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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 883.

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Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
The living, breathing ocean
The ocean is a complex ecosystem. The ocean carbon cycle is governed by the relationship among carbon, nutrients and oxygen, and the ratio between certain elements is key to understanding ocean respiration.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry B
Cell's skeleton is never still
Computer models developed at Rice University show how microtubules age. The models help explain the dynamic instability seen in microtubules, essential elements in cells' cytoskeletons.
Welch Foundation, National Science Foundation, and Center for Theoretical Biological Physics

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Photonics
Ultra-short X-ray pulses explore the nano world
Ultra-short and extremely strong X-ray flashes, as produced by free-electron lasers, are opening the door to a hitherto unknown world. Scientists are using these flashes to take 'snapshots' of the geometry of tiniest structures, for example the arrangement of atoms in molecules. To improve not only spatial but also temporal resolution further requires knowledge about the precise duration and intensity of the X-ray flashes. An international team of scientists has now tackled this challenge.
German Research Foundation, Bavaria California Technology Center International, Max Planck Research Schools, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Science Foundation Ireland, European Union

Contact: Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists do glass a solid -- with new theory on how it transitions from a liquid
How does glass transition from a liquid to its familiar solid state? How does this common material transport heat and sound? And what microscopic changes occur when a glass gains rigidity as it cools? A team of researchers at NYU's Center for Soft Matter Research offers a theoretical explanation for these processes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Materials Research Society Conference
An inside job: UC-designed nanoparticles infiltrate, kill cancer cells from within
UC nanoparticle designs target and treat early stage cancer cells by killing those cells with heat, delivered from inside the cell itself. Normal cells are thus left unaffected by the treatment regimen.
National Science Foundation

Contact: M.B. Reilly
reillymb@ucmail.uc.edu
513-556-1824
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Wireless electronic implants stop staph, then dissolve
For the first time, researchers have demonstrated a resorbable electronic implant that eliminated bacterial infection in mice by delivering heat to infected tissue when triggered by a remote wireless signal. The silk and magnesium devices then harmlessly dissolved. This is an important step forward for future development of on-demand medical devices that can be turned on remotely to perform a therapeutic function, such as managing post-surgical infection, and then degrade in the body.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Thurler
kim.thurler@tufts.edu
617-627-3175
Tufts University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Biotechnology
New device could make large biological circuits practical
An innovation from MIT could allow many biological components to be connected to produce predictable effects.
Eni-MIT Energy Research Fellowship, National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Ambulance risk
Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated by basic life support ambulances have higher survival rates and better neurological outcomes than patients treated by advanced life support ambulances.
National Science Foundation, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Angela Alberti
angela_alberti@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-3038
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Journal of Royal Society Interface
How the hummingbird achieves its aerobatic feats
Although hummingbirds are much larger and stir up the air more violently as they move, the way that they fly is more closely related to flying insects than it is to other birds.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Applied Physics Letters
New terahertz device could strengthen security
We are all familiar with the security hassles that accompany air travel. Now a new type of security detection that uses terahertz radiation is looking to prove its promise. Northwestern University researchers have developed a room temperature, compact, tunable terahertz source that could lead to advances in homeland security and space exploration. Able to detect explosives, chemical agents and dangerous biological substances from safe distances, devices using terahertz waves could make public spaces more secure than ever.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Homeland Security, Naval Air Systems Command, NASA

