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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 126-150 out of 904.

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Public Release: 3-Jun-2016
Physical Review Letters
Technique could help climate models sweat the small stuff
Research led by a Brown University physicist reveals a way to include small-scale dynamics into computer simulations of large-scale phenomena, which could make for better climate models and astrophysical simulations.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2016
Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Kent State & Cleveland Metroparks launch learning app
Educators, scientists, and technologists from the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Kent State University and Cleveland Metroparks have partnered to develop a new learning app that is now live and freely available on iTunes. The app, called ParkApps, features a number of different resources aimed at educating park visitors as they run, hike and bike through the parks. The project was funded by the National Science Foundation's Advancing Informal STEM Learning initiative.
National Science Foundation's Advancing Informal STEM Learning initiative

Contact: Rick Ferdig
rferdig@kent.edu
330-672-3317
Kent State University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2016
Animal Behaviour
Personality changes can affect fish body shape, locomotion
Fish that are bred to be bolder or more shy show corresponding changes to their body shape and locomotion, suggesting that personality changes affect other seemingly unrelated traits. The findings could be useful in animal breeding, pest management and studies of complex human behaviors.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Langerhans
langerhans@ncsu.edu
919-515-3514
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2016
eLife
Study shows how judgment of sensory simultaneity may develop in the brain
In a study using tadpoles, neuroscientists tracked how the brain develops its sense of whether two sensory inputs -- for example, vision and touch -- happened at the same time.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
Promising treatment prospects for invasive breast cancer
Scientists from the University of Zurich have been able to understand for the first time why many cancer cells adapt relatively quickly to the treatment with therapeutic antibodies in invasive forms of breast cancer. Instead of dying off, they are merely rendered inactive. The researchers have now developed an active substance that kills the cancer cells very effectively without harming healthy cells.
Swiss Cancer League, Swiss Cancer Research foundation, Swiss National Science Foundation, EU FP7 program AFFINOMICS, University of Zurich

Contact: Andreas Plueckthun
plueckthun@bioc.uzh.ch
41-446-355-570
University of Zurich

Public Release: 2-Jun-2016
Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging
FTIR and microarrays: Enabling more information from less sample
By using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), researchers at the Center for Structural Biology and Bioinformatics, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium can greatly increase the amount of information that can be extracted from a protein microarray. In a new report in the current issue of Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging, they show how high-quality spectra can be obtained from spots of protein no larger than the diameter of a human hair.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Esther Mateike
e.mateike@iospress.nl
31-206-883-355
IOS Press

Public Release: 2-Jun-2016
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Highly tuned catalytic controls
You could think of bioorthogonal chemistry as a discreet valet or concierge that steers two world leaders to a private meeting without making noise or trouble along the way. The valet is a catalyst of sorts, arranging the meeting to expedite a result that would not otherwise happen. Now, the collaborative work of four University of Delaware professors has given the valet an upgraded GPS and a turbo-charged engine, allowing for faster, more precise reactions that can be triggered by light or an enzyme.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Osteo Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Bothum
pbothum@udel.edu
302-831-1418
University of Delaware

Public Release: 2-Jun-2016
Stampede 2 drives the frontiers of science and engineering forward
The National Science Foundation announced a $30 million award to the Texas Advanced Computing Center at The University of Texas at Austin to acquire and deploy a new large scale supercomputing system, Stampede 2, as a strategic national resource to provide high-performance computing capabilities for thousands of researchers across the US.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Faith Singer-Villalobos
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-232-5771
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 2-Jun-2016
American Mineralogist
Scientists gain supervolcano insights from Wyoming granite
A new National Science Foundation-funded study by University of Wyoming researchers suggests that scientists can go back into the past to study the solidified magma chambers where erosion has removed the overlying rock, exposing granite underpinnings.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Carol Frost
frost@uwyo.edu
307-766-6254
University of Wyoming

Public Release: 2-Jun-2016
Science
Scientists find surprising magnetic excitations in a metallic compound
Scientists have found magnetic excitations in a metallic compound whose main source of magnetism is the orbital movement of its electrons. Their discovery challenges conventional wisdom that these excitations are only found in materials whose magnetism is dominated by the spin of its electrons.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, Netherlands Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Jun-2016
JCI Insight
Pulmonary artery stiffening is an early driver of pulmonary hypertension
In this issue of JCI Insight, a team led by Laura Fredenburgh of Brigham and Women's Hospital shows that alterations in pulmonary arterial stiffness occur early during disease and promote vascular remodeling by altering signaling mediated by prostaglandins, a class of hormones that regulate inflammation, smooth muscle contraction, and vasoconstrictoin.
American Thoracic Society/Pulmonary Hypertension Association/Pfizer Research Fellowship in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, National Institutes of Health, Cardiovascular Medical Research and Education Fund, National Science Foundation

