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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

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Showing releases 176-200 out of 854.

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Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Educational Technology Research & Development
Digital native fallacy: Teachers still know better when it comes to using technology
Members of today's younger Net Generation aren't more tech savvy than their teachers just because they were born into a world full of computers. In fact, if it weren't for the coaxing and support of their educators, many students would never use their electronic devices for more than playing games or listening to music. So reports a new study in the journal Educational Technology Research & Development, published by Springer.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Facetless crystals that mimic starfish shells could advance 3-D-printing pills
In a design that mimics a hard-to-duplicate texture of starfish shells, University of Michigan engineers have made rounded crystals that have no facets.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Preventing woody shrubs from swallowing grasslands a burning issue
A team from four universities including Virginia Tech will use a $1.3 million National Science Foundation grant to look at governmental policies and social attitudes on the use of fire to reduce the vulnerability of grasslands to the invasion of woody plants.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Davis
davisl@vt.edu
540-231-6157
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Nature Materials
Goldilocks principle wrong for particle assembly: Too hot and too cold is just right
Microscopic particles that bind under low temperatures will melt as temperatures rise to moderate levels, but re-connect under hotter conditions, a team of NYU scientists has found. Their discovery points to new ways to create 'smart materials,' cutting-edge materials that adapt to their environment by taking new forms, and to sharpen the detail of 3-D printing.
National Science Foundation, NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Environmental Science and Technology
New tracers can identify frack fluids in the environment
Duke scientists have developed geochemical tracers to identify hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids that have been spilled or released into the environment. The tracers have been field-tested at two sites and can distinguish fracking fluids from wastewater versus conventional wells or other sources. They give scientists new forensic tools to detect if fracking fluids are escaping into water supplies and what risks, if any, they might pose.
National Science Foundation, Park Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Imaging electric charge propagating along microbial nanowires
UMass Amherst physicists working with Derek Lovley and colleagues report in the current issue of Nature Nanotechnology that they've used a new imaging technique, electrostatic force microscopy, to resolve the biological debate with evidence from physics, showing that electric charges do indeed propagate along microbial nanowires just as they do in carbon nanotubes, a highly conductive man-made material.
Office of Naval Research, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 19-Oct-2014
Nature Chemistry
Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream
For the last 20 years, scientists have tried to design large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depth and complex features -- a design quest just fulfilled by a team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. The team built 32 DNA crystals with precisely-defined depth and an assortment of sophisticated three-dimensional features, an advance reported in Nature Chemistry.
Office of Naval Research, Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University

Contact: Kat J. McAlpine
katherine.mcalpine@wyss.harvard.edu
617-432-8266
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

Public Release: 17-Oct-2014
Nano Letters
Superconducting circuits, simplified
New circuit design could unlock the power of experimental superconducting computer chips.
National Science Foundation, Director of National Intelligence

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Science
Formation and large scale confinement of jets emitted by young stars finally elucidated
An international team of scientists has succeeded in explaining the formation and propagation over astronomical distances of jets of matter emitted by young stars -- one of the most fascinating mysteries of modern astronomy. Using a patented experimental device and large-scale numerical simulations, the team obtained data consistent with astrophysical observations
French National Research Agency, NSERC, Île de France region, Triangle de la Physique-Saclay, National Science Foundation, Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation

Contact: Gisèle Bolduc
gisele.bolduc@adm.inrs.ca
418-654-3817
INRS

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
IU-led team of biologists earns 1 of 12 biodiversity grants awarded by NSF
Indiana University biologists who specialize in the ecology and evolution of microbes have been named one of 12 teams in the nation to receive funding from the National Science Foundation's Dimensions of Biodiversity Program.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Steve Chaplin
stjchap@iu.edu
812-856-1896
Indiana University

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Brain's compass relies on geometric relationships, say Penn Researchers
The brain has a complex system for keeping track of which direction you are facing as you move about; remembering how to get from one place to another would otherwise be impossible. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown how the brain anchors this mental compass. Their findings provide a neurological basis for something that psychologists have long observed about navigational behavior: people use geometrical relationships to orient themselves.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Social Psychological and Personality Science
Executive scandal hurts job prospects even for entry-level employees
There's more bad news for job seekers with a scandal-hit company like Lehman Brothers or Countrywide Mortgage on their résumés. As if it weren't already hard enough to get a new job in this market, people who worked for those companies have tarnished reputations to overcome: New research finds that moral suspicion from higher-ups' wrongdoing spills down to people lower in an organization, even if they did not work directly under the moral transgressor.
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Regina Casper Stanford Graduate Fellowship

