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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 851.

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Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering of the Biomedical Engineering Society
Thomas Gaborski named 2014 Young Innovator by international Biomedical Engineering Society
Thomas Gaborski, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Rochester Institute of Technology, and his research team are developing ways to use ultra-thin nano-membranes and adipose stem cells to create the vascular network necessary in engineering tissue, skin and organs. For his work with thin membranes and cell culture on membranes, Gaborski received the 2014 Young Innovator Award in Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering given by the Biomedical Engineering Society.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michelle Cometa
macuns@rit.edu
585-475-4954
Rochester Institute of Technology

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New paper identifies virus devastating sea stars on Pacific Coast
Specimens from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County have helped explain the mysteriously sudden appearance of a disease that has decimated sea stars on the North American Pacific Coast.
National Science Foundation, Cornell University's David R. Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future

Contact: Kristin Friedrich
kfriedrich@nhm.org
213-763-3532
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Biomicrofluidics
New advance in cryopreservation could change management of world blood supplies
Engineers have identified a method to rapidly prepare frozen red blood cells for transfusions, which may offer an important new way to manage the world's blood supply.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Adam Higgins
adam.higgins@oregonstate.edu
541-737-4600
Oregon State University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Why lizards have bird breath
Biologists long assumed that one-way air flow was a special adaptation in birds driven by the intense energy demands of flight. But now University of Utah scientists have shown that bird-like breathing also developed in green iguanas -- reptiles not known for high-capacity aerobic fitness. The finding bolsters the case that unidirectional bird-like flow evolved long before the first birds.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joe Rojas
joe.rojas@utah.edu
801-585-6861
University of Utah

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Tiny fish provides giant insight into how organisms adapt to changing environment
An Indiana University-Dartmouth College team has identified genes and regulatory patterns that allow some organisms to alter their body form in response to environmental change.
NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Hanchett
jimhanch@indiana.edu
812-856-5490
Indiana University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Researchers create & control spin waves, lifting prospects for enhanced info processing
A team of NYU and University of Barcelona physicists has developed a method to control the movements occurring within magnetic materials, which are used to store and carry information. The breakthrough could simultaneously bolster information processing while reducing the energy necessary to do so.
National Science Foundation, Army Research Office, US Department of Energy

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Major brain pathway rediscovered after century-old confusion, controversy
Researchers recently rediscovered a mysterious major brain pathway that had long been absent from anatomy textbooks. Their findings are being published Nov. 17 by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Deborah Bach
bach2@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Evolutionary constraints revealed in diversity of fish skulls
In the aquatic environment, suction feeding is far more common than biting as a way to capture prey. A new study shows that the evolution of biting behavior in eels led to a remarkable diversification of skull shapes, indicating that the skull shapes of most fish are limited by the structural requirements for suction feeding.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scripps Research Institute scientists reveal weak spots in Ebola's defenses
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified weak spots on the surface of Ebola virus that are targeted by the antibodies in ZMapp, the experimental drug cocktail administered to several patients during the recent Ebola outbreak.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation, Ray Thomas Edwards Foundation, Burroughs Welcome Fund

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 17-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Subtle shifts in the Earth could forecast earthquakes, tsunamis
Earthquakes and tsunamis can be giant disasters no one sees coming, but now an international team of scientists led by a University of South Florida professor have found that subtle shifts in the earth's offshore plates can be a harbinger of the size of the disaster.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Dixon
thd@usf.edu
305-323-1820
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Rutgers engineers create smartphone app to cut risk of power outages
An easy-to-use smartphone app developed by Rutgers engineers will help keep the lights on in a heavily wooded New Jersey suburb that suffered widespread power outages during Superstorm Sandy. Volunteers in Warren Township used smartphones running the app to document 351 vulnerable spots along 317 miles of wire. The township presented these results to the utilities, which corrected the problems before the 2014 hurricane season.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Carl Blesch
cblesch@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 14-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
New form of crystalline order holds promise for thermoelectric applications
A team of researchers from Vanderbilt University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory reports that it has discovered an entirely new form of crystalline order that simultaneously exhibits both crystal and polycrystalline properties and holds promise for improving the efficiency of thermoelectric devices.
National Science Foundation, United States Department of Energy

