National Science Foundation
Search NSF News:
 
{NSF_SLIDER}
NSF Main
NSF News
NSF Funded Research News
 
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 
At nsf.gov
Contacts Page
Multimedia Gallery
Media Advisories
Publications
Special Reports
Awards Search
Science & Engineering Stats
NSF & Congress
About NSF
RSS Feed RSS Feed
Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 26-50 out of 822.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 ]

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing
OU student use nation's weather radar network to track bird migration at night
Using the nation's weather radar network, two University of Oklahoma doctoral students have developed a technique for forecasting something other than the weather: the orientation behavior of birds as they migrate through the atmosphere at night. The students have discovered a way to use the latest dual-polarization radar upgrade to measure broad-scale flight orientation of nocturnal migrant birds -- a promising development for biologists and bird enthusiasts.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Jana Smith
jana.smith@ou.edu
405-325-1322
University of Oklahoma

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Stuck on you: Research shows fingerprint accuracy stays the same over time
Fingerprints have been used by law enforcement and forensics experts to successfully identify people for more than 100 years. Though fingerprints are assumed to be infallible personal identifiers, there has been little scientific research to prove this claim to be true. As such, there have been repeated challenges to the admissibility of fingerprint evidence in courts of law.
National Science Foundation Center for Identification Technology Research

Contact: Kim Ward
kim.ward@cabs.msu.edu
517-432-0117
Michigan State University

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Biological Chemistry
OU professor developing vaccine to protect global communities from malaria
An OU professor studying malaria mosquito interaction has discovered a new mosquito protein for the development of a vaccine that is expected to stop the spread of the disease in areas where it is considered endemic. Malaria is transmitted by mosquitoes, and it infects millions of people in Africa, Asia and South America every year, causing a global health crisis. Local populations, US military personnel stationed in these areas and travelers to these malaria-prone areas are at risk of becoming infected.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology

Contact: Jana Smith
jana.smith@ou.edu
405-325-1322
University of Oklahoma

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Atmospheric mysteries unraveling
It's been difficult to explain patterns of toxic mercury in some parts of the world, such as why there's so much of the toxin deposited into ecosystems from the air in the southeastern United States, even upwind of usual sources. Now, a new analysis led by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder shows that one key to understanding mercury's strange behavior may be the unexpected reactivity of naturally occurring halogen compounds from the ocean.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Katy Human
kathleen.human@colorado.edu
303-735-0196
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Picturing the forecast: NWS graphics developed with NCAR research
The National Weather Service this summer is introducing new online forecasts based on research by a team of risk communication experts at NCAR. The new graphics will better communicate local forecasts and potential weather threats for the millions of Americans who rely on the NWS website.
National Weather Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Hosansky
hosansky@ucar.edu
303-497-8611
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Environmental Science & Technology
Recent mercury pollution on the rise, but quick to change, Dartmouth-led study shows
A Dartmouth-led study using a 600-year-old ice core shows that global mercury pollution increased dramatically during the 20th century, but that mercury concentrations in the atmosphere decreased faster than previously thought beginning in the late 1970s when emissions started to decline.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Journal of Biomedical Informatics
New role for Twitter: Early warning system for bad drug interactions
Vermont scientists have invented a new technique for discovering potentially dangerous drug interactions and unknown side-effects -- before they show up in medical databases like PubMed -- by searching millions of tweets on Twitter.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
AMBIO
Food for thought: Use more forages in livestock farming
Small-scale livestock farming in the tropics can become more intensive yet sustainable if more and better forage is used to feed the animals being reared. This could benefit farming endeavors in rural South Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, Central America and the Caribbean, and see a move away from the increased reliance on grain-based feeds, say scientists at CIAT (International Center for Tropical Agriculture) and Thomas Rudel of Rutgers University in the US, in Springer's journal Ambio.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Stefanie Eggert
stefanie.eggert@springer.com
49-622-148-78414
Springer

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
PLOS Pathogens
TSRI and biotech partners find new antibody weapons against Marburg virus
A new study led by scientists at the Scripps Research Institute identifies new immune molecules that protect against deadly Marburg virus, a relative of Ebola virus. The research provides ingredients needed to develop treatments for future Marburg outbreaks.
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Science Foundation, Japan Society for Promotion of Science, Uehara Memorial Foundation, Investigators in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease etc.

