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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 749.

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Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study: Altruistic adolescents less likely to become depressed
It is better to give than to receive - at least if you're an adolescent and you enjoy giving, a new study suggests. The study found that 15- and 16-year-olds who find pleasure in pro-social activities, such as giving their money to family members, are less likely to become depressed than those who get a bigger thrill from taking risks or keeping the money for themselves.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Animals with bigger brains, broader diets have better self control
A new study representing the largest study of animal intelligence to-date finds that animals with bigger brains and broader diets have better self-control. Published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the results are part of a long history of research aimed at understanding why some species are able to do things like make and use tools, read social cues, or even understand basic math, and others aren't.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
rsmith@nescent.org
919-668-4544
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
LSUHSC awarded NSF grant for summer research experience for underrepresented undergrads
The National Science Foundation has awarded LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans a Research Experiences for Undergraduates Site grant in the amount of $295,635. The funding will support the training of undergraduates from diverse social and educational backgrounds, underrepresented in the sciences, especially from the New Orleans area. The project will provide students with training for 10 weeks during the summers of 2014-16.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Leslie Capo
lcapo@lsuhsc.edu
504-568-4806
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How a plant beckons the bacteria that will do it harm
A common plant puts out a welcome mat to bacteria seeking to invade, and scientists have discovered the mat's molecular mix. The team showed that the humble and oft-studied plant Arabidopsis puts out a molecular signal that invites an attack from a pathogen. The study reveals new targets during the battle between microbe, which often infects tomatoes, and host that researchers can exploit to protect plants.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tom Rickey
tom.rickey@pnnl.gov
509-375-3732
DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Current Biology
Oldest pterodactyloid species discovered, named by international team of researchers
An international research team, including a George Washington University professor, has discovered and named the earliest and most primitive pterodactyloid -- a group of flying reptiles that would go on to become the largest known flying creatures to have ever existed -- and established they flew above the earth some 163 million years ago, longer than previously known.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kurtis Hiatt
kkhiatt@gwu.edu
202-735-6361
George Washington University

Public Release: 24-Apr-2014
Cell
Researchers create comprehensive map of human B cell development
A Columbia and Stanford team describes a new method for mapping cellular development at the single cell level. By combining emerging technologies with a new, advanced computational algorithm, they created the most comprehensive map ever made of human B cell development. The approach will improve the ability to investigate development in cells of all types, help identify rare aberrations that lead to disease, and guide the next generation of research in regenerative medicine.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Packard

Contact: Christopher Williams
cmw2189@columbia.edu
212-851-5154
Columbia University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Brookings Papers on Economic Activity Spring 2014 Conference
Princeton release: Not just the poor live hand-to-mouth
Thirty to 40 percent of US households live hand-to-mouth, but work by researchers at Princeton and New York University found that most of those people aren't poor.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michael Hotchkiss
mh14@princeton.edu
609-258-9522
Princeton University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Economics = MC2 -- A portrait of the modern physics startup
In recent decades, many large high-tech companies have eliminated in-house research programs, turning instead to startup companies as their primary source of breakthrough innovations. AIP has released a new report on physics startups, based on interviews with 140 physicists and other professionals at some 91 startup companies in 14 states, companies which are engaged in making medical devices, manufacturing tools, nanotechnology, lasers and optical devices, renewable energy technologies and other products.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jason Socrates Bardi
jbardi@aip.org
240-535-4954
American Institute of Physics

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Gold nanoparticles help target, quantify breast cancer segments in a living cell
Purdue University researchers have developed a way to detect and measure cancer levels in a living cell by using tiny gold particles with tails of synthetic DNA.
National Science Foundation, Indiana Clinical Transitional Sciences Institute, Purdue Center for Cancer Research, Samsung

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
nvanhoos@purdue.edu
765-496-2050
Purdue University

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Biology Letters
Scientists identify source of mysterious sound in the Southern Ocean
Scientists have conclusive evidence that the source of a unique rhythmic sound, recorded for decades in the Southern Ocean and called the 'bio-duck,' is the Antarctic minke whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis). First described and named by submarine personnel in the 1960s who thought it sounded like a duck, the bio-duck sound has been recorded at various locations in the Southern Ocean, but its source has remained a mystery, until now.
NOAA Fisheries, NSF/Office of Polar Programs, US Navy Environmental Readiness Division

