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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 176-200 out of 878.

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Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Current Biology
For female chimpanzees, no consent agreement
In the animal kingdom, the battle of the sexes often truly becomes a battle. Among chimpanzees, males may violently attack females, sometimes resulting in serious wounds. While unpleasant to watch, the frequent occurrence of such violence at several East African field sites suggests that aggression toward females functions as a form of sexual coercion.
Jane Goodall Institute, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, University of Minnesota, Harris Steel Group, Windibrow Foundation, Carnegie Corporation

Contact: Ian Gilby
ian.gilby@asu.edu
480-965-3807
Arizona State University

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Science
Lightning expected to increase by 50 percent with global warming
UC Berkeley atmospheric scientist David Romps and his colleagues looked at predictions of precipitation and cloud buoyancy in 11 different climate models and concluded that their combined effect will generate 50 percent more electrical discharges to the ground by the end of the century because of global warming. The main cause is water vapor, which fuels explosive deep convection in the atmosphere. The more convection, the greater the charge separation and the more cloud-to-ground strikes.
Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Science
Pulling together the early solar system
A new study finds that a strong magnetic field whipped the early solar system into shape.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Current Biology
Male bullies father more chimpanzees
In a long-term study of interactions between chimpanzees in the famous Gombe National Park in Tanzania, researchers have found that males who consistently bully females tend to father more babies with their victims.
Jane Goodall Institute, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Carnegie Corporation, University of Minnesota, Duke University, Harris Steel Group, Windibrow Foundation

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Evolution and Human Behavior
Did men evolve navigation skills to find mates?
A University of Utah study of two African tribes found evidence that men evolved better navigation ability than women because men with better spatial skills - the ability to mentally manipulate objects -- can roam farther and have children with more mates.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Nature
A piece of the quantum puzzle
While the Martinis Lab at UC Santa Barbara has been focusing on quantum computation, former postdoctoral fellow Pedram Roushan and several colleagues have been exploring qubits (quantum bits) for quantum simulation on a smaller scale. Their research appears in the current edition of the journal Nature.
National Science Foundation, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Primordial galaxy bursts with starry births
Peering deep into time with one of the world's newest, most sophisticated telescopes, astronomers have found a galaxy -- AzTEC-3 -- that gives birth annually to 500 times the number of suns as the Milky Way galaxy, according to a new Cornell University-led study published Nov. 10 in the Astrophysical Journal.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Rice University program models more detailed evolutionary networks from genetic data
Rice University computer scientists develop software to build more accurate evolutionary networks from genomic data sets.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Library of Medicine, Keck Center of the Gulf Coast Consortia

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Journal of Neurolinguistics
Learning languages is a workout for brains, both young and old
Learning a new language changes your brain network both structurally and functionally, according to Penn State researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Victoria M. Indivero
vmi1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Dartmouth researchers test first 'smart spaces' using light to send data
One of the problems in the high-tech field of visible light communication -- or using light to send data wirelessly -- is decidedly low tech: The data transmission stops whenever the light is blocked by people's movements, shadows or other obstacles. But Dartmouth researchers are experimenting with the first 'smart spaces' that feature an interplay of algorithms, ceiling-mounted LEDs and light sensors embedded in floors and in smart devices, enabling a continuous flow of data wirelessly.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Journal of Royal Society Interface
Stock market models help NYU researchers predict animal behavior
Modeling used to forecast fluctuations in the stock market has been discovered to predict aspects of animal behavior. The movement of zebrafish when mapped is very similar to the stochastic jump process, a mathematical model used by financial engineers. The model could improve the effectiveness of experiments, minimize the number of fish used, and allow researchers to make better use of their data following experiments.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Insect Conservation and Diversity
Inhabit(ants) of New York City: High diversity underfoot in urban environments
Cities have more species diversity than you'd expect. A study of ants in Manhattan found not only a wide range of species, but also significant differences in the levels of biodiversity in different urban areas.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Do homing pigeons navigate with gyroscope in brain?
No one knows how homing pigeons do it, but now a team of Swiss and South African scientists have discovered that the bird's navigation is affected by disturbances in gravity, suggesting that they navigate using a gravity map and that they may carry an internal gyroscope to guide them home.
Swiss National Science Foundation, University ofZürich

Contact: Kathryn Knight
kathryn@biologists.com
44-012-234-25525
The Company of Biologists

