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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 226-250 out of 818.

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Public Release: 9-Apr-2015
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A
Amniotic stem cells demonstrate healing potential
Scientists use stem cells derived from amniotic fluid to promote the growth of robust, functional blood vessels in healing hydrogels.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Neuron
What can brain-controlled prosthetics tell us about the brain?
The field of neuroprosthetics has grown significantly over the past two decades thanks to advancements in technology. Karen Moxon, Ph.D., a Drexel University biomedical engineer working at the leading edge of the field contends that these devices are also opening a new portal for researchers to understand how the brain functions.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Britt Faulstick
bef29@drexel.edu
215-895-2617
Drexel University

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Advanced Materials
Inkjet-printed liquid metal could bring wearable tech, soft robotics
New research shows how inkjet-printing technology can be used to mass-produce electronic circuits made of liquid-metal alloys for 'soft robots' and flexible electronics.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
Nature
Scientists predict gradual, prolonged permafrost greenhouse gas emissions
A new scientific synthesis suggests a gradual, prolonged release of greenhouse gases from permafrost soils in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions, which may afford society more time to adapt to environmental changes, say scientists in an April 9 paper published in Nature.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Marie Thoms
methoms@alaska.edu
907-460-1841
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Public Release: 8-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
Bacteria inhibit bat-killing fungus, could combat white-nose syndrome
Bacteria found naturally on some bats may prove useful in controlling the deadly fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome, which has devastated bat populations throughout eastern North America and continues to spread across the continent. Scientists at UC Santa Cruz isolated bacteria that strongly inhibited the growth of the white-nose syndrome fungus in laboratory tests.
US Fish and Wildlife Service, National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Six from CCNY named NSF Graduate Research Fellows
Danielle G. Rivera, a master of Science in biology major at The City College of New York and five recent CCNY graduates have been awarded National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Nature Scientific Reports
Swimming algae offer Penn researchers insights into living fluid dynamics
None of us would be alive if sperm cells didn't know how to swim, or if the cilia in our lungs couldn't prevent fluid buildup. But we know very little about the dynamics of so-called 'living fluids,' those containing cells, microorganisms or other biological structures.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Nature Neuroscience
The rest of the brain gets in the way
In a new study, researchers measured the connections between different brain regions as participants learned to play a simple game. The differences in neural activity between the quickest and slowest learners provide new insight into what is happening in the brain during the learning process and the role that interactions between different regions play. Their findings suggest that recruiting unnecessary parts of the brain for a given task, akin to over-thinking the problem, plays a critical role in this difference.
The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Army Research Laboratory, Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Army Research Office

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
New study hints at spontaneous appearance of primordial DNA
The self-organization properties of DNA-like molecular fragments four billion years ago may have guided their own growth into repeating chemical chains long enough to act as a basis for primitive life, says a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Milan.
Italian Ministries of Education, Universities and Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Noel Clark
noel.clark@colorado.edu
303-492-6420
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Zebrafish
Gotcha! Ultra-realistic robot proves there's more than 1 way to scare a fish
Researchers have published the first study showing that, in a side-by-side comparison, a robotic predator can frighten zebrafish just as well as the real thing. Their results may help advance understanding of fear and anxiety in animal populations, including humans. Zebrafish are increasingly taking the place of more complex animals in behavioral studies. Experiments have shown the advantages of using robots in studies of fish behavior, including repeatability and consistency.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
Nature Communications
Sun experiences seasonal changes, new research finds
The sun undergoes a type of seasonal variability with its activity waxing and waning over the course of nearly two years, new research concludes. This behavior affects the peaks and valleys in the approximately 11-year solar cycle, sometimes amplifying and sometimes weakening the solar storms that can buffet Earth's atmosphere.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Hosansky
hosansky@ucar.edu
303-497-8611
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 7-Apr-2015
eLife
Purging a virus from organ transplants
EPFL scientists have discovered the switch that can awake a dormant cytomegalovirus, a dreadful pathogen in immuno-compromised patients. The switch can be controlled with common drugs, opening a new strategy for purging the virus from organ transplants.
Swiss National Science Foundation, European Research Council

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sound separates cancer cells from blood samples
Separating circulating cancer cells from blood cells for diagnostic, prognostic and treatment purposes may become much easier using an acoustic separation method and an inexpensive, disposable chip, according to a team of engineers.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Nature Nanotechnology
Researchers create first metal-free catalyst for rechargeable zinc-air batteries
Researchers from Case Western Reserve University and the University of North Texas have made what they believe is the first metal-free bifunctional electrocatalyst that performs as well or better than most metal and metal oxide electrodes in zinc-air batteries.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research. National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Biomedical Optics Express
How do you feel? Video of your face may tell all
Rice University researchers are developing a touch-free system that monitors patients' vital signs via video while compensating for skin tone, lighting and movement.
National Science Foundation, Texas Instruments Fellowship, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Rice University

