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Department of Health and Human Services

News from the National Institutes of Health

NIH Research News


Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 76-100 out of 103.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

Public Release: 15-Jun-2014
American Diabetes Association's 74th Scientific Sessions
New England Journal of Medicine
Bionic pancreas outperforms insulin pump in adults, youth
People with type 1 diabetes who used a bionic pancreas instead of manually monitoring glucose using fingerstick tests and delivering insulin using a pump were more likely to have blood glucose levels consistently within the normal range, with fewer dangerous lows or highs. The full report of the findings, funded by the National Institutes of Health, can be found online June 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Contact: Amy F. Reiter
NIDDKMedia@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3583
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Public Release: 13-Jun-2014
Cell
NIH scientists take totally tubular journey through brain cells
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health took a molecular-level journey into microtubules, the hollow cylinders inside brain cells that act as skeletons and internal highways, and watched how a protein called tubulin acetyltransferase (TAT) labels the inside of microtubules. The results answer long-standing questions about how TAT tagging works and offer clues as to why it is important for brain health.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
thomaschr@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 11-Jun-2014
Solving the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health: Partnerships for Research & Practice
Grand challenge: Top cause of disability years worldwide
More than 200 experts from 31 countries are meeting June 12-13, 2014 to grapple with the leading cause of years lived with disability worldwide – mental disorders. 'Solving the Grand Challenges in Global Mental: Partnerships for Research & Practice,' is being convened by the National Institute of Mental Health, part of the National Institutes of Health, and Grand Challenges Canada.

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-3536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 6-Jun-2014
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Early exposure to certain bacteria may protect toddlers from wheezing
Research funded by the National Institutes of Health suggests that exposure to specific combinations of allergens and bacteria within the first year of life may protect children from wheezing and allergic disease. These observations come from the Urban Environment and Childhood Asthma study, which aims to identify factors responsible for asthma development in children from inner-city settings, where the disease is more prevalent and severe.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Linda Huynh
linda.huynh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 5-Jun-2014
Neuron
Making artificial vision look more natural
In laboratory tests, researchers have used electrical stimulation of retinal cells to produce the same patterns of activity that occur when the retina sees a moving object. Although more work remains, this is a step toward restoring natural, high-fidelity vision to blind people, the researchers say. The work was funded in part by the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Eye Institute

Contact: Jean Horrigan
neinews@nei.nih.gov
301-496-5248
NIH/National Eye Institute

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
NIDA review summarizes research on marijuana's negative health effects
The current state of science on the adverse health effects of marijuana use links the drug to several significant adverse effects including addiction, a review reports. The article, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, is authored by scientists from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: NIDA Press Team
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
NIH, PCORI announce major award to prevent falls injuries in older people
The National Institutes of Health and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) have joined to support a clinical trial to test individually tailored interventions to prevent fall-related injuries. The award, made by the National Institute on Aging of the NIH and funded by PCORI as part of the Falls Injuries Prevention Partnership of the two organizations, is expected to total some $30 million over the five-year project.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute

Contact: Barbara Cire
nianews3@nih.gov
301-496-1752
NIH/National Institute on Aging

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Journal of Neuroscience
MDMA can be fatal in warm environments
A moderate dose of MDMA, commonly known as Ecstasy or Molly, that is typically nonfatal in cool, quiet environments can be lethal in rats exposed to conditions that mimic the hot, crowded, social settings where the drug is often used by people, a study finds. Scientists have identified the therapeutically-relevant cooling mechanism to enable effective interventions when faced with MDMA-induced hyperthermia. The study, publishing tomorrow in the Journal of Neuroscience, was conducted by researchers at the NIDA IRP.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse Intramural Research Program

Contact: NIDA Press Office
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Scientists uncover features of antibody-producing cells in people infected with HIV
By analyzing the blood of almost 100 treated and untreated HIV-infected volunteers, a team of scientists has identified previously unknown characteristics of B cells in the context of HIV infection. B cells are the immune system cells that make antibodies to HIV and other pathogens. The findings augment the current understanding of how HIV disease develops and have implications for the timing of treatment.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Laura S. Leifman
laura.sivitz@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 1-Jun-2014
Nature
Shining a light on memory
Using a flash of light, scientists have inactivated and then reactivated a memory in genetically engineered rats. The study, supported by the National Institutes of Health, is the first cause-and-effect evidence that strengthened connections between neurons are the stuff of memory. The findings add to mounting evidence that the brain represents a memory by forming assemblies of neurons with strengthened connections, or synapses.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jules Asher
NIMHpress@nih.gov
301-443-4536
NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Public Release: 22-May-2014
Science
Scientists identify potential vaccine candidate for pediatric malaria
Researchers have identified a substance, or antigen, that generates antibodies that can hinder the ability of malaria parasites to multiply, which may protect against severe malaria infection. The antigen, known as PfSEA-1, was associated with reduced parasite levels among children and adults in malaria-endemic areas.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Jennifer Routh
jennifer.routh@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 21-May-2014
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
NIH Pain Consortium's first pain care curriculum improves clinical skills
An online training module designed for the evaluation and care of chronic pain greatly improved medical student clinical skills, according to a report in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The module, built by the University of Pittsburgh and using an elderly woman with chronic lower back pain as a case study, is the first curriculum resource created through the efforts of the NIH CoEPEs.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: NIDA Press Office
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Screen of existing drugs finds compounds active against MERS coronavirus
Clinicians treating patients suffering from Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) currently have no drugs specifically targeted to the MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV), a virus first detected in humans in 2012. To address the urgent need for therapies, researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health screened a set of 290 compounds already approved by the US Food and Drug Administration or far advanced in clinical development for other indications to determine if any might also show potential for working against MERS-CoV.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne A. Oplinger
aoplinger@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 20-May-2014
NIDA offers tools for talking to teens about marijuana
Two updated booklets about marijuana for teens and their parents will help families sort out marijuana myths from science-based facts. The revamped tools come from NIDA. These booklets are being released during SAMHSA's National Prevention Week 2014.