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
UH receives $1.5 million grant to prepare future cybersecurity workers
With breaches in data on the rise, cybersecurity is a growing concern. The University of Houston has been awarded a $1.5 million CyberCorps grant from the National Science Foundation to train students in this increasingly important area of national security. The congressionally mandated CyberCorps Scholarship for Service program is aimed at increasing and strengthening the cadre of information assurance professionals who protect the government's critical information infrastructure.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bending -- but not breaking -- in search of new materials
Researchers at Drexel University and Dalian University of Technology in China have chemically engineered a new, electrically conductive nanomaterial that is flexible enough to fold, but strong enough to support many times its own weight. They believe it can be used to improve electrical energy storage, water filtration and radiofrequency shielding in technology from portable electronics to coaxial cables.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Britt Faulstick
bef29@drexel.edu
215-895-2617
Drexel University

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Scientists build a better eye on our world
Science begins with observation, and defining moments in scientific progress followed the introduction of new ways to observe the world, from microscopes and telescopes to X-rays and MRIs. The Electronic Visualization Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Chicago has been awarded a $3 million National Science Foundation grant to develop an extraordinary new camera -- really an array of dozens of video cameras -- that can capture images in 360 degrees and three dimensions.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeanne Galatzer-Levy
jgala@uic.edu
312-996-1583
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Journal of Biological Chemistry
MU researchers offer first analysis of new human glucose disorder
Glycogen storage disorders are metabolic conditions that manifest in the first years of life. This inability to process and store glucose can be difficult to diagnose. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri who have studied enzymes involved in metabolism of bacteria have cataloged the effects of abnormal enzymes responsible for one type of this disorder in humans. Their work could help with patient prognosis and in developing therapeutic options for this glycogen storage disease.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
ACS Nano
Microtubes create cozy space for neurons to grow, and grow fast
Tiny, thin microtubes could provide a scaffold for neuron cultures to grow so that researchers can study neural networks, their growth and repair, yielding insights into treatment for degenerative neurological conditions or restoring nerve connections after injury.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Molecular Ecology
Some plants regenerate by duplicating their DNA
When munched by grazing animals -- or mauled by scientists in the lab -- some herbaceous plants overcompensate -- producing more plant matter and becoming more fertile than they otherwise would. Scientists say they now know how these plants accomplish this feat of regeneration.
National Science Foundation, University of Illinois Research Board

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Nature
Supercomputing beyond genealogy reveals surprising European ancestors
Most Europeans today derive from three distinct populations, as evidenced by sequenced genomes of nine ancient remains and 2,345 contemporary humans. Genomic analysis of modern and ancient DNA, combined with archeological evidence is revealing new complexity in human history. Scientists used the NSF XSEDE Stampede supercomputer of the Texas Advanced Computing Center to model and compare genomic data of ancient and modern Europeans.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Faith Singer
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-232-5771
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 11-Nov-2014
Journal of Ecology
Tree diseases can help forests
Plant diseases attack trees and crops and can hurt lumber and food production, but University of Utah biologists found that pathogens that kill tree seedlings actually can make forests more diverse.
Sigma Xi-The Scientific Research Society, Smithsonian Institution, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
21st ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security
Wireless devices used by casual pilots vulnerable to hacking, computer scientists find
A new class of apps and wireless devices used by private pilots during flights for everything from GPS information to data about nearby aircraft is vulnerable to a wide range of security attacks, which in some scenarios could lead to catastrophic outcomes, according to computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego and Johns Hopkins University. They presented their findings Nov. 5 at the 21st ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security in Scottsdale, Ariz.
National Science Foundation, University of San Diego

Contact: Ioana Patringenaru
ipatrin@ucsd.edu
858-822-0899
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study ties conflict risk in sub-Saharan Africa to climate change, economics, geography
A massive new University of Colorado Boulder study indicates there is a statistical link between hotter temperatures generated by climate change and the risk of armed conflicts in sub-Saharan Africa.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John O'Loughlin
johno@colorado.edu
303-492-1619
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
Division of Planetary Science, American Astronomical Society
Astrophysical Journal
Baby photos of a scaled-up solar system
University of Arizona astronomers have discovered two dust belts surrounded by a large dust halo around young star HD 95086. The findings provide a look back at what our solar system may have resembled in its infancy.
NASA, National Science Foundation, Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft -und Raumfahrt

Contact: Daniel Stolte
stolte@email.arizona.edu
520-954-1964
University of Arizona

Public Release: 10-Nov-2014
SwRI-led team telescope effort reveals asteroid's size for the first time
When the double asteroid Patroclus-Menoetius passed directly in front of a star on the night of Oct. 20, a team of volunteer astronomers across the US was waiting.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joe Fohn
jfohn@swri.org
210-522-4630
Southwest Research Institute

Showing releases 176-200 out of 878.

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