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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

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Showing releases 26-50 out of 845.

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Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Brain's compass relies on geometric relationships, say Penn Researchers
The brain has a complex system for keeping track of which direction you are facing as you move about; remembering how to get from one place to another would otherwise be impossible. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown how the brain anchors this mental compass. Their findings provide a neurological basis for something that psychologists have long observed about navigational behavior: people use geometrical relationships to orient themselves.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Social Psychological and Personality Science
Executive scandal hurts job prospects even for entry-level employees
There's more bad news for job seekers with a scandal-hit company like Lehman Brothers or Countrywide Mortgage on their résumés. As if it weren't already hard enough to get a new job in this market, people who worked for those companies have tarnished reputations to overcome: New research finds that moral suspicion from higher-ups' wrongdoing spills down to people lower in an organization, even if they did not work directly under the moral transgressor.
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Regina Casper Stanford Graduate Fellowship

Contact: Lisa M.P. Munoz
spps.media@gmail.com
571-354-0754
SAGE Publications

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Science
Protons hog the momentum in neutron-rich nuclei
Protons and neutrons that have briefly paired up in the nucleus have higher-average momentum, leaving less for non-paired nucleons. Researchers have now shown for the first time that this phenomenon exists in nuclei heavier than carbon, including aluminum, iron and lead and also surprisingly allows a greater fraction of protons than neutrons to have high momentum in these neutron-rich nuclei, contrary to long-accepted theories and with implications for ultra-cold atomic gas systems and neutron stars.
DOE/Office of Science, National Science Foundation, Israel Science Foundation, Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Technologica, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

Contact: Kandice Carter
kcarter@jlab.org
757-269-7263
DOE/Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

Public Release: 16-Oct-2014
Current Biology
Are male brains wired to ignore food for sex?
Choosing between two good things can be tough. When animals must decide between feeding and mating, it can get even trickier. In a discovery that might ring true even for some humans, researchers have shown that male brains -- at least in nematodes -- will suppress the ability to locate food in order to instead focus on finding a mate.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation, Human Frontiers Science Program, Autism Speaks

Contact: Mark Michaud
mark_michaud@urmc.rochester.edu
585-273-4790
University of Rochester Medical Center

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Creating medical devices with dissolving metal
University of Pittsburgh researchers recently received another $1.5 million from the National Science Foundation to continue a combined multi-university, private-industry effort to develop implantable medical devices made from biodegradable metals.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joe Miksch
jmiksch@pitt.edu
412-624-4356
University of Pittsburgh

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Fluid Power Innovation and Research Conference
Brain surgery through the cheek
Vanderbilt engineers have developed a surgical robot designed to perform brain surgery by entering through the cheek instead of the skull that can operate on a patient in an MRI scanner.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Getting to know super-earths
Results from NASA's Kepler mission have indicated that the most common planets in the galaxy are super-Earths -- those that are bigger than Earth but smaller than Neptune. We have no examples of these planets in our own solar system, so Heather Knutson, assistant professor of planetary science at Caltech, and her colleagues are using space telescopes to try to find out more about these worlds. Most recently they used Hubble to study the planet HD 97658b, in the constellation Leo.
NASA, National Science Foundation (Graduate Research Fellowship), Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, European Research Council (advanced grant PEPS)

Contact: Brian Bell
bpbell@caltech.edu
626-395-5832
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Journal of Atmospheric Sciences
Weather history time machine
A San Diego State University geography professor, Samuel Shen, and colleagues have developed a software program that allows climate researchers to access historical climate data for the entire global surface (excluding the poles), including the oceans, based on Shen's statistical research into historical climates.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Natalia Elko
natalia.elko@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-2585
San Diego State University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
UTSA awarded $640,000 NSF grant to help economically disadvantaged students pursue science careers
The University of Texas at San Antonio has been awarded a five-year, $640,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to help economically disadvantaged students pursue graduate studies or scientific careers in the workforce.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kris Rodriguez
kris.rodriguez@utsa.edu
210-458-5116
University of Texas at San Antonio

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
A brighter design emerges for low-cost, 'greener' LED light bulbs
The phase-out of traditional incandescent bulbs in the US and elsewhere, as well as a growing interest in energy efficiency, has given light-emitting diode lighting a sales boost. However, that trend could be short-lived as key materials known as rare earth elements become more expensive. Scientists have now designed new materials for making household light-emitting diode bulbs without using these ingredients. They report their development in the American Chemical Society's Journal of the American Chemical Society.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Astronomers spot faraway Uranus-like planet
Our view of other solar systems just got a little more familiar, with the discovery of a planet 25,000 light-years away that resembles our own Uranus.
European Research Council, The Thomas Jefferson Chair for Discovery and Space Exploration, the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education, the National Research Foundation of Korea, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the National Science Foundation

