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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 847.

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Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Neuron
Reacting to personal setbacks: Do you bounce back or give up?
Sometimes when people get upsetting news -- such as a failing exam grade or a negative job review -- they decide instantly to do better the next time. In other situations that are equally disappointing, the same people may feel inclined to just give up. How can similar setbacks produce such different reactions? It may come down to how much control we feel we have over what happened, according to new research from Rutgers University-Newark. The study is published in the journal Neuron.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Rob Forman
robert.forman@rutgers.edu
973-972-7276
Rutgers University

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Superconductor Science and Technology
Titania-based material holds promise as new insulator for superconductors
Research from North Carolina State University shows that a type of modified titania, or titanium dioxide, holds promise as an electrical insulator for superconducting magnets, allowing heat to dissipate while preserving the electrical paths along which current flows.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Study resolves discrepancy in Greenland temperatures during end of last ice age
A new study of three ice cores from Greenland documents the warming of the large ice sheet at the end of the last ice age -- resolving a long-standing paradox over when that warming occurred.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Ed Brook
brooke@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8197
Oregon State University

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Neuron
How the brain finds what it's looking for
University of Chicago scientists have identified a brain region that appears central to perceiving the combination of color and motion. These neurons shift in sensitivity toward different colors and directions depending on what is being attended. The study sheds light on a key neurological process.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, McKnight Scholar award, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Brain Research Foundation, Fyssen Foundation

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Coffee genome sheds light on the evolution of caffeine
An international research team has sequenced the genome of the coffee plant Coffea canephora. By comparing genes in the coffee, tea and chocolate plants, the scientists show that enzymes involved in making caffeine likely evolved independently in these three organisms. More than 8.7 million tons of coffee was produced in 2013; it is the principal agricultural product of many tropical nations.
French National Research Agency, Australian Research Council, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, CNR-ENEA Agrifood Project of Italy, Funding Authority for Studies and Projects of Brazil, National Science Foundation

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Scientific Reports
Drexel team unveils Dreadnoughtus: A gigantic, exceptionally complete sauropod dinosaur
The new 65-ton (59,300 kg) dinosaur species Dreadnoughtus schrani is the largest land animal for which body mass can be accurately calculated. Its skeleton is the most complete ever found of its type, with over 70 percent of the bones, excluding the head, represented. Because all previously discovered supermassive dinosaurs are known from relatively fragmentary remains, Dreadnoughtus offers an unprecedented window into the anatomy and biomechanics of the largest animals to ever walk the Earth.
National Science Foundation, Jurassic Foundation

Contact: Rachel Ewing
215-298-4600
Drexel University

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Scientists apply biomedical technique to reveal changes within the body of the ocean
For decades, medical researchers have sought new methods to diagnose how different types of cells and systems in the body are functioning. Now scientists have adapted an emerging biomedical technique to study the vast body of the ocean.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Black History Bulletin
Students report greater learning gains in traditional science courses
Students taking traditional, in-class science courses reported higher perceived learning gains than students enrolled in online distance education science courses. Notably, African-American students taking traditional science courses self-reported greater affective and psychomotor learning gains than students taking online science courses.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lamont Flowers
lflower@clemson.edu
864-656-0315
Clemson University

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Tissue Engineering
A 'clear' choice for clearing 3-D cell cultures
Scientists have hailed recent demonstrations of chemical technologies for making animal tissues see-through, but a new study is the first to evaluate three such technologies side-by-side for use with engineered 3-D tissue cultures.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Brown Institute for Brain Science

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Nature
Study shows cellular RNA can template DNA repair in yeast
Scientists have shown that RNA produced within cells of a common budding yeast can serve as a template for repairing the most devastating DNA damage -- a break in both strands of a DNA helix.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Georgia Research Alliance

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Nature
Hawaii scientist maps, names Laniakea, our home supercluster of galaxies
An international team of astronomers has defined the contours of the immense supercluster of galaxies containing our own Milky Way. They have named the supercluster 'Laniakea,' meaning 'immense heaven' in Hawaiian.
National Science Foundation, Space Telescope Science Institute, Jet Propulsion Lab, NASA, Israel Science Foundation, Lyon Institute of Origins, Centre national de la recherche scientifique

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Grooving crystal surfaces repel water
Researchers in Japan developed a porous polymer that stores and sorts organic molecules in the presence of water, which could have big implications for various industrial processes such as energy storage.
Advanced Catalytic Transformation Program for Carbon Utilization, Japan Science and Technology Agency, ENEOS Hydrogen Trust Fund

Contact: Peter Gee
pr@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp
075-753-9755
Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Psychological Science
Experiences make you happier than possessions -- Before and after
To get the most enjoyment out of our dollar, science tells us to focus our discretionary spending on experiences such as travel over material goods. A new Cornell University study shows that the enjoyment we derive from experiential purchases may begin even before we buy.
National Science Foundation, John Templeton Foundation