Contact: NIDA Press Office
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Nature Communications
NIH researchers discover key factor in early auditory system development
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have uncovered a molecule in an animal model that acts as a key player in establishing the organization of the auditory system. The molecule, a protein known as Bmp7, is produced during embryonic development and acts to help sensory cells find their ultimate position on the tonotopic map, which is the fundamental principle of organization in the auditory system.
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Contact: Robert Miranda-Acevedo
miranda1@nidcd.nih.gov
301-496-7243
NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Public Release: 20-May-2014
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
NIH study links high cholesterol levels to lower fertility
High cholesterol levels may impair fertility in couples trying to achieve a pregnancy, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health, the University at Buffalo, and Emory University in Atlanta.
National Institutes of Health

Contact: Robert Bock or Meredith Daly
301-496-5133
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Public Release: 19-May-2014
2014 Avant-Garde Awards focus on strengthening the immune system
With proposals ranging from enhancing the immune system's ability to fight HIV infection to improving long-term immune health in HIV-infected drug users, three scientists have been chosen to receive the 2014 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research from NIDA.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: NIDA Press Office
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 16-May-2014
Study of third hand nicotine from e-cigarette exposure wins NIH Addiction Science Award
An exploration of third hand nicotine exposure from e-cigarettes was given the top Addiction Science Award at the 2014 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair -- the world's largest science competition for high school students. The awards are coordinated by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health, and Friends of NIDA, a coalition that supports NIDA's mission.
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Contact: NIDA Press Team
media@nida.nih.gov
301-443-6245
NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse

Public Release: 14-May-2014
NIH takes action on sex/gender in cell and animal studies
NIH leadership is available to answer questions from reporters about new policies that will be published online Wednesday in Nature to ensure that sex is treated as a fundamental variable in the preclinical biomedical research that it funds.

Contact: Anne Rancourt
anne.rancourt@nih.gov
301-451-7058
NIH/Office of the Director

Public Release: 9-May-2014
Cell Reports
Longevity gene may boost brain power
Scientists showed that people who have a variant of a longevity gene, called KLOTHO, have improved brain skills such as thinking, learning and memory regardless of their age, sex, or whether they have a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Increasing KLOTHO gene levels in mice made them smarter, possibly by increasing the strength of connections between nerve cells in the brain. The study was partly funded by the National Institutes of Health.
NIH/National Institute on Aging, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, S.D. Bechtel Jr., Coulter-Weeks, Metlife Foundations, American Federation for Aging

Contact: Christopher G. Thomas
thomaschr@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Public Release: 7-May-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Malaria severity not determined solely by parasite levels in blood
Although malaria kills some 600,000 African children each year, most cases of the mosquito-borne parasitic disease in children are mild. Repeated infection does generate some immunity, and episodes of severe malaria are unusual once a child reaches age 5. However, the relative contributions of such factors as the level of malaria-causing parasites in a person's blood -- parasite density -- to disease severity and to development of protective immunity are not well understood.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Anne A. Oplinger
aoplinger@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 7-May-2014
New England Journal of Medicine
Recent Ebola outbreak highlights need for better global response
In an invited perspective article on the Ebola outbreak under way in West Africa, Heinz Feldmann, M.D., Ph.D., of the National Institutes of Health emphasizes the need for scientists to make their data available to colleagues in real-time to improve the public health response to outbreaks. He cites past responses to influenza and SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) outbreaks as successful examples of global information sharing.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Contact: Ken Pekoc
kpekoc@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Public Release: 4-May-2014
Pediatric Academic Societies and Asian Society for Pediatric Research Joint Meeting
New England Journal of Medicine
Drug pair cuts children's urinary infections up to 80 percent
Long-term use of a drug combination reduces the risk of recurrent urinary tract infection by up to 80 percent in children with the urinary condition vesicoureteral reflux compared to placebo, according to research funded by the National Institutes of Health. Results were published online May 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Contact: Bill Polglase
NIDDKMedia@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3583
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Public Release: 3-May-2014
Pediatric Academic Societies and Asian Society for Pediatric Research Joint Meeting
JAMA
Steroids after surgery do not help infants with rare liver disease
Infants with biliary atresia -- a rare liver disease -- did not benefit from corticosteroid treatment after bile duct surgery and could face more harm, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. Results were published online May 3 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting.

Contact: Leslie Curtis
NIDDKMedia@mail.nih.gov
301-496-3583
NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting
Preliminary results show improvement in MS symptoms
Combining the estrogen hormone estriol with Copaxone, a drug indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, may improve symptoms in patients with the disorder, according to preliminary results from a clinical study of 158 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. The findings were presented today by Rhonda Voskuhl, M.D., from the University of California, Los Angeles, at the American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting in Philadelphia.
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Multiple Sclerosis Society

Contact: Barbara McMakin
nindspressteam@ninds.nih.gov
301-496-5751
NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Showing releases 76-100 out of 103.

<< < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

     
   

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