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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 251-275 out of 814.

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Public Release: 31-Jul-2014
Chemical Communications
Chemists demonstrate 'bricks-and-mortar' assembly of new molecular structures
Chemists at Indiana University Bloomington have described the self-assembly of large, symmetrical molecules in bricks-and-mortar fashion, a development with potential value for the field of organic electronic devices such as field-effect transistors and photovoltaic cells.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature
Antarctic ice sheet is result of CO2 decrease, not continental breakup
Climate modelers from the University of New Hampshire have shown that the most likely explanation for the initiation of Antarctic glaciation during a major climate shift 34 million years ago was decreased carbon dioxide levels. The finding counters a 40-year-old theory suggesting massive rearrangements of Earth's continents caused global cooling and the abrupt formation of the Antarctic ice sheet. It will provide scientists insight into the climate change implications of current rising global CO2 levels.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Sims
david.sims@unh.edu
603-862-5369
University of New Hampshire

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Animal Behaviour
Supportive moms and sisters boost female baboon's rank
A study of dominance in female baboons suggests that the route to a higher rank is to maintain close ties with mom, and to have lots of supportive sisters.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Chicago Zoological Society

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
NSF grant to Wayne State supports new concept for manufacturing nanoscale devices
According to the National Science Foundation, nanotechnology is the creation and utilization of functional materials, devices, and systems with novel properties and functions. A major bottleneck in scaling up nanotechnology is the lack of manufacturing methods that connect different functional materials into one device. A research team led by Dr. Guangzhao Mao, professor of chemical engineering and materials science at Wayne State University, is seeking answers to this problem.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Langmuir
Exploring 3-D printing to make organs for transplants
Printing whole new organs for transplants sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but the real-life budding technology could one day make actual kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs for patients who desperately need them. In the ACS journal Langmuir, scientists are reporting new understanding about the dynamics of 3-D bioprinting that takes them a step closer to realizing their goal of making working tissues and organs on-demand.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature
Mapping the optimal route between 2 quantum states
As a quantum state collapses from a quantum superposition to a classical state or a different superposition, it will follow a path known as a quantum trajectory. In a new paper featured this week on the cover of Nature, scientists have shown that it is possible to track these quantum trajectories and compare them to a recently developed theory for predicting the most likely path a system will take between two states.
Army Research Office, Office of Naval Research, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Barnstone
dbarnsto@ur.rochester.edu
585-276-6264
University of Rochester

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Spin-based electronics: New material successfully tested
Spintronics is a new field of electronics, using electron spin rather than motion. This technology requires insulating components that can control this quantum property. Scientists have shown experimentally that a novel material shows all the required properties.
Sino-Swiss Science and Technology Cooperation, Swiss National Science Foundation, MOST, Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
New catalyst converts carbon dioxide to fuel
Scientists from the University of Illinois at Chicago have synthesized a catalyst that improves their system for converting waste carbon dioxide into syngas, a precursor of gasoline and other energy-rich products, bringing the process closer to commercial viability.
American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund, National Science Foundation, University of Illinois at Chicago, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jeanne Galatzer-Levy
jgala@uic.edu
312-996-1583
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
ZooKeys
Decades-old amber collection offers new views of a lost world
Scientists are searching through a massive collection of 20-million-year-old amber found in the Dominican Republic more than 50 years ago, and the effort is yielding fresh insights into ancient tropical insects and the world they inhabited. (Includes a video about the work narrated by David Attenborough.)
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 30-Jul-2014
Nature
Finding quantum lines of desire
What paths do quantum particles, such as atoms or photons, follow through quantum state space? Kater Murch of Washington University in St. Louis has used an 'artificial atom' to continuously and repeatedly paths through quantum state space. From the cobweb of a million paths, a most likely path between two quantum states emerged, much as social trails emerge as people round off corners or cut across lawns between buildings.
US Army Research Office, Office of Naval Research, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Intelligence Advanced Research Projects, National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
UC San Diego's WIFIRE project helps firefighters get a jump on wildfires
In recent years, the number and scale of wildfires in the US has risen, threatening cities and forests, and at times forcing large-scale evacuations. Now, thanks to a multi-year, $2.65 million grant from the National Science Foundation, the University of California San Diego, and the University of Maryland have been building a cyberinfrastructure to better monitor, predict, and mitigate wildfires in the future.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jan Zverina
jzverina@sdsc.edu
858-534-5111
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
SIGGRAPH 2014
ACM Transactions on Graphics
Vision-correcting display makes reading glasses so yesterday
Researchers at UC Berkeley are developing vision-correcting displays that can compensate for a viewer's visual impairments to create sharp images without the need for glasses or contact lenses. The technology could potentially help those who currently need corrective lenses to use their smartphones, tablets and computers, and could one day aid people with more complex visual problems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-643-7741
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Tough foam from tiny sheets
Tough, ultralight foam of atom-thick sheets can be made to any size and shape through a chemical process invented at Rice University.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mike Williams
mikewilliams@rice.edu
713-348-6728
Rice University

