National Science Foundation
Search NSF News:
 
{NSF_SLIDER}
NSF Main
NSF News
NSF Funded Research News
 
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 
At nsf.gov
Contacts Page
Multimedia Gallery
Media Advisories
Publications
Special Reports
Awards Search
Science & Engineering Stats
NSF & Congress
About NSF
RSS Feed RSS Feed
Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 821.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 ]

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Breakthrough in particle control creates special half-vortex rotation
A breakthrough in the control of a type of particle known as the polariton has created a highly specialized form of rotation.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Corporate Comms
corporatecomms@strath.ac.uk
44-014-154-82370
University of Strathclyde

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
The Cryosphere
Combined Arctic ice observations show decades of loss
Historic submarine and modern satellite records show that average ice thickness in the central Arctic Ocean dropped by 65 percent from 1975 to 2012. September ice thickness, when the ice cover is at a minimum, dropped by 85 percent.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 3-Mar-2015
Communication Research
Vaccine skeptics aren't swayed by emotional scare tactics
On the heels of a nationwide measles outbreak comes a report that campaigns aimed at scaring people about the consequences of non-vaccination might not be as effective as many think. An upcoming article in the journal Communication Research challenges the popular assumption that emotional appeals have a wide, sweeping effect on people's health beliefs.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Graham Dixon
graham.dixon@wsu.edu
509-335-6547
Washington State University

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Some tropical plants pick the best hummingbirds to pollinate flowers
Rather than just waiting patiently for any pollinator that comes their way to start the next generation of seeds, some plants appear to recognize the best suitors and 'turn on' to increase the chance of success. Being picky may increase access to genetic diversity and thus give the plants a competitive advantage over their neighbors
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Betts
matthew.betts@oregonstate.edu
541-737-3841
Oregon State University

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Nature Materials
The rub with friction
In a new paper in Nature Materials, Brandeis University professor Zvonomir Dogic and his lab explored friction at the microscopic level. They discovered that the force generating friction is much stronger than previously thought. The discovery is an important step toward understanding the physics of the cellular and molecular world and designing the next generation of microscopic and nanotechnologies.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Leah Burrows
lburrows@brandeis.edu
781-736-4027
Brandeis University

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New technique improves forecasts for Canada's prized salmon fishery
A method developed by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego researchers for analyzing and predicting nature's dynamic and interconnected systems has improved forecasts of populations of Fraser River Sockeye Salmon, a highly prized fishery in British Columbia.
National Science Foundation, Foundation for the Advancement of Outstanding Scholarship and Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan, NSF NOAA Comparative Analysis of Marine Ecosystem Organization Program

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Sizing up cells: Study finds possible regulator of growth
Modern biology has attained deep knowledge of how cells work, but the mechanisms by which cellular structures assemble and grow to the right size largely remain a mystery. Now, Princeton University researchers may have found the key in a dynamic agglomeration of molecules inside cells.
National Institutes of Health, Searle Scholars Program, National Science Foundation, Damon Runyon Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: John Sullivan
js29@princeton.edu
609-258-4597
Princeton University, Engineering School

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Current Biology
Genome reveals how Hessian fly causes galls in wheat
A team of researchers from 26 institutions around the world has sequenced the Hessian fly genome, shedding light on how the insect creates growth-stunting galls in wheat.
US Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture, National Science Foundation, Swedish Research Council, Royal Physiographic Society, Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
nvanhoos@purdue.edu
765-496-2050
Purdue University

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
ACS Nano
Colon + septic tank = unique, at times stinky, study
What do a human colon, septic tank, copper nanoparticles and zebrafish have in common? They were the key components used by researchers at the University of California, Riverside and UCLA to study the impact copper nanoparticles, which are found in everything from paint to cosmetics, have on organisms inadvertently exposed to them.
National Science Foundation, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Nature Photonics
Black phosphorus is new 'wonder material' for improving optical communication
In a new study, researchers from the University of Minnesota used an ultrathin black phosphorus film -- only 20 layers of atoms -- to demonstrate high-speed data communication on nanoscale optical circuits.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Rhonda Zurn
rzurn@umn.edu
612-626-7959
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Nature
Unlocking the key to immunological memory in bacteria
A powerful genome editing tool may soon become even more powerful. Berkeley Lab researchers have unlocked the key to how bacteria are able to 'steal' genetic information from viruses and other foreign invaders for use in their own immunological memory system.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Nature Communications
Forbidden quantum leaps possible with high-res spectroscopy
A new twist on an old tool lets scientists use light to study and control matter with 1,000 times better resolution and precision than previously possible.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
NSF CAREER award to Wayne State aims to determine causes of seismic anisotropy
Wayne State University's Sarah Jo Brownlee, Ph.D., assistant professor of geology in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, has been awarded a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award, the foundation's most prestigious accolade for up-and-coming young faculty members.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
IEEE Transactions on Robotics
Clever application of magnetic force enhances laparoscopic surgery
A team of Vanderbilt engineers is using magnetic force to design new and improved instruments for minimally invasive surgery. The use of magnetic actuation allows them to create tools that are more flexible and more powerful than conventional designs, which place the instruments on the end of long sticks. The first device of this type that they have designed is an organ retractor that repositions organs like the liver when required for an operation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Addiction
The more friends you drink with ... the more you drink
A new study published today by the scientific journal Addiction shows that alcohol consumption of individuals appears to increase with the number of friends in their drinking group.
Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Jean O'Reilly
jean@addictionjournal.org
44-207-848-0853
Wiley