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers discover how petunias know when to smell good
A team of UW biologists has identified a key mechanism plants use to decide when to release their floral scents to attract pollinators. Their findings, published the week of June 29 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, connect the production and release of these fragrant chemicals to the innate circadian rhythms that pulse through all life on Earth.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: James Urton
jurton@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015
Nature Geoscience
Earthquake not to blame for Indonesian mud volcano
New research led by the University of Adelaide hopes to close the debate on whether a major mud volcano disaster in Indonesia was triggered by an earthquake or had man-made origins.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Mark Tingay
mark.tingay@adelaide.edu.au
61-041-789-9634
University of Adelaide

Public Release: 26-Jun-2015
Nature Communications
A 'hydrothermal siphon' drives water circulation through the seafloor
Vast quantities of ocean water circulate through the seafloor, flowing through the volcanic rock of the upper oceanic crust. A new study by scientists at UC Santa Cruz, published June 26 in Nature Communications, explains what drives this global process and how the flow is sustained.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Physiology & Behavior
Exercising early in life yields rewards in adult years
What impact can exercise done early in life have on the propensity for exercising during the adult years? Researchers at the University of California, Riverside did experiments on mice in the lab to find out. They found that early-age exercise in mice has positive effects on adult levels of voluntary exercise in addition to reducing body mass -- results that may have relevance for the public policy debates concerning the importance of physical education for children.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Ecological Applications
Some forestlands cool climate better without trees, Dartmouth-led study finds
Forests worldwide are increasingly used to store carbon as a way to slow climate change, but a Dartmouth-led study finds that some wooded areas may be more valuable without trees, allowing the cleared landscape to reflect rather than absorb the sun's energy. In other words, it's better to have snow-covered ground act as a natural mirror if you want to use some forest lands to cool the climate.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Cramer
john.cramer@dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Science
Backward-moving glacier helps scientists explain glacial earthquakes
New insight into glacier behavior will improve the reliability of models that predict future sea-level rise in a warming climate.
UK Natural Environment Research Council, US National Science Foundation, Climate Change Consortium of Wales and Thales UK

Contact: Kevin Sullivan
k.g.sullivan@swansea.ac.uk
44-179-251-3245
Newcastle University

Public Release: 25-Jun-2015
Science
Corals are already adapting to global warming, scientists say
Some coral populations already have genetic variants necessary to tolerate warm ocean waters, and humans can help to spread these genes, a team of scientists from The University of Texas at Austin, the Australian Institute of Marine Science and Oregon State University have found.
National Science Foundation, Australian Institute of Marine Science

Contact: Christine Sinatra
christine.sinatra@austin.utexas.edu
512-471-4641
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
Nature Materials
Research findings point way to designing crack-resistant metals
Discoveries by an ASU engineering research team about the causes of stress-corrosion cracking in metal alloys could help prevent failure of critical infrastructure systems such as pipelines that transport water, fossil fuels and natural gas, as well as operating systems for nuclear power generation facilities and the framework of aircraft.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joe Kullman
joe.kullman@asu.edu
480-965-8122
Arizona State University

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
Physical Review Letters
Spintronics advance brings wafer-scale quantum devices closer to reality
University of Chicago researchers have made a crucial step toward nuclear spintronic technologies. They have gotten nuclear spins to line themselves up in a consistent, controllable way, and they have done it using a high-performance material that is practical, convenient, and inexpensive.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation, Knut & Alice Wallenberg Foundation, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Sweden's National Supercomputer Center

