National Science Foundation
Search NSF News:
NSF Main
NSF News
NSF Funded Research News
 
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 
At nsf.gov
Contacts Page
Multimedia Gallery
Media Advisories
Publications
Special Reports
Awards Search
Science & Engineering Stats
NSF & Congress
About NSF
RSS Feed RSS Feed
Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 837.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 ]

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Nature Geoscience
Icelandic volcano sits on massive magma hot spot
New research from University of California Davis and Aarhus University in Denmark shows that high mantle temperatures miles beneath the Earth's surface are essential for generating large amounts of magma. In fact, the scientists found that Iceland's Bardarbunga volcano lies directly above the hottest portion of the North Atlantic mantle plume.
National Science Foundation, Danish National Research Foundation

Contact: Charles Lesher
celesher@ucdavis.edu
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Biomacromolecules
NYU researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber
Researchers have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their work has taken place on the nanoscale. For the first time, this achievement has been realized on the microscale -- a leap of magnitude in size that presents significant new opportunities for using engineered protein fibers.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Lucky star escapes black hole with minor damage
Astronomers have gotten the closest look yet at what happens when a black hole takes a bite out of a star -- and the star lives to tell the tale.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Birds roosting in large groups less likely to contract West Nile virus
A University of Illinois study found that when large groups of birds roost together the chances that an individual bird will get bitten by mosquitoes carrying West Nile virus and subsequently contract the disease actually go down.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Debra Levey Larson
dlarson@illinois.edu
217-244-2880
University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Florida lizards evolve rapidly, within 15 years and 20 generations
Scientists working on islands in Florida have documented the rapid evolution of a native lizard species -- in as little as 15 years -- as a result of pressure from an invading lizard species, introduced from Cuba.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Christine Sinatra
christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu
512-853-0506
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Child Development
Two days later: Adolescents' conflicts with family spill over to school, vice versa
Family conflict and problems at school tend to occur together on the same day. A new study has found that these problems spill over in both directions for up to two days after. The study found that teens with more pronounced mental health symptoms, anxiety and depression, for example, are at risk for intensified spillover. The study followed over a hundred 13 to 17 year olds and their parents over a 14-day period.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Science
Highest altitude ice age human occupation documented in Peruvian Andes
In the southern Peruvian Andes, an archaeological team led by researchers at the University of Maine has documented the highest altitude ice age human occupation anywhere in the world -- nearly 4,500 meters above sea level.
Dan and Betty Churchill Exploration Fund, National Geographic Society/Waitt Grants Program, National Science Foundation

Contact: Margaret Nagle
nagle@maine.edu
207-581-3745
University of Maine

Public Release: 22-Oct-2014
Neuron
Human skin cells reprogrammed directly into brain cells
Scientists have described a way to convert human skin cells directly into a specific type of brain cell affected by Huntington's disease, an ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Unlike other techniques that turn one cell type into another, this new process does not pass through a stem cell phase, avoiding the production of multiple cell types, report researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Mallinckrodt Jr. Foundation, Ellison Medical Foundation, Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineer

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
UT Arlington researcher's device could detect vapors in environment or a person's breath
A University of Texas at Arlington researcher has received a three-year, $400,369 National Science Foundation grant to build a handheld device that could analyze a person's breath to reveal whether certain dangerous gasses are present that need more immediate medical attention.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
2014 IMBES Conference
UT Arlington to host international gathering of mind, brain and education experts
University of Texas at Arlington prepares for major role in international gathering of mind, brain and education experts.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology
When the isthmus is an island: Madison's hottest, and coldest, spots
In a new study published this month in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers highlight the urban heat island effect in Madison: the city's concentrated asphalt, brick and concrete lead to higher temperatures than its nonurban surroundings.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jason Schatz
jschatz2@wisc.edu
608-263-1859
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes
University of Oregon chemists have devised a way to see the internal structures of electronic waves trapped in carbon nanotubes by external electrostatic charges.
National Science Foundation, Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Space Weather
UNH scientist: Cosmic rays threaten future deep-space astronaut missions
Crewed missions to Mars remain an essential goal for NASA, but scientists are only now beginning to understand and characterize the radiation hazards that could make such ventures risky, concludes a new paper by University of New Hampshire scientists.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Sims
david.sims@unh.edu
603-862-5369
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Perceived hatred fuels conflicts between Democrats and Republicans, Israelis and Palestinians
A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academic of Sciences by a team of researchers from The New School for Social Research, Northwestern University and Boston College demonstrates how seemingly unsolvable political and ethnic conflicts are fueled by asymmetrical perceptions of opponents' motivations -- and that these tensions can be relieved by providing financial incentives to better understand what drives an adversary group.
Northwestern University, Boston College, Dispute Resolution Research Center at Kellogg School of Management, National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Sam Biederman
sam.biederman@newschool.edu
212-229-5667 x3094
The New School

