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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 952.

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Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
Risk Analysis
How to sound the alarm
A group of risk experts is proposing a new framework and research agenda that they believe will support the most effective public warnings when a hurricane, wildfire, toxic chemical spill or any other environmental hazard threatens safety. Effective warnings are a growing need as expanding global populations confront a wide range of hazards.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Paul Gabrielsen
paul.gabrielsen@utah.edu
801-505-8253
University of Utah

Public Release: 26-Jul-2016
American Naturalist
Sexual rivalry may drive frog reproductive behaviors
Biologists have long thought that some frogs evolved to mate on land instead of in water to better guard eggs and tadpoles from predation. New research by a team of US and Brazilian biologists suggests that mating on land in many species might be a strategy male frogs use to ensure that their own DNA gets passed on, instead of their rivals'. Sexual selection may trump natural selection in the evolution of these reproductive behaviors.
National Science Foundation, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico, São Paulo Research Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
Water Resources Research
Measure of age in soil nitrogen could help precision agriculture
What's good for crops is not always good for the environment. Nitrogen, a key nutrient for plants, can cause problems when it leaches into water supplies. University of Illinois engineers developed a model to calculate the age of nitrogen in corn and soybean fields, which could lead to improved fertilizer application techniques to promote crop growth while reducing leaching.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Liz Ahlberg Touchstone
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
IEEE Electron Device Letters
Chemical etching method helps transistors stand tall
University of Illinois researchers have developed a way to etch very tall, narrow finFETs, a type of transistor that forms a tall semiconductor 'fin' for the current to travel over.
National Science Foundation, International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research, Lam Research

Contact: Liz Ahlberg Touchstone
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
Nature Communications
Enhancing molecular imaging with light
A new technology platform from Northwestern University is able to image molecules at the nanoscale with super-resolution.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
Nature
DNA analyses reveal genetic identities of world's first farmers
Conducting the first large-scale, genome-wide analyses of ancient human remains from the Near East, an international team led by Harvard Medical School has illuminated the genetic identities and population dynamics of the world's first farmers.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, European Research Council

Contact: Ekaterina Pesheva
ekaterina_pesheva@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-0441
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
How to build a new brand of engineer
The National Science Foundation is providing $2 million to support the creation of a new curriculum model to prepare a diverse range of students to become adaptive engineers ready to solve 21st century problems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Susan Bland
subland@vt.edu
540-231-1986
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
Nature Energy
New lithium-oxygen battery greatly improves energy efficiency, longevity
A new kind of lithium-oxygen battery developed at MIT, using glass nanoparticles of lithium oxides, could provide more energy, and much better stability and energy efficiency
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New theory explains how beta waves arise in the brain
In the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team led by Brown University neuroscientists proposes a new theory -- backed by data from people, animal models and computational simulation -- to explain how beta waves emerge in the brain.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 25-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Before animals, evolution waited eons to inhale
Time to smash the beaker when thinking about oxygen concentrations in water, at the time when animal life first evolved. Oceans stacked O2 here and deplete it there, as this novel model demonstrates. It may well toss a wrench into the way we have dated the evolution of the earliest animals.
National Science Foundation, NASA/Astrobiology Institute

Contact: Ben Brumfield
ben.brumfield@comm.gatech.edu
404-660-1408
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 23-Jul-2016
UA organic semiconductor research could boost electronics
A team of UA researchers in engineering and chemistry has received $590,000 from the National Science Foundation to enhance the effectiveness of organic semiconductors for making ultrathin and flexible optoelectronics like OLED displays for TVs and mobile phones.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jill Goetz
jgoetz@email.arizona.edu
520-621-1992
University of Arizona College of Engineering

Public Release: 22-Jul-2016
After the quake -- data can help predict consequences of the next event
Seismology geophysicist Steve Roecker is using a network of broadband seismometers to learn more about the complex overlap between tectonic plates that causes an 8.3 magnitude earthquake near Illapel, Chile in 2015.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Mary Martialay
martim12@rpi.edu
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
PLOS Genetics
Penn study models how the immune system might evolve to conquer HIV
In a new paper in PLOS Genetics, University of Pennsylvania professor Joshua Plotkin, along with postdoctoral researcher Jakub Otwinowski and Princeton University research scholar Armita Nourmohammad, mathematically modeled the coevolutionary processes that describe how antibodies and viruses interact and adapt to one another over the course of a chronic infection, such as HIV/AIDS.
National Science Foundation, James S. McDonnell Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, US Army Research Office, US Department of Interior

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Scientific Reports
Trees' surprising role in the boreal water cycle quantified
This is the first study to show that deciduous tree water uptake of snowmelt water represents a large but overlooked aspect of the water balance in boreal watersheds. For the boreal forest of Alaska and Western Canada, this equates to about 17-20 billion cubic meters of water per year. That is roughly equivalent to 8-10 percent of the Yukon River's annual discharge.
US Geological Survey, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Alaska Climate Science Center

