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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 878.

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Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Genome Medicine
People may inherit 'gut' bacteria that cause Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis
A new study by an international team of researchers shows for the first time that people may inherit some of the intestinal bacteria that cause Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively know as inflammatory bowel disease.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of Canada

Contact: Rhonda Zurn
rzurn@umn.edu
612-626-7959
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
New tracers can identify coal ash contamination in water
Laboratory and field tests confirm that new boron and strontium tracers, developed by researchers at Duke, the University of Arkansas-Little Rock, and the University of Kentucky, can detect the distinctive isotopic and geochemical fingerprints of coal ash contamination in water. The tracers will allow the US Environmental Protection Agency and other regulators to distinguish coal ash contamination from other, similar contamination coming from different sources in a watershed, and trace the coal ash to its source.
National Science Foundation, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Duke University Nicholas School of the Environment

Contact: Tim Lucas
tdlucas@duke.edu
919-613-8084
Duke University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Carbon-trapping 'sponges' can cut greenhouse gases
In the fight against global warming, carbon capture -- chemically trapping carbon dioxide before it releases into the atmosphere -- is gaining momentum, but standard methods are plagued by toxicity, corrosiveness and inefficiency. Using a bag of chemistry tricks, Cornell materials scientists have invented low-toxicity, highly effective carbon-trapping 'sponges' that could lead to increased use of the technology.
National Science Foundation, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Qatar University

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Scientists trace nanoparticles from plants to caterpillars
In one of the most comprehensive studies of its kind, Rice University scientists tracked uptake and accumulation of quantum dot nanoparticles from water to plant roots, plant leaves and leaf-eating caterpillars. The research is available online in Environmental Science & Technology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Dec-2014
Zhang receives CAREER Award from National Science Foundation
Engineers design metabolic pathways in cells to convert cheap raw materials into useful chemicals, biofuels and pharmaceuticals, but it's a delicate balance of systems for that to happen. Fuzhong Zhang, Ph.D., assistant professor of energy, environmental and chemical engineering, will study these systems with a prestigious five-year, $605,000 Faculty Early Career Development Award from the National Science Foundation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie Flory
julie.flory@wustl.edu
314-935-5408
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Journal of Archaeological Science
Dental plaque reveals key plant in prehistoric Easter Island diet
A University of Otago, New Zealand, Ph.D. student analyzing dental calculus from ancient teeth is helping resolve the question of what plant foods Easter Islanders relied on before European contact.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Monica Tromp
monica.tromp@anatomy.otago.ac.nz
University of Otago

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Psychological Science
Cake or carrots? Timing may decide what you'll nosh on
When you open the refrigerator for a late-night snack, are you more likely to grab a slice of chocolate cake or a bag of carrot sticks? Your ability to exercise self-control -- i.e., to settle for the carrots -- may depend upon just how quickly your brain factors healthfulness into a decision, according to a recent study by Caltech neuroeconomists.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Aging, Lipper Foundation

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Climatic Change
Climate change could leave cities more in the dark
Cities like Miami are all too familiar with hurricane-related power outages. But a Johns Hopkins University analysis finds climate change will give other major metro areas a lot to worry about in future storms.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jill Rosen
jrosen@jhu.edu
443-997-9906
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Team led by Louisiana Tech University biomed professor receives NSF funding
National Science Foundation funding to develop and commercialize artificially manufactured cells and cell platforms for educational, research and industry application has been awarded to a team of scientists led by Dr. Mark DeCoster, the James E. Wyche III Professor in Biomedical Engineering at Louisiana Tech University.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dave Guerin
dguerin@latech.edu
318-257-4854
Louisiana Tech University

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Nature Materials
Molecular 'hats' allow in vivo activation of disguised signaling peptides
When someone you know is wearing an unfamiliar hat, you might not recognize them. Georgia Institute of Technology researchers are using just such a disguise to sneak biomaterials containing peptide signaling molecules into living animals.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Research links soil mineral surfaces to key atmospheric processes
Research by Indiana University scientists finds that soil may be a significant and underappreciated source of nitrous acid, a chemical that plays a pivotal role in atmospheric processes such as the formation of smog and determining the lifetime of greenhouse gases.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Promising new method for rapidly screening cancer drugs
Traditional genomic, proteomic and other screening methods currently used to characterize drug mechanisms are time-consuming and require special equipment, but now researchers led by chemist Vincent Rotello at the University of Massachusetts Amherst offer a multi-channel sensor method using gold nanoparticles that can accurately profile various anti-cancer drugs and their mechanisms in minutes.
NIH/Institute for General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation's Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing at UMass Amherst.

