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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 101-125 out of 845.

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Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Physics Review Letters
Deceptive-looking vortex line in superfluid led to twice-mistaken identity
So long, solitons: University of Chicago physicists have shown that a group of scientists were incorrect when they concluded that a mysterious effect found in superfluids indicated the presence of solitons -- exotic, solitary waves. Instead, they explain, the result was due to more pedestrian, whirlpool-like structures in the fluid. They published their explanation in the Sept. 19 issue of Physical Review Letters.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Hertz Foundation

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
How do lawyers matter? Study explores the question for low-income litigants
A study at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that was recently awarded a two-year $300,000 grant by the National Science Foundation is exploring questions confronting the legal profession in its effort to improve access to justice for low-income unrepresented civil litigants.
National Science Foundation, Institute for Research on Poverty

Contact: Tonya Brito
tlbrito@wisc.edu
608-265-6475
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Wayne State research aims to develop new, more efficient catalytic materials
In order to support the world's needs to make cheaper and more effective fuels, chemicals, polymers and more, new and more efficient catalytic materials and processes must be developed. A team of researchers, including several from Wayne State University, is tackling this problem with the help of a new grant from the National Science Foundation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Optics Letters
UT Arlington researchers develop new transparent nanoscintillators for radiation detection
US Department of Homeland Security-funded researchers in Texas have identified radiation detection properties in a light-emitting nanostructure made in a new way from two of the least expensive rare earth elements. Their work is being published this week in Optics Letters.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Homeland Security

Contact: Traci Peterson
tpeterso@uta.edu
817-521-5494
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Adding uncertainty to improve mathematical models
Mathematicians from Brown University have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might ultimately lead to mathematical models that better reflect the inherent uncertainties of the natural world.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How things coil
Columbia Engineering and Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers have combined computer simulations designed for Hollywood with precision model experiments to examine the mechanics of coiling, discovering in particular that the natural curvature of the rod dramatically affects the coiling process. Their study, which bridges engineering mechanics and computer graphics, impacts a variety of engineering applications, from the fabrication of nanotube serpentines to the laying of submarine cables and pipelines.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly.evarts@gmail.com
347-453-7408
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A safer approach for diagnostic medical imaging
A collaborative effort between EPFL, CNRS, ENS Lyon, CPE Lyon and ETH Zürich has led to the development of a novel approach that can considerably improve the capabilities of medical imaging with safer procedures for the patient.
Lyon Science Transfert, Swiss National Science Foundation, SATT Lyon-Saint Etienne, European Research Council

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Viral infection might just be a phase... transition
Many double-stranded DNA viruses infect cells by ejecting their genetic information into a host cell. But how does the rigid DNA packaged inside a virus flow into a cell? In two separate studies, Carnegie Mellon biophysicist Alex Evilevitch has shown that in viruses that infect both bacteria and humans, a phase transition at the temperature of infection allows the DNA to change from a rigid crystalline structure into a fluid-like structure that facilitates infection.
Swedish Research Council, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, McWilliams Fellowship at Carnegie Mellon

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society
Causes of California drought linked to climate change
The extreme atmospheric conditions associated with California's crippling drought are far more likely to occur under today's global warming conditions than in the climate that existed before humans emitted large amounts of greenhouse gases, Stanford scientists say.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, UPS Fund

Contact: Ker Than
kerthan@stanford.edu
650-723-9820
Stanford University

Public Release: 27-Sep-2014
Science
Evolutionary biology: It's not just for textbooks anymore
UA scientists, including entomology expert Bruce Tabashnik, are on the leading edge of an approach to tackle global challenges in food security, emerging diseases and biodiversity loss.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, Maine Agricultural and Forest Experiment Station, National Research Centre for Growth and Development, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, others

Contact: Daniel Stolte
stolte@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4402
University of Arizona

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Forming better database queries at heart of NSF research project
A UT Arlington computer scientist is helping design a system that will ask better questions when querying databases and lead to improved decision-making in our data-driven society.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Carnegie Mellon awarded NSF grant to combine models of neuronal computation
Carnegie Mellon biologist Nathan Urban and statistician Robert Kass have received a $930,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to apply biological and statistical neuroscience approaches in order to create a better overall understanding of how neurons encode information. The research, which is funded by the NSF through the Collaborative Research in Computational Neuroscience program, is part of Carnegie Mellon's BrainHub, an interdisciplinary neuroscience research initiative.
National Science Foundation, Israeli Binational Science Foundation

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Science
Penn chemists observe key reaction for producing 'atmosphere's detergent'
A University of Pennsylvania team has now observed a rapid atmospheric reaction critical to breaking down pollution in the lab. They identify an important intermediate molecule and track its transformation to hydroxyl radicals, also demonstrating the amount of energy necessary for the reaction to take place.
National Science Foundation, Dreyfus Postdoctoral Program in Environmental Chemistry, American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund and Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
New UT Dallas technology may lead to prolonged power in mobile devices
Researchers from the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science have created technology that could be the first step toward wearable computers with self-contained power sources or, more immediately, a smartphone that doesn't die after a few hours of heavy use.
National Science Foundation, US Office of Naval Research