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
BMC Systems Biology
Cells exercise suboptimal strategy to survive
Analysis of suboptimal metabolic pathways gives a more realistic picture of why organisms are able to adapt to new environments, according to researchers at Rice University studying systemic response to hypoxia and exercise.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Ecology Letters
Northern coastal marshes more vulnerable to nutrient pollution
Salt marshes at higher latitudes, including those in densely populated coastal regions of New England and Europe, are more vulnerable to the effects of eutrophication, which, if left unchecked, can trigger intense overgrazing by marsh herbivores that can destabilize marshes and reduce their ability to defend shorelines from erosion. Geography and evolution both play roles in making these marshes more susceptible to nutrient loading and overgrazing than their counterparts in the tropics.
National Science Foundation, Edward S. Stolarz Foundation

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Device extracts rare tumor cells using sound
A simple blood test may one day replace invasive biopsies thanks to a new device that uses sound waves to separate blood-borne cancer cells from white blood cells. Carnegie Mellon University President Subra Suresh and fellow researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and The Pennsylvania State University report the latest advancement that brings their device one step closer to clinical use in a paper published this week in the online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Institutes of Health, Penn State Center for Nano Scale Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Teams with a critical mass of women lets them 'lean in' and aim for science careers
For years, educators and have sounded an alarm about the fact that fewer girls and women enter STEM fields than their male peers, and more girls and women leave. Now a team led by Nilanjana Dasgupta at UMass Amherst reports one promising intervention: women, particularly first-year students, participate more actively and feel less anxious in small groups that are mostly female or that have equal numbers of men and women compared to mostly male groups.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Nature Biotechnology
Pulling the strings of our genetic puppetmasters
Researchers have developed a new method to activate genes by synthetically creating a key component of the epigenome that controls how our genes are expressed. The new technology allows researchers to turn on specific gene promoters and enhancers -- pieces of our genomes that control our genes' activity -- by chemically manipulating proteins that package our DNA.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study of vehicle emissons will aid urban sustainability efforts
Boston University researchers have created DARTE (Database of Road Transportation Emissions), a new nationwide data inventory that can help to provide this crucial information.
NASA, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Kira Jastive
kjastive@bu.edu
617-358-1240
Boston University

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Discovery by Virginia Tech may be breakthrough for hydrogen cars
Unlike other hydrogen fuel production methods that rely on highly processed sugars, the Virginia Tech team used dirty biomass -- the husks and stalks of corn plants -- to create their fuel. This not only reduces the initial expense of creating the fuel, it enables the use of a fuel source readily available near the processing plants, making the creation of the fuel a local enterprise.
Shell GameChanger Initiative, National Science Foundation

Contact: Zeke Barlow
bzeke@vt.edu
540-231-5417
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 6-Apr-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sea sponge anchors are natural models of strength
The Venus' flower basket sea sponge has hair-like appendages that hold it in place on the sea floor. Research led by Brown University engineers shows that the internal structure of those fibers is fine-tuned for strength. The findings from this natural system could inform the engineering of load-bearing structural members.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 3-Apr-2015
PLOS ONE
UCLA research links HIV to age-accelerating cellular changes
People undergoing treatment for HIV-1 have an increased risk for earlier onset of age-related illnesses such as some cancers, renal and kidney disease, frailty, osteoporosis and neurocognitive disease. But is it because of the virus that causes AIDS or the treatment? New research suggests that HIV itself accelerates these aging related changes by more than 14 years.
NIH/National Institute on Aging grant, UCLA AIDS Institute/CFAR seed grant from the National Institutes of Health, NIH T032 training grant, National Science Foundation grant

Contact: Enrique Rivero
erivero@mednet.ucla.edu
310-794-2273
University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

Public Release: 3-Apr-2015
Science
OU physicists first to create new molecule with record-setting dipole moment
A proposed pathway to construct quantum computers may be the outcome of research by a University of Oklahoma physics team that has created a new molecule based on the interaction between a highly-excited type of atom known as a Rydberg atom and a ground-state atom. A unique property of the molecule is the large permanent dipole moment, which reacts with an electric field much like a bar magnet reacts with a magnetic field.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jana Smith
jana.smith@ou.edu
405-325-1322
University of Oklahoma

Showing releases 226-250 out of 818.

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