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
International Education Data Mining Society's annual meeting
Challenging negative stereotypes to narrow the achievement gap
A writing intervention linked to improved academic performance among girls and minorities may work by triggering a sense of belonging, helping to ease the students' anxiety, say Columbia researchers. They are the first to apply text-mining techniques to analyze the content of experimental essays showing that some students do better in school when asked to write about values important to them.
National Science Foundation, Columbia's Office of the Provost

Contact: Kim Martineau
klm32@columbia.edu
646-717-0134
Columbia University

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
ACS Nano
Giving atoms their marching orders
Building self-assembled 'molecular straws' from bis-urea macrocycles, Linda Shimizu of the University of South Carolina has developed a new nanotube system that can be used to directly compare single-file diffusion dynamics with Fickian diffusion dynamics. She and co-author Russ Bowers of the University of Florida use hyperpolarized xenon-129 NMR to study gas transport dynamics in two highly homogeneous nanotubes, one with a narrow-bore, hollow interior that can accommodate xenon gas atoms only in single file.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Steven Powell
spowell2@mailbox.sc.edu
803-777-1923
University of South Carolina

Public Release: 24-Jun-2015
IEEE Power & Energy Society General Meeting
Distributed technique for power 'scheduling' advances smart grid concept
Researchers have developed a new technique for 'scheduling' energy in electric grids that moves away from centralized management by tapping into the distributed computing power of energy devices. The approach advances the smart grid concept by coordinating the energy being produced and stored by both conventional and renewable sources.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Cell Transplantation
Stem cell injections improve diabetic neuropathy in animal models
Rats modeled with diabetic neuropathy were randomly assigned to BM-MSC or saline injection 12 weeks after diabetes modeling to investigate whether local transplantation could attenuate or reverse experimental DN. The study provided the first evidence that intramuscular injected BM-MSCs migrated to nerves and increased angiogenic and neurotrophic factors associated with blood vessel growth, aiding the survival of nerves. Results suggested that BM-MSC transplantation restored both the myelin sheath and nerve cells in sciatic nerves.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation-Emergent Behavior of Integrated Cellular Systems

Contact: Robert Miranda
cogcomm@aol.com
Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Green Chemistry
Biomanufacturing of CdS quantum dots
A team of Lehigh University engineers have demonstrated a bacterial method for the low-cost, environmentally friendly synthesis of aqueous soluble quantum dot nanocrystals at room temperature.
National Science Foundation's Division of Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation, Lehigh University's Faculty Innovation Grant and Collaborative Research Opportunity Grant programs

Contact: Jordan Reese
jor310@lehigh.edu
610-758-6656
Lehigh University

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
How will cold-loving Antarctic fish respond to warming ocean waters?
Climate change will be a real shock to Antarctic fishes' physiological systems, says Northeastern professor William Detrich. With a new NSF grant, he will study how rising ocean temperatures will affect the development of the embryos of these fish and the growth of juveniles after hatching.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jessica Caragher
j.caragher@neu.edu
617-373-3287
Northeastern University

Public Release: 23-Jun-2015
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Old-school literature search helps ecologist identify puzzling parasite
A months-long literature search that involved tracking down century-old scientific papers and translating others from Czech and French helped University of Michigan ecologist Meghan Duffy answer a question she'd wondered about for years.
National Science Foundation, U-M's Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Showing releases 26-50 out of 822.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 ]

  Highlights
Science360 Science360 News Service
Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Science360 News is an up-to-date view of breaking science news from around the world. We gather news from wherever science is happening, including directly from scientists, college and university press offices, popular and peer-reviewed journals, dozens of National Science Foundation science and engineering centers, and funding sources that include government agencies, not-for-profit organizations and private industry.
Science360 Science for Everyone
The Science360 Video Library immerses visitors in the latest wonders of science, engineering, technology and math. Each video is embeddable for use on your website, blog or social media page.
NAGC Winner - Jellyfish NSF Exclusive Special Reports
From "Understanding the Brain" to "Engineering Agriculture's Future", these in-depth, Web-based reports explore the frontiers of science and engineering.