Public Release: 29-Jul-2014
Early Childhood Research Quarterly
First grade reading suffers in segregated schools
A groundbreaking study from the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute has found that African-American students in first grade experience smaller gains in reading when they attend segregated schools -- but the students' backgrounds likely are not the cause of the differences.
National Science Foundation/AERA Grants Program

Contact: Kirsten Kainz
kirsten.kainz@unc.edu
919-843-4593
Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Generating a genome to feed the world: UA-led team sequences African rice
An international team of scientists led by the UA has sequenced the genome of African rice. The new information will enable scientists and agriculturalists to develop varieties of rice that can survive in a changing climate.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Rod Wing
rwing@mail.arizona.edu
520-345-2654
University of Arizona

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Forced mutations doom HIV
A new study from MIT researchers reveals how a potential HIV drug exacts its toll on viral populations.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laser Biomedical Research Center

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Mineral magic? Common mineral capable of making and breaking bonds
A team of researchers from Arizona State University have demonstrated how a common mineral acts as a catalysts for specific hydrothermal organic reactions -- negating the need for toxic solvents or expensive reagents.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Nikki Cassis
ncassis@asu.edu
602-710-7169
Arizona State University

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Nature Genetics
Stress-tolerant tomato relative sequenced
The genome of Solanum pennellii, a wild relative of the domestic tomato, has been published by an international group of researchers including labs at the UC Davis Department of Plant Biology. The new genome information may help breeders produce tastier, more stress-tolerant tomatoes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Langmuir
Seeing is bead-lieving
Rice scientists make models for polymer macromolecules using magnets and DNA 'springs' that can be tuned for flexibility.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Mike Williams
mikewilliams@rice.edu
713-348-6728
Rice University

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Ecological Complexity
Social network research may boost prairie dog conservation efforts
Researchers using statistical tools to map social connections in prairie dogs have uncovered relationships that escaped traditional observational techniques, shedding light on prairie dog communities that may help limit the spread of bubonic plague and guide future conservation efforts.
NESCent, NASA, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Superconductivity could form at high temperatures in layered 2-D crystals
An elusive state of matter called superconductivity could be realized in stacks of sheetlike crystals just a few atoms thick, new analysis determined. Electrons and 'holes' would accumulate in separate layers of a 2-D semiconductor compound in response to an electrical field forming a superfluid gas of indirect excitons. Counterflow superconductivity would result.
US Office of Naval Research, University of California, National Science Foundation, European Research Council, European Commission's Future and Emerging Technologies European Graphene Flagship

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Scientific Reports
Industrial lead pollution beat explorers to the South Pole by 22 years and persists today
Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen became the first man to reach the South Pole in December of 1911. More than 100 years later, an international team of scientists led by Joe McConnell of Nevada's Desert Research Institute have proven that air pollution from industrial activities arrived long before.
NSF/Division of Polar Programs

Contact: Justin Broglio
justin.broglio@dri.edu
775-762-8320
Desert Research Institute

Public Release: 28-Jul-2014
Biological Reviews
Dinosaurs fell victim to perfect storm of events, study shows
Dinosaurs might have survived the asteroid strike that wiped them out if it had taken place slightly earlier or later in history, scientists say.
National Science Foundation, European Commission

Contact: Catriona Kelly
Catriona.Kelly@ed.ac.uk
44-131-651-4401
University of Edinburgh

Public Release: 27-Jul-2014
Nature Climate Change
Study: Climate change and air pollution will combine to curb food supplies
Many studies have shown the potential for global climate change to cut food supplies. But these studies have, for the most part, ignored the interactions between increasing temperature and air pollution -- specifically ozone pollution, which is known to damage crops. A new study involving researchers at MIT shows that these interactions can be quite significant, suggesting that policymakers need to take both warming and air pollution into account in addressing food security.
National Science Foundation, National Park Service, Croucher Foundation

Contact: Kimberly Allen
allenkc@mit.edu
617-253-2702
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 25-Jul-2014
Environmental Research Letters
Climate change increases risk of crop slowdown in next 20 years
The world faces a small but substantially increased risk over the next two decades of a major slowdown in the growth of global corn and wheat yields because of climate change, according to National Center for Atmospheric Research and Stanford University research. Such a slowdown would occur as global demand for crops rapidly increases.
National Science Foundation, Department of Energy

Contact: David Hosansky, NCAR/UCAR Media Relations
hosansky@ucar.edu
303-497-8611
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Showing releases 251-275 out of 814.

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