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Wearable tech for the battlefield and people at risk for heart attacks
Wearable devices can count the steps you take and the calories you burn. But can they help soldiers in the field? Or prevent someone from having a heart attack? Researchers at Sentient Science and the University at Buffalo say yes.
Office of Naval Research Small Business Technology Transfer Program

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Symbiotic plants are more diverse, finds new study
A new study published in PNAS finds that when plants develop mutually beneficial relationships with animals, mainly insects, those plant families become more diverse by evolving into more species over time.
National Science Foundation, John Templeton Foundation, Society for the Study of Evolution

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
2014 IEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS)
Cats and athletes teach robots to fall
Georgia Tech studies mid-air orientation and impact behavior in both cats and humans as it applies to reduced impact in falling robots, especially those that one day may be used for search-and-rescue missions in hazardous conditions.
National Science Foundation, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Phillip Taylor
ptaylor@cc.gatech.edu
404-894-7253
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
ACS Nano
New way to move atomically thin semiconductors for use in flexible devices
Researchers have developed a new way to transfer thin semiconductor films, which are only one atom thick, onto arbitrary substrates, paving the way for flexible computing or photonic devices.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Current Biology
For female chimpanzees, no consent agreement
In the animal kingdom, the battle of the sexes often truly becomes a battle. Among chimpanzees, males may violently attack females, sometimes resulting in serious wounds. While unpleasant to watch, the frequent occurrence of such violence at several East African field sites suggests that aggression toward females functions as a form of sexual coercion.
Jane Goodall Institute, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, University of Minnesota, Harris Steel Group, Windibrow Foundation, Carnegie Corporation

Contact: Ian Gilby
ian.gilby@asu.edu
480-965-3807
Arizona State University

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Science
Lightning expected to increase by 50 percent with global warming
UC Berkeley atmospheric scientist David Romps and his colleagues looked at predictions of precipitation and cloud buoyancy in 11 different climate models and concluded that their combined effect will generate 50 percent more electrical discharges to the ground by the end of the century because of global warming. The main cause is water vapor, which fuels explosive deep convection in the atmosphere. The more convection, the greater the charge separation and the more cloud-to-ground strikes.
Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Science
Pulling together the early solar system
A new study finds that a strong magnetic field whipped the early solar system into shape.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 13-Nov-2014
Current Biology
Male bullies father more chimpanzees
In a long-term study of interactions between chimpanzees in the famous Gombe National Park in Tanzania, researchers have found that males who consistently bully females tend to father more babies with their victims.
Jane Goodall Institute, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Carnegie Corporation, University of Minnesota, Duke University, Harris Steel Group, Windibrow Foundation

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Evolution and Human Behavior
Did men evolve navigation skills to find mates?
A University of Utah study of two African tribes found evidence that men evolved better navigation ability than women because men with better spatial skills - the ability to mentally manipulate objects -- can roam farther and have children with more mates.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Nature
A piece of the quantum puzzle
While the Martinis Lab at UC Santa Barbara has been focusing on quantum computation, former postdoctoral fellow Pedram Roushan and several colleagues have been exploring qubits (quantum bits) for quantum simulation on a smaller scale. Their research appears in the current edition of the journal Nature.
National Science Foundation, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Astrophysical Journal
Primordial galaxy bursts with starry births
Peering deep into time with one of the world's newest, most sophisticated telescopes, astronomers have found a galaxy -- AzTEC-3 -- that gives birth annually to 500 times the number of suns as the Milky Way galaxy, according to a new Cornell University-led study published Nov. 10 in the Astrophysical Journal.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Rice University program models more detailed evolutionary networks from genetic data
Rice University computer scientists develop software to build more accurate evolutionary networks from genomic data sets.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Library of Medicine, Keck Center of the Gulf Coast Consortia

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 12-Nov-2014
Journal of Neurolinguistics
Learning languages is a workout for brains, both young and old
Learning a new language changes your brain network both structurally and functionally, according to Penn State researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Victoria M. Indivero
vmi1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Showing releases 26-50 out of 851.

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