scientists have shown that boosting the production of certain broadly neutralizing antibodies can protect humanized mice from both intravenous and vaginal infection with HIV. Humanized mice have immune systems genetically modified to resemble those of humans, making it possible for them to become HIV-infected.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Nalini Padmanabhan
padmanabhannm@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Durable end to AIDS will require HIV vaccine development
Broader global access to lifesaving antiretroviral therapies and wider implementation of proven HIV prevention strategies could potentially control and perhaps end the HIV/AIDS pandemic. However, a safe and at least moderately effective HIV vaccine is needed to reach this goal more expeditiously and in a more sustainable way, according to a new commentary from NIAID director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., and colleague Hilary D. Marston, M.D., M.P.H.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 5-Feb-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Durable end to AIDS will require HIV vaccine development
Broader global access to lifesaving antiretroviral therapies and wider implementation of proven HIV prevention strategies could potentially control and perhaps end the HIV/AIDS pandemic. However, a safe and at least moderately effective HIV vaccine is needed to reach this goal more expeditiously and in a more sustainable way.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: NIAID Office of Communications
niaidnews@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 3-Feb-2014
AIDS
NIH study describes new method for tracking T cells in HIV patients
A team of researchers has reported a novel method for tracking CD4+ T cells in people infected with HIV. CD4+ T cells are critical for immune defense against an array of pathogens and are a primary target of HIV.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
linda.huynh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 3-Feb-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
NIH scientists find mechanism that helps HIV evade antibodies, stabilize key proteins
NIH scientists have discovered a mechanism involved in stabilizing key HIV proteins and thereby concealing sites where some of the most powerful HIV neutralizing antibodies bind, findings with potential implications for HIV vaccine research.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 3-Feb-2014
Carcinogenesis
NIH study offers insight into why cancer incidence increases with age
The accumulation of age-associated changes in a biochemical process that helps control genes may be responsible for some of the increased risk of cancer seen in older people, according to a National Institutes of Health study.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Robin Arnette
arnetter@niehs.nih.gov
919-541-5143
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Showing releases 76-92 out of 92.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

     
   

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