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
eLife
Life's extremists may be an untapped source of antibacterial drugs
Life's extremists, a family of microbes called Archaea, may be an untapped source of new antibacterial drugs. That conclusion arises from the discovery of the first antibacterial gene in this ancient lineage.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering
Researchers study impact of power prosthetic failures on amputees
Powered lower limb prosthetics hold promise for improving the mobility of amputees, but errors in the technology may also cause some users to stumble or fall. New research examines exactly what happens when these technologies fail, with the goal of developing a new generation of more robust powered prostheses.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Defense, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Researchers tease out glitches in immune system's self-recognition
In order to distinguish self from other, the immune system processes proteins from inside and outside the body in different ways. A new study revises understanding of how the process works and sheds light on autoimmune disease.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
UO-industry collaboration points to improved nanomaterials
A potential path to identify imperfections and improve the quality of nanomaterials for use in next-generation solar cells has emerged from a collaboration of University of Oregon and industry researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature Chemistry
Quantum mechanical calculations reveal the hidden states of enzyme active sites
Enzymes carry out fundamental biological processes such as photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and respiration, with the help of clusters of metal atoms as 'active' sites. But scientists lack basic information about their function because the states thought to be critical to their chemical abilities cannot be experimentally observed. Now, researchers at Princeton University have reported the first direct observation of the electronic states of iron-sulfur clusters, common to many enzyme active sites.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tien Nguyen
tienn@princeton.edu
Princeton University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Rutgers chemistry professor Darrin York named New Jersey Professor of the Year
Rutgers chemistry professor Darrin York developed a learning system that connects students and instructors to each other online, provides immediate feedback and a more intimate give-and-take than the 'recitation' classes that students used to take. For this and other ways he has helped students master general chemistry, a subject nearly all science, engineering and health-related majors require, York has been named the 2014 New Jersey Professor of the Year.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature
Darwin 2.0
It has long been thought that dramatic changes in a landscape like the formation of the Andes Mountain range or the Amazon River is the main driver that initiates species to diverge. However, a recent study shows that speciation occurred much later than these dramatic geographical changes. Researchers from LSU's Museum of Natural Science have found that time and a species' ability to move play greater parts in the process of speciation. This research was published today in the print edition of Nature.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Alison Satake
asatake@lsu.edu
225-578-3870
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
New computer model predicts gut metabolites to better understand gastrointestinal disease
Tufts University School of Engineering researchers and collaborators from Texas A&M University have published the first research to use computational modeling to predict and identify the metabolic products of gastrointestinal tract microorganisms. Understanding these metabolic products, or metabolites, could influence how clinicians diagnose and treat GI diseases, as well as many other metabolic and neurological diseases increasingly associated with compromised GI function.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Katie Cinnamond Benoit
katherine.cinnamond@tufts.edu
617-627-4703
Tufts University

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Out of India
Working at the edge of a coal mine in India, a team of Johns Hopkins researchers and colleagues have filled in a major gap in science's understanding of the evolution of a group of animals that includes horses and rhinos. That group likely originated on the subcontinent when it was still an island headed swiftly for collision with Asia, the researchers report Nov. 20 in the online journal Nature Communications.
National Geographic Society, Belgian Science Policy Office, National Science Foundation, Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology

Contact: Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Public Release: 20-Nov-2014
Science
China's new 'Great Wall' not so great
China's second great wall, a vast seawall covering more than half of the country's mainland coastline, is a foundation for financial gain -- and also a dyke holding a swelling rush of ecological woes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-0206
Michigan State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
UCI initiates joint project utilizing the arts to improve grade school science education
Through an innovative new program developed at UC Irvine, the arts and the sciences -- which often occupy opposite ends of the grammar school curriculum -- are being integrated to help young students better grasp the basics of Earth, life and physical sciences.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature Materials
Spiraling light, nanoparticles and insights into life's structure
As hands come in left and right versions that are mirror images of each other, so do the amino acids and sugars within us. But unlike hands, only the left-oriented amino acids and the right-oriented sugars ever make into life as we know it.
Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion, Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Infant Mental Health Journal
Fathers' engagement with baby depends on mother
Fathers' involvement with their newborns depends on mothers' preparation for parenthood, even for fathers who show the most parenting skills, a new study suggests.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan
Schoppe-Sullivan.1@osu.edu
614-688-3437
Ohio State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Fountain of youth underlies Antarctic Mountains
In a new study in Geophysical Research Letters, scientists explain why the ice-covered Gamburtsev Mountains in the middle of Antarctica looks as young as they do.
National Science Foundation, UK NERC; German Federal Institute for Geosciences and Resources

Contact: Kim Martineau
kimlynnmartineau@gmail.com
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2014
Nature
'Green Revolution' changes breathing of the biosphere
The intense farming practices of the 'Green Revolution' are powerful enough to alter Earth's atmosphere at an ever-increasing rate, boosting the seasonal amplitude in atmospheric carbon dioxide to about 15 percent over the past five decades. That's the key finding of a new atmospheric model, which estimates that on average, the amplitude of the seasonal oscillation of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is increasing at a rate of 0.3 percent every year.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA

Contact: Abby Robinson
abbyr@umd.edu
301-405-5845
University of Maryland

Showing releases 126-150 out of 883.

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