Contact: LaKisha Ladson
lakisha.ladson@UTDallas.edu
972-883-4183
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
Nano Letters
Penn team studies nanocrystals by passing them through tiny pores
An interdisciplinary team of University of Pennsylvania researchers has now applied a cutting-edge technique for rapid gene sequencing toward measuring other nanoscopic structures. By passing nanoscale spheres and rods through a tiny hole in a membrane, the team was able to measure the electrical properties of those structures' surfaces. Their findings suggest new ways of using this technique, known as 'nanopore translocation,' to analyze objects at the smallest scale.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
NSF grants $1 million to MU to expand supercomputer equipment and expertise
The National Science Foundation has awarded $1 million in two grants to the University of Missouri to install a supercomputer enabling data-intensive research and education at MU in fields such as bioinformatics, geoinformatics, high performance computing and engineering applications. The grants also will fund the position of a cyberinfrastructure engineer at MU. Together, the equipment and expert personnel will lead a network of data analysis capabilities at MU that will be shared with other campuses within the University of Missouri System.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 26-Sep-2014
International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems
Underwater robot for port security
Football-size robot can skim discreetly along a ship's hull to seek hollow compartments concealing contraband.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Analytical Chemistry
High-throughput cell-sorting method can separate 10 billion bacterial cells in 30 minutes
University of Hawaii at Manoa College of Engineering mechanical engineer Yi Zuo has developed a new, high-throughput method for sorting cells capable of separating 10 billion bacterial cells in 30 minutes. The finding has already proven useful for studying bacterial cells and microalgae, and could one day have direct applications for biomedical research and environmental science -- basically any field in which a large quantity of microbial samples need to be processed.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
CAREER grant to help UT Arlington professor study earthquakes, create teacher Geocorps
A UT Arlington assistant professor of earth and environmental sciences awarded up to $400,000 from the National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program will study how rock structures react to events such as earthquakes, meteor impacts and explosions. He'll also use the new grant to partner with Teach for America -- Dallas-Fort Worth to create the TFA Geocorps.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Traci Peterson
tpeterso@uta.edu
817-521-5494
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Science
Longstanding bottleneck in crystal structure prediction solved
The various patterns that atoms of a solid material can adopt, called crystal structures, can have a huge impact on its properties. Being able to accurately predict the most stable crystal structure for a material has been a longstanding challenge for scientists. Researchers calculated the lattice energy of benzene, a simple yet important molecule in pharmaceutical and energy research, to sub-kilojoule per mole accuracy -- a level of certainty that allows polymorphism to be resolved.
Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Contact: Tien Nguyen
tienn@princeton.edu
609-258-6523
Princeton University

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Cell
Researchers engineer 'Cas9' animal models to study disease and inform drug discovery
Researchers from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a new mouse model to simplify application of the CRISPR-Cas9 system for in vivo genome editing experiments. The researchers successfully used the new 'Cas9 mouse' model to edit multiple genes in a variety of cell types, and to model lung adenocarcinoma, one of the most lethal human cancers. A paper describing this new model and its initial applications appears this week in Cell.
National Science Foundation, The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Institute, MIT/Simons Center for the Social Brain, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Haley Bridger
hbridger@broadinstitute.org
617-714-7968
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Plant Cell
Researchers uncover structure of enzyme that makes plant cellulose
Purdue researchers have discovered the structure of the enzyme that makes cellulose, a finding that could lead to easier ways of breaking down plant materials to make biofuels and other products and materials.
Center for the Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, National Research Foundation of Korea

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
nvanhoos@purdue.edu
765-496-2050
Purdue University

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
PLOS ONE
Water research tackles growing grassland threat: Trees
Two Kansas State University biologists are studying streams to prevent tallgrass prairies from turning into shrublands and forests.
National Science Foundation Konza Prairie Long-Term Ecological Research Program, Kansas Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research

Contact: Walter Dodds
wkdodds@k-state.edu
785-532-6998
Kansas State University

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
Genetic, developmental and anatomical basis of natural selection for sensory structures
Hoping to understand how the tremendous diversity of life on Earth evolved even as irreversible species and habitat loss rapidly proceeds, a research group of bat experts including biologist Elizabeth Dumont of the University of Massachusetts Amherst has received a five-year, $1.91 million grant from the National Science Foundation to study how bats sense their environment and other individuals, including potential mates, to ensure survival and reproduction.
NSF/Dimensions of Biodiversity Program

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 25-Sep-2014
ChemBioChem
Chemists recruit anthrax to deliver cancer drugs
Researchers from MIT have found that with some tinkering, a deadly protein becomes an efficient carrier for antibody drugs.
MIT Reed Fund, Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s+mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Showing releases 101-125 out of 845.

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