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Chemical Communications
Patent awarded for compounds that inhibit biofilm formation and persistence
University of Maryland researchers have developed chemical compounds that enhance the effectiveness of conventional antibiotics and inhibit the formation and persistence of biofilms. On Feb. 10, 2015, the researchers were awarded US Patent 8,952,192 for the compounds.
National Science Foundation, Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation

Contact: Abby Robinson
abbyr@umd.edu
301-405-5845
University of Maryland

Public Release: 2-Mar-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Water in smog may reveal pollution sources
The chemical signature of water vapor emitted by combustion sources such as vehicles and furnaces has been found in the smoggy winter inversions that often choke Salt Lake City. The discovery may give researchers a new tool to track down the sources of pollutants and climate-changing carbon dioxide gas.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 27-Feb-2015
Science Advances
CWRU researchers bring clean energy a step closer
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have made an inexpensive metal-free catalyst that performs as well as costly metal catalysts at speeding the oxygen reduction reaction in an acidic fuel cell, and is more durable. The catalyst is made of sheets of nitrogen-doped graphene that provides great surface area, carbon nanotubes that enhance conductivity, and carbon black particles that separate the layers allowing the electrolyte and oxygen to flow freely, which greatly increased performance and efficiency.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Interface
Social circles
An MIT study details the degree to which urban movement is linked to social activity.
Accenture-MIT Alliance in Business Analytics, Center for Complex Engineering Systems at MIT, National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Looking into the light
Jon Schuller, professor of electrical and computer engineering, receives an NSF CAREER award to investigate the interactions between light and organic materials.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ucsb.edu
805-893-4765
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Science
Economic models provide insights into global sustainability challenges
Using models that blend global economics, geography, ecology and environmental sciences is essential to understanding how changes in trade and natural systems in one part of the world affect those in another, a review concludes.
National Science Foundation, International Network of Research on Coupled Human and Natural Systems, Michigan State University, Michigan AgBioResearch

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
nvanhoos@purdue.edu
765-496-2050
Purdue University

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
How mantis shrimp evolved many shapes with same powerful punch
The miniweight boxing title of the animal world belongs to the mantis shrimp, a cigar-sized crustacean whose front claws can deliver an explosive 60-mile-per-hour blow akin to a bullet leaving the barrel of a gun. A study of 80 million years of mantis shrimp evolution reveals how these fast weapons evolved their dizzying array of shapes -- from spiny and barbed spears to hatchets and hammers -- while still managing to pack their characteristic punch.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Science
Interaction of Atlantic and Pacific oscillations caused 'false pause' in warming
The recent slowdown in climate warming is due, at least in part, to natural oscillations in the climate, according to a team of climate scientists, who add that these oscillations represent variability internal to the climate system. They do not signal any slowdown in human-caused global warming.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Scientific Reports
Amphibian chytrid fungus reaches Madagascar
The chytrid fungus, which is fatal to amphibians, has been detected in Madagascar for the first time. This means that the chytridiomycosis pandemic has now reached a biodiversity hotspot. Researchers from UFZ Leipzig and TU Braunschweig, together with international colleagues, are therefore proposing an emergency plan. This includes monitoring the spread of the pathogenic fungus, building amphibian breeding stations and developing probiotic treatments, say the scientists, writing in Scientific Reports.
National Science Foundation, VolkswagensStiftung, German Research Foundation, Era-Net Network 'BiodivERsA,' EU project RACE

Contact: Dr. Dirk S. Schmeller
dirk.schmeller@ufz.de
49-034-123-53282
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Physical Review Letters
New insight found in black hole collisions
New research by an astrophysicist at The University of Texas at Dallas provides revelations about the most energetic event in the universe -- the merging of two spinning, orbiting black holes into a much larger black hole.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Amanda Siegfried
amanda.siegfried@utdallas.edu
972-883-4335
University of Texas at Dallas

Showing releases 1-25 out of 821.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 ]

  Highlights
Science360 Science360 News Service
Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Science360 News is an up-to-date view of breaking science news from around the world. We gather news from wherever science is happening, including directly from scientists, college and university press offices, popular and peer-reviewed journals, dozens of National Science Foundation science and engineering centers, and funding sources that include government agencies, not-for-profit organizations and private industry.
Science360 Science for Everyone
The Science360 Video Library immerses visitors in the latest wonders of science, engineering, technology and math. Each video is embeddable for use on your website, blog or social media page.
NAGC Winner - Jellyfish NSF Exclusive Special Reports
From "Understanding the Brain" to "Engineering Agriculture's Future", these in-depth, Web-based reports explore the frontiers of science and engineering.