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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 176-200 out of 822.

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Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Nature
800 meters beneath Antarctic ice sheet, subglacial lake holds viable microbial ecosystems
According to LSU's Brent Christner, the paper's lead author and a researcher with the NSF-funded Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling, or WISSARD, project, 'hidden beneath a half-mile of ice in Antarctica is an unexplored part of our biosphere. WISSARD has provided a glimpse of the nature of microbial life that may lurk under more than five million square miles of ice sheet.'
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dawn Jenkins
djenkins1@lsu.edu
225-578-2935
Louisiana State University

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Macromolecular Theory and Simulations
Researchers develop models to study polyelectrolytes, including DNA and RNA
Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a novel and versatile modeling strategy to simulate polyelectrolyte systems. The model has applications for creating new materials as well as for studying polyelectrolytes, including DNA and RNA.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Hot-spring bacteria reveal ability to use far-red light for photosynthesis
Bacteria growing in near darkness use a previously unknown process for harvesting energy and producing oxygen from sunlight, a research team led by a Penn State University scientist has discovered. The discovery lays the foundation for further research aimed at improving plant growth, harvesting energy from the sun, and understanding dense blooms like those now occurring on Lake Erie and other lakes worldwide.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Sunlight, not microbes, key to CO2 in Arctic
The vast reservoir of carbon stored in Arctic permafrost is gradually being converted to carbon dioxide after entering the freshwater system in a process thought to be controlled largely by microbial activity. However, researchers say that sunlight and not bacteria is the key to triggering the production of CO2 from material released by Arctic soils.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Byron Crump
bcrump@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-4369
Oregon State University

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Researchers map quantum vortices inside superfluid helium nanodroplets
Scientists have, for the first time, characterized so-called quantum vortices that swirl within tiny droplets of liquid helium. The research, led by scientists at the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory , the University of Southern California, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, confirms that helium nanodroplets are in fact the smallest possible superfluidic objects and opens new avenues to study quantum rotation.
National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division

Contact: Kate Greene
kgreene@lbl.gov
510-486-4404
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Current Biology
Alternate mechanism of species formation picks up support, thanks to a South American ant
A newly discovered species of ant supports a controversial theory of species formation.
National Science Foundation. Smithsonian Scholarly Studies Program, Smithsonian Restricted Endowments Fund

Contact: Peter Iglinski
peter.iglinski@rochester.edu
585-273-4726
University of Rochester

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
New properties of rotating superfluids discovered in helium nanodroplets
Scientists explore the strange properties of 'superfluids' -- a new state of matter.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Max Planck Society

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
PLOS Pathogens
From dandruff to deep sea vents, an ecologically hyper-diverse fungus
A ubiquitous skin fungus linked to dandruff, eczema and other itchy, flaky maladies in humans has now been tracked to even further global reaches -- including Hawaiian coral reefs and the extreme environments of arctic soils and deep sea vents.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Talia Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
How hummingbirds evolved to detect sweetness
Hummingbirds' ability to detect sweetness evolved from an ancestral savory taste receptor that is mostly tuned to flavors in amino acids.
National Science Foundation, Fulbright Commission and Science Foundation Ireland Research Frontiers Program, National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Cameron
david_cameron@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Cause of global warming hiatus found deep in the Atlantic Ocean
Observations shows that the heat absent from the Earth's surface for more than a decade is plunging deep in the north and south Atlantic Ocean, and is part of a naturally occurring cycle.
National Science Foundation, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Sunlight controls the fate of carbon released from thawing Arctic permafrost
Just how much Arctic permafrost will thaw in the future and how fast heat-trapping carbon dioxide will be released from those warming soils is a topic of lively debate among climate scientists.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Bernie DeGroat
bernied@umich.edu
734-647-1847
University of Michigan

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
Marine protected areas might not be enough to help overfished reefs recover
Pacific corals and fish can both smell a bad neighborhood, and use that ability to avoid settling in damaged reefs.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Aug-2014
Science
JILA team finds first direct evidence of 'spin symmetry' in atoms
Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics physicists led by theorist Ana Maria Rey and experimentalist Jun Ye have observed the first direct evidence of symmetry in the magnetic properties -- or nuclear 'spins' -- of atoms. The advance could spin off practical benefits such as the ability to simulate and better understand exotic materials such as superconductors.
National Institute of Standards and Technology, National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Laura Ost
laura.ost@nist.gov
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
High school students discover stars at SMU research program
Two Dallas high school students discovered five stars as members of a Southern Methodist University summer physics research program, QuarkNet, which enabled them to analyze data gleaned from a high-powered telescope in Los Alamos, N.M. Their discoveries have been accepted into the American Association of Variable Star Observers International Variable Star Index. QuarkNet is a physics teacher development program funded by the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, CERN, Fermilab