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
JCI Journals

Public Release: 2-Jun-2016
Science
New radio map of Jupiter reveals what's beneath colorful clouds
Using the upgraded Very Large Array, UC Berkeley astronomers have produced a detailed radio map of the upper 100 kilometers of Jupiter's atmosphere, revealing the complex movement of ammonia gas that shapes the colorful clouds observed in the optical. The map will help understand how global circulation and cloud formation are driven by Jupiter's powerful internal heat source, and shed light on similar processes on giant planets in our solar system and around distant stars.
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
CBE--Life Sciences Education
Gender gap discovered in science exam performance
Arizona State University researchers and their collaborators have discovered that male students in undergraduate introductory biology courses are outperforming females at test time, but it may be due to how exams are designed rather than academic ability. In addition, high socioeconomic status students are performing better than lower-status students on those same tests.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sandra Leander
sandra.leander@asu.edu
480-965-9865
Arizona State University

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
UTA civil engineer creates phone app to gather public input on flash flooding conditions
A University of Texas at Arlington associate professor of civil engineering has launched a new Android cell phone app called iSeeFlood to encourage the public to file timely reports when they see flooding of varying severity on the streets, in and around their houses, and in streams and creeks. Such flash floods can be dangerous to pedestrians and motorists alike.
National Science Foundation's Cyber-Innovation for Sustainability Science and Engineering program

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence
Software turns webcams into eye-trackers
New software developed by Brown University computer scientists turns ordinary computer webcams into eye-tracking devices. The new software could help web developers to optimize content and make websites more user-friendly.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
Tufts engineer earns NSF Career Award to study multidimensional data science
Shuchin Aeron, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering in Tufts University's School of Engineering, has received a Faculty Early Career Development award from the National Science Foundation and US Department of Energy.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Patrick Collins
patrick.collins@tufts.edu
617-627-4173
Tufts University

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
Journal of Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments
Radar, bed sensors help health providers detect problems early
Developing and evaluating motion-capture technology to help older adults 'age in place' has been the focus of researchers at the University of Missouri for more than a decade. Previous research has utilized video game technology and various web-cameras to detect health changes in Tiger Place residents. Now, two new studies demonstrate how monitoring walking speed using radar and heart health by utilizing bed sensors help maintain older adults' health and warn of impeding issues.
National Science Foundation, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
Journal of Physical Chemistry C
Nanocars taken for a rough ride
Rice University and North Carolina State University researchers characterize how single-molecule nanocars move in open air. The research will help the kinetics of molecular machines in ambient conditions over time.
National Science Foundation, North Carolina State University

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics
New devices, wearable system aim to predict, prevent asthma attacks
Researchers have developed an integrated, wearable system that monitors a user's environment, heart rate and other physical attributes with the goal of predicting and preventing asthma attacks. The researchers plan to begin testing the system on a larger subject population this summer.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
CBE--Life Sciences Education
Hands-on science courses shown to boost graduation rates and STEM retention
A new study finds that courses that engage college students in conducting scientific research early on can dramatically increase students' odds of completing a science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) degree, a positive sign for efforts to boost US competitiveness in science and technology.
National Science Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Contact: Christine Sinatra
christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu
512-471-4641
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 1-Jun-2016
Scientific Reports
Scientists discover and test new class of pain relievers
A Duke research team has discovered a potential new class of small-molecule drugs that simultaneously inhibit two sought-after targets in the treatment of pain, the ion channels TRPV4 and TRPA1. Their proof-of-concept experiments in mice could lead to the development of a new drug to treat conditions including skin irritation, headaches, jaw pain and abdominal pain.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Defense, US Department of Veterans Affairs, National Science Foundation, Arthritis Foundation, Harrington Discovery Institute Scholar-Innovator Award

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 31-May-2016
2016 ACM Conference for Human Computer Interaction
'On-the-fly' 3-D print system prints what you design, as you design it
Cornell researchers have come up with an interactive prototyping system that prints what you are designing as you design it; the designer can pause anywhere in the process to test, measure and, if necessary, make changes that will be added to the physical model still in the printer.
National Science Foundation, Autodesk Corp.

Contact: Daryl Lovell
dal296@cornell.edu
607-592-3925
Cornell University

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Advanced Materials
Mantis shrimp inspires next generation of ultra-strong materials
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside and Purdue University are one step closer to developing super strong composite materials, thanks to the mantis shrimp, a small, multicolored marine crustacean that crushes the shells of its prey using a fist-like appendage called a dactyl club. Their latest research, to be published in the journal Advanced Materials, describes for the first time a unique herringbone structure, not previously reported in nature, within the appendage's outer layer.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Multi-University Research Initiative, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah Nightingale
sarah.nightingale@ucr.edu
951-827-4580
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Scientific Reports
Stick insects produce bacterial enzymes themselves
Many plant-feeding insects need microbial enzymes, such as pectinases, that degrade plant cell walls; yet some insects have overcome this dependency in a surprising way. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, found that stick insects make microbial enzymes themselves. From an ancestral gut microbe, the genes for the essential enzymes simply 'jumped' as they are to their insect host.
National Science Foundation, Max Planck Society, University of California in Davis, China National GeneBank, BGI-Shenzhen, German Research Foundation, Austria Science Fund FWF, and others

Contact: Dr. Matan Shelomi
mshelomi@ice.mpg.de
49-364-157-1560
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology

Public Release: 31-May-2016
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology
To strengthen an opinion, simply say it is based on morality
Simply telling people that their opinions are based on morality will make them stronger and more resistant to counterarguments, a new study suggests.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andrew Luttrell
Luttrell.19@osu.edu
Ohio State University

Showing releases 126-150 out of 904.

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