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
New synthesis method may shape future of nanostructures, clean energy
A team of University of Maryland physicists has published new nanoscience advances that they and other scientists say make possible new nanostructures and nanotechnologies with huge potential applications ranging from clean energy and quantum computing advances to new sensor development.
Office of Naval Research, U.S. Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Research Corporation

Contact: Lee Tune
ltune@umd.edu
301-405-4679
University of Maryland

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
NSF renews grant for biological physics research at Rice
Rice University has received a five-year, $11.75 million grant from the National Science Foundation to support the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
CBE-Life Sciences Education
More than half of biology majors are women, yet gender gaps remain in science classrooms
STEM fields are heavily dominated by males, which is of concern to universities as they try to improve student retention and achievement. One exception is in the field of biology. Of undergraduate biology majors, more than 60 percent are female. A common assumption is the field of biology no longer faces gender inequalities. However, ASU and UofW researchers have proven otherwise. A large analysis of gender differences shows gender-based gaps in achievement and class participation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sandra Leander
sandra.leander@asu.edu
480-965-9865
Arizona State University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Researchers awarded $1.5 million to develop software to process solar astronomy data on larger scale
Researchers in Georgia State University's new Astroinformatics program have been awarded $1.5 million from the National Science Foundation to develop software tools that can process large sets of solar astronomy data and allow scientists to perform analyses on scales and detail levels that have not been possible.
National Science Foundation

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Surprising new role for calcium in sensing pain
When you accidentally touch a hot oven, you rapidly pull your hand away. Duke researchers have made a surprising discovery in worms about the role of calcium in such pain signaling. They have built a structural model of the molecule that allows calcium ions to pass into a neuron, triggering a signal of pain. These discoveries may help direct new strategies to treat pain in people.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Esther A. and Joseph Klingenstein Fund, Whitehall Foundation, Duke University

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Single laser stops molecular tumbling motion instantly
In the quantum world, making the simple atom behave is one thing, but making the more complex molecule behave is another story. Now Northwestern University scientists have figured out an elegant way to stop a molecule from tumbling so that its potential for new applications, such as quantum computing, can be harnessed: shine a single laser on a trapped molecule and it instantly cools to the temperature of outer space, stopping the rotation of the molecule.
US Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Researchers find Asian camel crickets now common in US homes
With their long, spiky legs and their propensity for eating anything, including each other, camel crickets are the stuff of nightmares. And now research from North Carolina State University finds that non-native camel cricket species have spread into homes across the eastern United States.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sierra Nevada freshwater runoff could drop 26 percent by 2100, UC study finds
Freshwater runoff from the Sierra Nevada may decrease by as much as one-quarter by 2100 due to climate warming on the high slopes, according to scientists at UC Irvine and UC Merced.
National Science Foundation, Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory, US Department of Energy

Contact: Laura Rico
lrico@uci.edu
949-824-9055
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Engineers develop new sensor to detect tiny individual nanoparticles
A team of researchers at Washington University in St. Louis, led by Lan Yang, Ph.D., the Das Family Career Development Associate Professor in Electrical & Systems Engineering, and their collaborators at Tsinghua University in China have developed a new sensor that can detect and count nanoparticles, at sizes as small as 10 nanometers, one at a time. The researchers say the sensor could potentially detect much smaller particles, viruses and small molecules.
National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office

Contact: Julie Flory
Julie.Flory@WUSTL.EDU
314-935-5408
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Technology
Accounting for biological aggregation in heating and imaging of magnetic nanoparticles
We systematically characterize the effects of aggregation on both radiofrequency heating and magnetic resonance image (MRI) contrast of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, including detailed analysis of the aggregate morphologies based on quasi-fractal descriptions. While aggregation is shown to produce significant reductions in both heating and MRI contrast, we also present a new method to quantify and correlate these effects for clinical applications, such as cancer hyperthermia, utilizing sweep imaging with Fourier transform MRI.
University of Minnesota, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
656-466-5775
World Scientific

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
New tuberculosis blood test in children is reliable and highly specific
A new blood test provides a fast and accurate tool to diagnose tuberculosis in children, a new proof-of-concept study shows. The newly developed test is the first reliable immunodiagnostic assay to detect active tuberculosis in children. The test features excellent specificity, a similar sensitivity as culture tests in combination with speed of a blood test. The promising findings are a major advance for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in children, particularly in tuberculosis-endemic regions.
European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Klaus Reither
Klaus.Reither@unibas.ch
41-612-848-967
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature
Mixing in star-forming clouds explains why sibling stars look alike
The chemical uniformity of stars in the same cluster is the result of turbulent mixing in the clouds of gas where star formation occurs, according to a study by astrophysicists at UC Santa Cruz. Their results show that even stars that don't stay together in a cluster will share a chemical fingerprint with their siblings which can be used to trace them to the same birthplace.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Showing releases 251-275 out of 847.

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