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Nature Genetics
Algorithm identifies networks of genetic changes across cancers
Using a computer algorithm that can sift through mounds of genetic data, researchers from Brown University have identified several networks of genes that, when hit by a mutation, could play a role in the development of multiple types of cancer. The researchers hope the new genetic insights might aid in the development of new drugs and treatment approaches for cancer.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 15-Dec-2014
Nature Geoscience
Past global warming similar to today's
The rate at which carbon emissions warmed Earth's climate almost 56 million years ago resembles modern, human-caused global warming much more than previously believed, but involved two pulses of carbon to the atmosphere, University of Utah researchers and their colleagues found.
National Science Foundation, German Research Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 12-Dec-2014
Science
Earth's most abundant mineral finally has a name
An ancient meteorite and high-energy X-rays have helped scientists conclude a half century of effort to find, identify and characterize a mineral that makes up 38 percent of the Earth.
US Department of Energy, NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Science
Slow rate of croc mutation revealed in major Science study
In research led by Texas Tech Uni a team of researchers from the University of Sydney's Faculty of Veterinary Science has sequenced three crocodilians species and revealed that their rate of evolution is approximately four times slower than birds.'
Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation grant, US National Science Foundation

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
61-403-067-342
University of Sydney

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Science
Scientists reveal new family tree for birds, clear back to dinosaur parents
A large international group of scientists, including an Oregon Health & Science University neuroscientist, is publishing this week the results of a first-ever look at the genome of dozens of common birds. The scientists' research tells the story of how modern birds evolved after the mass extinction that wiped out dinosaurs and almost everything else on Earth 66 million years ago, and gives new details on how birds came to have feathers, flight and song.
National Genebank in China, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Lundbeck Foundation, Danish National Research Foundation

Contact: Todd Murphy
murphyt@ohsu.edu
503-494-8231
Oregon Health & Science University

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Science
Nanoshaping method points to future manufacturing technology
A new method that creates large-area patterns of 3-D nanoshapes from metal sheets represents a potential manufacturing system to inexpensively mass produce innovations such as 'plasmonic metamaterials' for advanced technologies.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institutes of Health, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Physical Review Letters
Penn research outlines basic rules for construction with a type of origami
Origami is capable of turning a simple sheet of paper into a pretty paper crane, but the principles behind it can be applied to making a microfluidic device or for storing a satellite's solar panel in a rocket's cargo bay. A team of University of Pennsylvania researchers is turning kirigami, a related art form that allows the paper to be cut, into a technique that can be applied equally to structures on those vastly divergent length scales.
National Science Foundation, American Philosophical Society, Simons Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Monthly Notices of Royal Astronomical Society
Interstellar mystery solved by supercomputer simulations
An interstellar mystery of why stars form has been solved thanks to the most realistic supercomputer simulations of galaxies yet made. Theoretical astrophysicist Philip Hopkins of the California Institute of Technology led research that found that stellar activity -- like supernova explosions or even just starlight -- plays a big part in the formation of other stars and the growth of galaxies.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, NASA Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Jorge Salazar
jorge@tacc.utexas.edu
512-475-9411
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Cell
3-D maps reveal the genome's origami code
In a triumph for cell biology, researchers have assembled the first high-resolution, 3-D maps of entire folded genomes and found a structural basis for gene regulation -- a kind of 'genomic origami' that allows the same genome to produce different types of cells. The research appears online today in Cell.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, NVIDIA, IBM, Google, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, McNair Medical Institute

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics
Study: Invasive species can dramatically alter landscapes
Invasive plant and animal species can cause dramatic and enduring changes to the geography and ecology of landscapes, a study from Purdue University and the University of Kentucky shows.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
nvanhoos@purdue.edu
765-496-2050
Purdue University

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Nano Letters
Stacking 2-dimensional materials may lower cost of semiconductor devices
A team of researchers has found that stacking materials that are only one atom thick can create semiconductor junctions that transfer charge efficiently, regardless of whether the crystalline structure of the materials is mismatched -- lowering the manufacturing cost for a wide variety of semiconductor devices such as solar cells, lasers and LEDs.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Current Biology
The story of a bizarre deep-sea bone worm takes an unexpected twist
Marine biologist Greg Rouse at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and his colleagues have discovered a new species of bizarre deep-sea worms that feast on the bones of dead animals. The new 'bone worm' was found to be an evolutionary reversal of size unseen in the animal kingdom.
David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, National Science Foundation, Faculty of Science at the University of Copenhagen.

Contact: Mario Aguilera or Robert Monroe
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 11-Dec-2014
Kent State researchers to study social media use during crises and disasters
The National Science Foundation has awarded Kent State University a $300,000 grant for three College of Arts and Sciences faculty members to study how human dynamics across social media and social networks can be modeled. The grant is part of a $999,887 collaboration with San Diego State University and the University of Arkansas.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Maxwell
jmaxwel2@kent.edu
330-672-8028
Kent State University

Showing releases 26-50 out of 878.

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