Contact: Shelley Dawicki
shelley.dawicki@noaa.gov
508-495-2378
NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
Chemical Science
Following a protein's travel inside cells is key to improving patient monitoring, drug development
Virginia Tech chemical engineer Chang Lu and his colleagues have used a National Science Foundation grant to develop a technique to detect subcellular location of a protein.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Nystrom
tansy@vt.edu
540-231-4371
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 23-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Scientists discover a new shape using rubber bands
While experimenting with elastic strips, Harvard researchers have stumbled upon a surprising discovery: a hemihelix with multiple perversions, a shape rarely seen in nature.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Paul Karoff
karoff@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-0450
Harvard University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Best practices in communication for the animal world
Effective communication is not just about the signaler, according to the study, the receiver also needs to assess the signaler efficiently. For instance, one of the most effective strategies from the perspective of female birds is assessing groups of males called leks, where females can assess multiple males in a short period of time.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Annette Gallagher
a.gallagher1@umiami.edu
305-284-1121
University of Miami

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Connecticut River watershed study will assess impacts of extreme rain events
A team of Yale researchers will lead a five-year, $3 million study to determine whether an increase in extreme rain events is affecting the transport of dissolved organic matter through the Connecticut River watershed, a phenomenon they say could alter the chemical composition and water quality of the watershed and Long Island Sound. The grant is funded by the National Science Foundation's MacroSystems Biology program.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Dennehy
kevin.dennehy@yale.edu
203-436-4842
Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Acta Biomaterialia
Mantis shrimp stronger than airplanes
Inspired by the fist-like club of a mantis shrimp, a team of researchers led by University of California, Riverside, in collaboration with University of Southern California and Purdue University, have developed a design structure for composite materials that is more impact resistant and tougher than the standard used in airplanes.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computer Systems
Carnegie Mellon system lets iPad users explore data with their fingers
Spreadsheets may have been the original killer app for personal computers, but data tables don't play to the strengths of multi-touch devices such as tablets. So researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a visualization approach that allows people to explore complex data with their fingers. Called Kinetica, the proof-of-concept system for the Apple iPad converts tabular data, such as Excel spreadsheets, into colored spheres that respond to touch.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Biology Letters
Cougars' diverse diet helped them survive the Pleistocene mass extinction
Cougars may have survived the mass extinction that took place about 12,000 years ago because they were not particular about what they ate, unlike their more finicky cousins the saber-tooth cat and American lion who perished, according a new analysis of the microscopic wear marks on the teeth of fossil cougars, saber-tooth cats and American lions.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Queuing theory helps physicist understand protein recycling
Will Mather tries to extend an understanding of waiting in line to how cells operate, especially as it relates to what the consequences could be of protein traffic jams inside cells.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Rosaire Bushey
busheyr@vt.edu
540-231-5035
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Science
'Upside-down planet' reveals new method for studying binary star systems
What looked at first like a sort of upside-down planet has instead revealed a new method for studying binary star systems, discovered by a University of Washington student astronomer.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Kelley
kellep@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Sleep
Penn researchers find link between sleep and immune function in fruit flies
When we get sick it feels natural to try to hasten our recovery by getting some extra shuteye. Researchers have found that this response has a definite purpose, in fruit flies: enhancing immune system response and recovery to infection.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Today's Antarctic region once as hot as California, Florida
Parts of ancient Antarctica were as warm as today's California coast, and polar regions of the southern Pacific Ocean registered 21st-century Florida heat, according to scientists using a new way to measure past temperatures.
National Science Foundation, Statoil, European Research Council

Contact: Eric Gershon
eric.gershon@yale.edu
203-415-3108
Yale University

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Advanced Material Interfaces
Progress made in developing nanoscale electronics
Alexander Shestopalov, an assistant professor of chemical engineering at the University of Rochester, has figured out how to reliably control the current that flows through a circuit that is the width of a single molecule.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Iglinski
peter.iglinski@rochester.edu
585-273-4726
University of Rochester

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Taking the pulse of mountain formation in the Andes
Carmala Garzione, a professor of earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester, explains that the Altiplano plateau in the central Andes -- and most likely the entire mountain range -- was formed through a series of rapid growth spurts.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Iglinski
peter.iglinski@rochester.edu
585-273-4726
University of Rochester

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Psychological Science
People selectively remember the details of atrocities that absolve in-group members
Conversations about wartime atrocities often omit certain details. According to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, these omissions can lead people to have different memories for the event depending on social group membership.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ecology team improves understanding of valley-wide stream chemistry
Understanding the chemistry of streams at a finer scale could help to identify factors impairing water quality and help protect aquatic ecosystems.
National Science Foundation, A.W. Mellon Foundation

Contact: Kevin McGuire
kevin.mcguire@vt.edu
540-231-6017
Virginia Tech

Showing releases 1-25 out of 749.

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