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Monthly Notices of Royal Astronomical Society
Big black holes can block new stars
Massive black holes spewing out radio-frequency-emitting particles at near-light speed can block formation of new stars in aging galaxies, a study has found.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dennis O'Shea
dro@jhu.edu
443-997-9912
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 21-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal
POLARBEAR detects B-modes in the cosmic microwave background
The POLARBEAR experiment has made the most sensitive and precise measurements yet of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background and found telling twists called B-modes in the patterns, signs that this cosmic backlight has been warped by intervening structures in the universe.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Journal of Behavioral Decision Making
A child's poor decision-making skills can predict later behavior problems, research shows
Children who show poor decision-making skills at age 10 or 11 may be more likely to experience interpersonal and behavioral difficulties that have the potential to lead to high-risk health behavior in their teen years, according to a new study from Oregon State University psychology professor.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joshua Weller
Joshua.weller@oregonstate.edu
541-737-1358
Oregon State University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal
POLARBEAR seeks cosmic answers in microwave polarization
Based on measurements of B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background radiation, BICEP2 reported last March detection of gravitational waves caused by inflation in the early universe. The POLARBEAR experiment is studying this B-mode polarization to answer other questions: what is the overall structure of matter in the universe, what are the masses of neutrinos, and what is the nature of dark matter and dark energy. New data proves the feasibility of this approach.
National Science Foundation, Simon Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Behavioral Ecology
Built-in billboards: Male bluefin killifish signal different things with different fins
They help fish swim, but fins also advertise a fish's social standing and health. In a new study, researchers report that for the male bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei), each colorful fin presents its own messages to other fish.
National Science Foundation Division of Environmental Biology

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mental rest and reflection boost learning, study suggests
A new study, which may have implications for approaches to education, finds that brain mechanisms engaged when people allow their minds to rest and reflect on things they've learned before may boost later learning.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Defense

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
UTA engineer uses advanced sensing, crowdsourcing to predict urban water flow, city needs
A University of Texas Arlington water resources engineer has been awarded a four-year, $1.2 million National Science Foundation grant to improve sustainability of large urban areas from extreme weather, urbanization and climate change.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
WSU researchers see how plants optimize their repair
Researchers led by a Washington State University biologist have found the optimal mechanism by which plants heal the botanical equivalent of a bad sunburn. Their work, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could lead to the development of crops that can repair the sun's damage more easily, improving yields and profitability.
Washington State Agricultural Research Center, National Science Foundation, United States-Israel Binational Agricultural Research and Development Fund, Israel Science Foundation, Human Frontier Science Program Organization

Contact: Helmut Kirchhoff
kirchhh@wsu.edu
509-335-3304
Washington State University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Educational Technology Research & Development
Digital native fallacy: Teachers still know better when it comes to using technology
Members of today's younger Net Generation aren't more tech savvy than their teachers just because they were born into a world full of computers. In fact, if it weren't for the coaxing and support of their educators, many students would never use their electronic devices for more than playing games or listening to music. So reports a new study in the journal Educational Technology Research & Development, published by Springer.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Facetless crystals that mimic starfish shells could advance 3-D-printing pills
In a design that mimics a hard-to-duplicate texture of starfish shells, University of Michigan engineers have made rounded crystals that have no facets.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Preventing woody shrubs from swallowing grasslands a burning issue
A team from four universities including Virginia Tech will use a $1.3 million National Science Foundation grant to look at governmental policies and social attitudes on the use of fire to reduce the vulnerability of grasslands to the invasion of woody plants.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Davis
davisl@vt.edu
540-231-6157
Virginia Tech

Showing releases 1-25 out of 837.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 ]

  Highlights
Science360 Science360 News Service
Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Science360 News is an up-to-date view of breaking science news from around the world. We gather news from wherever science is happening, including directly from scientists, college and university press offices, popular and peer-reviewed journals, dozens of National Science Foundation science and engineering centers, and funding sources that include government agencies, not-for-profit organizations and private industry.
Charles Darwin Science for Everyone
Let NSF be your portal to the latest science and engineering news—in videos, images, podcasts, articles, features and more.
NAGC Winner - Jellyfish NSF Exclusive Special Reports
From the "Birth of the Internet" to "Jellyfish Gone Wild", these in-depth, Web-based reports explore the frontiers of science and engineering.