Contact: Kristin Timm
kmtimm@alaska.edu
907-474-7064
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Behavioral Ecology
Temperature helps drive the emergence of different personalities in spiders
Not a single aggressive spider was able to reproduce at 93 degrees Fahrenheit and most of them died at that temperature. But when Ingley and his team added docile spiders to the mix, the aggressive spiders thrived in that diverse community at that temperature.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Thania Benios
tgb2103@gmail.com
917-930-5988
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Physical Review D
New detector at South Pole shows early success at neutrino hunting
The Askaryan Radio Array team recently published a performance review of the first two stations to come online, showing great potential for the detector to push forward understanding of the cosmos once it's fully operational.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
brendan@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
CCNY research gleans climate change insight from lizard genome
Using genomic data from three lizard species, City College of New York-led researchers gleaned insights not available before on the impact of climate change on the distribution of animal populations in South American forests. The findings improve ways of modeling the distribution of biodiversity in the past and future.
National Science Foundation, FAPESP, NASA

Contact: Patricia Reilly
preilly@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7615
City College of New York

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Pitt receives NSF grant to study how aluminum alloy microstructures form in real time
A grant from the National Science Foundation will enable researchers at the University of Pittsburgh to utilize a one-of-a-kind transmission electron microscope developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to examine in real time how microstructures form in metals and alloys as they solidify after laser beam melting.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Paul Kovach
pkovach@pitt.edu
412-624-0265
University of Pittsburgh

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Advanced Materials
Artificial muscle for soft robotics: Low voltage, high hopes
Now, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a dielectric elastomer with a broad range of motion that requires relatively low voltage and no rigid components. This type of actuator could be used in everything from wearable devices to soft grippers, laparoscopic surgical tools, entirely soft robots or artificial muscles in more complex robotics.
National Science Foundation, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Link Foundation Fellowship

Contact: Leah Burrows
lburrows@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-1351
Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Psychological Science
Watching the brain do math
A new Carnegie Mellon University neuroimaging study reveals the mental stages people go through as they are solving challenging math problems. Insights from this new work may eventually be applied to the design of more effective classroom instruction -- particularly in the form of improving cognitive tutors by creating models that match the brain activation and thinking patterns used to solve these problems.
National Science Foundation, James S. McDonnell Foundation

Contact: Shilo Rea
shilo@cmu.edu
412-268-6094
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Nature Materials
Self-organizing smart materials that mimic swarm behavior
An international team of researchers has successfully demonstrated the self-organizing pattern formation in active materials at microscale with computer simulations.
Korean Institute for Basic Science, US Department of Energy, Northwestern's Materials Research Center, and National Science Foundation

Contact: JooHyeon Heo
joohyeonheo@unist.ac.kr
82-522-171-223
Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Psychological Science
Distinct stages of thinking revealed by brain activity patterns
Neuroimaging data can reveal the mental stages people go through as they are solving challenging math problems, according to a new study published in Psychological Science. By combining two analytical strategies, researchers were able to use functional MRI to identify patterns of brain activity that aligned with four distinct stages of problem solving.
National Science Foundation, James S. McDonnell Foundation

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
IDM2016, Identification of Dark Matter
World's most sensitive dark matter detector completes search
The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter experiment, which, with the help of Berkeley Lab researchers, operates beneath a mile of rock at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in the Black Hills of South Dakota, has completed its search for the missing matter of the universe. At a meeting in the UK, LUX scientific collaborators presented the results from the detector's final 20-month run.
DOE/Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Dan Krotz
dakrotz@lbl.gov
510-486-4019
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Science
Unconventional quasiparticles predicted in conventional crystals
An international team of researchers has predicted the existence of several previously unknown types of quantum particles in materials. The research represents the newest avenue in the physics of 'topological materials,' an area of science that has already fundamentally changed the way researchers see and interpret states of matter.
US Army Research Office Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative, US Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, W. M. Keck Foundation, Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness

Contact: Catherine Zandonella
czandone@princeton.edu
609-258-0541
Princeton University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2016
Science
Yeast emerges as hidden third partner in lichen symbiosis
For nearly 150 years, lichens have been the model organisms of symbiosis. Now researchers have uncovered an unexpected third partner embedded in the lichen cortex or 'skin' -- yeast.
University of Montana, Austrian Science Fund, National Science Foundation, NASA/Astrobiology Institute, Stiftelsen Oscar och Lili Lammes minne

Contact: Natalie van Hoose
nvanhoos@purdue.edu
765-496-2050
Purdue University

Showing releases 26-50 out of 952.

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