Contact: Lisa M.P. Munoz
spps.media@gmail.com
571-354-0754
SAGE Publications

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Science
Protons hog the momentum in neutron-rich nuclei
Protons and neutrons that have briefly paired up in the nucleus have higher-average momentum, leaving less for non-paired nucleons. Researchers have now shown for the first time that this phenomenon exists in nuclei heavier than carbon, including aluminum, iron and lead and also surprisingly allows a greater fraction of protons than neutrons to have high momentum in these neutron-rich nuclei, contrary to long-accepted theories and with implications for ultra-cold atomic gas systems and neutron stars.
DOE/Office of Science, National Science Foundation, Israel Science Foundation, Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Technologica, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Current Biology
Are male brains wired to ignore food for sex?
Choosing between two good things can be tough. When animals must decide between feeding and mating, it can get even trickier. In a discovery that might ring true even for some humans, researchers have shown that male brains -- at least in nematodes -- will suppress the ability to locate food in order to instead focus on finding a mate.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation, Human Frontiers Science Program, Autism Speaks

Contact: Mark Michaud
mark_michaud@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-4790
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Creating medical devices with dissolving metal
University of Pittsburgh researchers recently received another $1.5 million from the National Science Foundation to continue a combined multi-university, private-industry effort to develop implantable medical devices made from biodegradable metals.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joe Miksch
jmiksch@pitt.edu
412-624-4356
University of Pittsburgh

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Fluid Power Innovation and Research Conference
Brain surgery through the cheek
Vanderbilt engineers have developed a surgical robot designed to perform brain surgery by entering through the cheek instead of the skull that can operate on a patient in an MRI scanner.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Getting to know super-earths
Results from NASA's Kepler mission have indicated that the most common planets in the galaxy are super-Earths -- those that are bigger than Earth but smaller than Neptune. We have no examples of these planets in our own solar system, so Heather Knutson, assistant professor of planetary science at Caltech, and her colleagues are using space telescopes to try to find out more about these worlds. Most recently they used Hubble to study the planet HD 97658b, in the constellation Leo.
NASA, National Science Foundation (Graduate Research Fellowship), Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, European Research Council (advanced grant PEPS)

Contact: Brian Bell
bpbell@caltech.edu
626-395-5832
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Journal of Atmospheric Sciences
Weather history time machine
A San Diego State University geography professor, Samuel Shen, and colleagues have developed a software program that allows climate researchers to access historical climate data for the entire global surface (excluding the poles), including the oceans, based on Shen's statistical research into historical climates.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Natalia Elko
natalia.elko@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-2585
San Diego State University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
UTSA awarded $640,000 NSF grant to help economically disadvantaged students pursue science careers
The University of Texas at San Antonio has been awarded a five-year, $640,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to help economically disadvantaged students pursue graduate studies or scientific careers in the workforce.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kris Rodriguez
kris.rodriguez@utsa.edu
210-458-5116
University of Texas at San Antonio

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
A brighter design emerges for low-cost, 'greener' LED light bulbs
The phase-out of traditional incandescent bulbs in the US and elsewhere, as well as a growing interest in energy efficiency, has given light-emitting diode lighting a sales boost. However, that trend could be short-lived as key materials known as rare earth elements become more expensive. Scientists have now designed new materials for making household light-emitting diode bulbs without using these ingredients. They report their development in the American Chemical Society's Journal of the American Chemical Society.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Astronomers spot faraway Uranus-like planet
Our view of other solar systems just got a little more familiar, with the discovery of a planet 25,000 light-years away that resembles our own Uranus.
European Research Council, The Thomas Jefferson Chair for Discovery and Space Exploration, the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education, the National Research Foundation of Korea, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the National Science Foundation

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Nature
Researchers develop world's thinnest electric generator
Researchers from Columbia Engineering and the Georgia Institute of Technology report today that they have made the first experimental observation of piezoelectricity and the piezotronic effect in an atomically thin material, molybdenum disulfide, MoS2, resulting in a unique electric generator and mechanosensation devices that are optically transparent, extremely light, and very bendable and stretchable.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly.evarts@columbia.edu
212-854-3206
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists discover carbonate rocks are unrecognized methane sink
Since the first undersea methane seep was discovered 30 years ago, scientists have meticulously analyzed and measured how microbes in the seafloor sediments consume the greenhouse gas methane. They have now found a type of rock known as authigenic carbonate also contains vast amounts of active microbes that take up methane. This demonstrates that the global methane process is still poorly understood.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andrew Thurber
athurber@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-4500
Oregon State University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
$2.3 million NSF grant will fund MU study of math learning outcomes
Education researchers at the University of Missouri will receive nearly $2.3 million from the National Science Foundation over the next four years to study elementary students' mathematics learning outcomes in relation to teacher expertise and classroom assignment.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jesslyn Chew
ChewJ@missouri.edu
573-882-8353
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
The Anatomical Record
Dinosaur breathing study shows that noses enhanced smelling and cooled brain
It's been millions of years since T. rex took its last breath, but a team led by Ohio University scientists is breathing life back into dinosaurs using high-powered computer simulations to model airflow through dinosaur snouts. The research has important implications for how dinosaurs used their noses to not only breathe but to enhance the sense of smell and cool their brains.
National Science Foundation, Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine

Contact: Andrea Gibson
gibsona@ohio.edu
740-597-2166
Ohio University

Showing releases 176-200 out of 854.

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