Contact: Nancy George
ngeorge@smu.edu
214-768-7674
Southern Methodist University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association
Many solve civil justice problems on their own, rarely involving attorneys, says study
Many of life's problems are also civil legal problems, but people don't see them that way. As a result, they often deal with them on their own, and rarely involve lawyers or courts, or even other third parties -- and it's rarely because of cost. Those were among the findings in a recent report by Rebecca Sandefur, a University of Illinois professor of sociology and of law, based on an extensive survey in a Midwestern city.
American Bar Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Craig Chamberlain
cdchambe@illinois.edu
217-333-2894
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
New CloudLab will help researchers test new cloud architectures
A $10 million National Science Foundation grant to create CloudLab will be distributed to partner institutions in addition to University of Massachusetts Amherst, including the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Clemson University, Raytheon BBN Technologies and US Ignite. CloudLab will consist of 5,000 linked cores, or computers, that will be free for research and classroom use and should be up and running by spring 2015.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Journal of Membrane Science
The power of salt
An MIT study investigates power generation from the meeting of river water and seawater.
King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals through the Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
The internet was delivered to the masses; parallel computing is not far behind
The groundwork for Virginia Tech's Wu Feng's big data research in a 'cloud' began in the mid-2000s with a multi-institutional effort to identify missing gene annotations in genomes. Today, this work is being formalized and extended as part of an National Science Foundation/Microsoft Computing in the Cloud grant that seeks to commoditize biocomputing in the cloud.
National Science Foundation, Microsoft, National Institutes of Health, US Air Force

Contact: Lynn Nystrom
tansy@vt.edu
540-231-4371
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
USENIX Security Symposium
New framework would facilitate use of new Android security modules
Computer security researchers have developed a modification to the core Android operating system that allows developers and users to plug in new security enhancements. The new Android Security Modules framework aims to eliminate the bottleneck that prevents developers and users from taking advantage of new security tools.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Journal of Visualized Experiments
Research paves way for development of cyborg moth 'biobots'
Researchers have developed methods for electronically manipulating the flight muscles of moths and for monitoring the electrical signals moths use to control those muscles. The work opens the door to the development of remotely-controlled moths, or 'biobots,' for use in emergency response.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Nature
New research shows seals and sea lions likely spread tuberculosis to humans
Scientists who study tuberculosis have long debated its origins. New research shows that tuberculosis likely spread from humans in Africa to seals and sea lions that brought the disease to South America and transmitted it to Native people there before Europeans landed on the continent.
National Science Foundation, European Research Council, Smithsonian Institution, Swiss National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Wenner-Gren Foundation, Wellcome Trust

Contact: Julie Newberg
480-727-3116
Arizona State University

Public Release: 20-Aug-2014
Nature
University of Tennessee research uncovers subglacial life beneath Antarctic ice sheet
University of Tennessee, Knoxville, research finds life can persist in a cold, dark world. A University of Tennessee microbiology assistant professor was part of a team that examined waters and sediments from a shallow lake deep beneath the Antarctic ice sheet and found the extreme environment supports microbial ecosystems.
National Science Foundation, NASA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Whitney Heins
wheins@utk.edu
865-974-5460
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Seafood substitutions can expose consumers to unexpectedly high mercury
New measurements from fish purchased at retail seafood counters in 10 different states show the extent to which mislabeling can expose consumers to unexpectedly high levels of mercury, a harmful pollutant. Fishery stock 'substitutions' -- which falsely present a fish of the same species, but from a different geographic origin -- are the most dangerous mislabeling offense, according to new research by University of Hawaii at Manoa scientists.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
PLOS ONE
Philippine tarsier gets boost from Kansas research, and genetic proof of a new variety
The tarsier is the 'flagship' iconic species for promoting environmental stewardship and ecotourism in the Philippines, a nation suffering from large-scale destruction of natural habitat.
National Geographic Society, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
blynch@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 19-Aug-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Exporting US coal to Asia could drop emissions 21 percent
Under the right scenario, exporting US coal to power plants in South Korea could lead to a 21 percent drop in greenhouse gas emissions compared to burning it at less energy-efficient US plants. Other emissions, including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and particulate matter, could also drop. But this success, Duke researchers say, depends on which fuel source the coal replaces in South Korea, and which fuel is used to replace it in the US.
Center for Climate and Energy Decision Making, National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Showing releases 176-200 out of 822.

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