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
Nature
Researchers develop world's thinnest electric generator
Researchers from Columbia Engineering and the Georgia Institute of Technology report today that they have made the first experimental observation of piezoelectricity and the piezotronic effect in an atomically thin material, molybdenum disulfide, MoS2, resulting in a unique electric generator and mechanosensation devices that are optically transparent, extremely light, and very bendable and stretchable.
US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly.evarts@columbia.edu
212-854-3206
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists discover carbonate rocks are unrecognized methane sink
Since the first undersea methane seep was discovered 30 years ago, scientists have meticulously analyzed and measured how microbes in the seafloor sediments consume the greenhouse gas methane. They have now found a type of rock known as authigenic carbonate also contains vast amounts of active microbes that take up methane. This demonstrates that the global methane process is still poorly understood.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andrew Thurber
athurber@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-4500
Oregon State University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
$2.3 million NSF grant will fund MU study of math learning outcomes
Education researchers at the University of Missouri will receive nearly $2.3 million from the National Science Foundation over the next four years to study elementary students' mathematics learning outcomes in relation to teacher expertise and classroom assignment.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jesslyn Chew
ChewJ@missouri.edu
573-882-8353
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
The Anatomical Record
Dinosaur breathing study shows that noses enhanced smelling and cooled brain
It's been millions of years since T. rex took its last breath, but a team led by Ohio University scientists is breathing life back into dinosaurs using high-powered computer simulations to model airflow through dinosaur snouts. The research has important implications for how dinosaurs used their noses to not only breathe but to enhance the sense of smell and cool their brains.
National Science Foundation, Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine

Contact: Andrea Gibson
gibsona@ohio.edu
740-597-2166
Ohio University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
UCI engineers develop prototype of low-cost, disposable lung infection detector
Imagine a low-cost, disposable breath analysis device that a person with cystic fibrosis could use at home along with a smartphone to immediately detect a lung infection, much like the device police use to gauge a driver's blood alcohol level.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lori Brandt
lbrandt@uci.edu
949-824-8306
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Avian Biology
A canary for climate change
Researchers find that wing-propelled diving seabirds, as well as their extinct relatives, may have served as an indicator species for environmental changes and faunal shifts. The findings also elucidate how past extinctions have influenced the modern distribution and population size of existing species.
National Science Foundation, National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, University of Texas at Austin

Contact: Nicole Duncan
nicole.duncan@nescent.org
919-668-7993
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Biology Letters
What goes up must come down
Geckos employ an adhesive system that facilitates their climbing vertically, and even in inverted positions. But can geckos employ this system when moving downhill? Biologists at the University of California, Riverside have conducted lab experiments on geckos to find that when moving on steep downhill surfaces geckos reverse the position of their hind feet to potentially use the adhesive system as a brake and/or stabilizer, resulting in the digits of the hind feet facing backwards.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
UH to develop new wireless communications systems to serve remote and rural areas
Advanced communications technology could bring broadband wireless service to remote and rural areas in the Hawaiian Islands, under a new research grant funded by the National Science Foundation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists link ALS progression to increased protein instability
A new study by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and other institutions suggests a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Institute of Aging, National Science Foundation, TSRI/Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, Buck Institute for Research on Aging

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Nature Physics
Researchers say academia can learn from Hollywood
According to a pair of University of Houston professors and their colleague from the IMT Lucca Institute for Advanced Studies in Italy, while science is increasingly moving in the direction of teamwork and interdisciplinary research, changes need to be made in academia to allow for a more collaborative model to flourish. Their findings are published in the October issue of Nature Physics.
National Science Foundation, Italian National Research Council

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Advanced Functional Materials
Tailored flexible illusion coatings hide objects from detection
Developing the cloak of invisibility would be wonderful, but sometimes simply making an object appear to be something else will do the trick, according to Penn State electrical engineers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Stanford scientists create a 'smart' lithium-ion battery that warns of fire hazard
Stanford University scientists have developed a 'smart' lithium-ion battery that gives ample warning before it overheats and bursts into flames. The new technology is designed for conventional lithium-ion batteries now used in billions of cellphones, laptops and other electronic devices, as well as a growing number of cars and airplanes.
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 12-Oct-2014
Nature Materials
A novel platform for future spintronic technologies
Spintronics is a new field of electronics, using electron spin rather than charge. EPFL scientists, working with the Université Paris-Sud and Paul Scherrer Institut have shown that a conventional electrical insulator can be used as an optimal spintronic device.
French National Research Agency , RTRA–Triangle de la Physique, Swiss National Science Foundation, Institut Universitaire de France

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 10-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Charged graphene gives DNA a stage to perform molecular gymnastics
When Illinois researchers investigated a method to control how DNA moves through a tiny sequencing device, they did not know they were about to witness a display of molecular gymnastics. The researchers found that a positive charge applied to a graphene nanopore speeds up DNA movement, while a negative charge stops the DNA in its tracks. However, the DNA seemed to dance across the graphene surface, pirouetting into sequence-specific shapes they had never seen.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Showing releases 26-50 out of 845.

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