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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 945.

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Public Release: 8-Jun-2016
IEEE International Conference on Communications
Researchers find the right balance to speed wireless downloads through use of duplexing
Researchers have come up with a means of boosting wireless efficiency without increasing interference by mixing full and half duplex radios in base stations. This tunable solution could also allow wireless providers to adjust the mix of cells based on the needs of a region. The research team, led by Shivendra Panwar of NYU Tandon, conducted the first known study to investigate the impact of mixed-cell base stations on spectral efficiency and outages.
National Science Foundation, Center for Advanced Technology in Telecommunications, New York University WIRELESS research center, Higher Education Authority, Science Foundation Ireland

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
646-997-3792
NYU Tandon School of Engineering

Public Release: 8-Jun-2016
Physics Letters B
At the LHC, charmed twins will soon be more common than singles
In the range of energies penetrated by the LHC accelerator, a new mechanism of the creation of particles is becoming more prominent, say scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Krakow. The comparison between theoretical predictions and test data leaves no doubt: the energy in collisions is now so great that some of the elementary particles, mesons containing charm quarks, are beginning to emerge in pairs as often as single ones - and even more often.
Polish National Science Centre, Transfer of Natural Sciences and Engineering Knowledge in Rzeszów, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation

Contact: Prof. Antoni Szczurek
antoni.szczurek@ifj.edu.pl
48-126-628-212
The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences

Public Release: 8-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
Tiny diamonds could enable huge advances in nanotechnology
University of Maryland researchers developed a new, quick and inexpensive method for constructing diamond-based hybrid nanoparticles in large quantities from the ground up, thereby circumventing many of the problems with current methods. The process begins with nanoscale diamonds containing a 'nitrogen vacancy' impurity that confers special optical and electromagnetic properties. By attaching metal particles or semiconducting'"quantum dots,' the researchers can create various hybrid nanoparticles, including nanoscale semiconductors and magnets with precisely tailored properties.
US Department of Energy, Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matthew Wright
mewright@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 8-Jun-2016
Journal of Archaeological Science
Old World metals traded on Alaska coast hundreds of years before contact with Europeans
Two leaded bronze artifacts found in northwestern Alaska are the first evidence that metal from Asia reached prehistoric North America prior to contact with Europeans, according to new Purdue University research.
National Science Foundation's Office of Polar Programs Arctic Social Sciences

Contact: Amy Patterson Neubert
apatterson@purdue.edu
765-494-9723
Purdue University

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
Coral reefs fall victim to overfishing, pollution, ocean warming
Coral reefs are declining worldwide because a combination of factors -- overfishing, nutrient pollution and pathogenic disease -- ultimately become deadly in the face of higher ocean temperatures, according to a multiyear study by researchers from Rice, Oregon State and other institutions.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
Biology Letters
Sexual transmission of Ebola likely to impact course of outbreaks
Sexual transmission of the Ebola virus could have a major impact on the dynamics of the disease, potentially reigniting an outbreak that has been contained by public health interventions, according to research by University of Georgia ecologists just published in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters. The potential for sexual transmission is high for three to four months after the virus has been cleared from the bloodstream, and possible for an average of seven months.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
schupska@uga.edu
706-542-6927
University of Georgia

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
Deep learning helps to map Mars and analyze its surface chemistry
Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Mount Holyoke College are teaming up to apply recent advances in machine learning, specifically biologically inspired deep learning methods, to analyze large amounts of scientific data from Mars. They are funded by a new four-year, $1.2 million National Science Foundation grant to computer scientist Sridhar Mahadevan, lead principal investigator at UMass Amherst's College of Information and Computer Sciences.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
Applied Ecology
Hiking, hunting has minor effects on mammals in protected eastern forests
Recreation impact on wildlife distribution is minor compared with factors such as undisturbed forest habitat and local housing density.
National Science Foundation, VWR Foundation, US Forest Service, North Caroina Museum of Natural Sciences, Smithsonian Institution

Contact: Roland Kays
rwkays@ncsu.edu
919-707-8250
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
Astrophysical Journal
Computer simulations shed light on the Milky Way's missing red giants
Simulations investigate the possibility that red giants at the center of our galaxy were dimmed after they were stripped of 10s of percent of their mass millions of years ago during repeated collisions with an accretion disk.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jason Maderer
maderer@gatech.edu
404-660-2926
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene
Dartmouth-led study finds removal of dams in New England can help reconnect river networks and increase watershed resilience
Dam removal in New England is important to river restoration and provides an opportunity to enhance the magnitude and rate of river re-connection, and improve watershed resilience in response to human impact on the environment, if a broader strategic removal approach is implemented throughout the region.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Amy D. Olson
amy.d.olson@dartmouth.edu
603-646-3274
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 7-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
Coral reefs fall victim to overfishing, pollution aggravated by ocean warming
Coral reefs are declining around the world because a combination of factors -- overfishing, nutrient pollution, and pathogenic disease -- ultimately become deadly in the face of higher ocean temperatures, researchers have concluded. The findings are based on one of the largest and longest studies done on this issue.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Rebecca Vega-Thurber
Rebecca.vega-thurber@oregonstate.edu
541-737-1851
Oregon State University

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
eLife
WSU researcher affirms 86-year-old hypothesis
A Washington State University biologist has found what he calls 'very strong support' for an 86-year-old hypothesis about how nutrients move through plants. His two-decade analysis of the phenomenon has resulted in a suite of techniques that can ultimately be used to fight plant diseases and make crops more efficient.
National Science Foundation, Harvard Bullard Fellowship, Carlsberg Foundation, USDA/National Institute of Food and Agriculture, US Department of Energy

Contact: Michael Knoblauch, WSU professor of biological sciences
knoblauch@wsu.edu
509-335-3052
Washington State University

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Journal of the American Chemical Society
A new approach to chemical synthesis
MIT chemists have devised a new way to synthesize communesins -- fungal compounds with anti-cancer potential.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Optica
New photonic sensor opens the door to high-speed biodetection
Researchers from the University of Illinois have developed a new technique for extremely high speed photonic sensing of the mechanical properties of freely flowing particles using an opto-mechano-fluidic resonator. This work presents a new approach to perform resonantly enhanced optical sensing of freely flowing particles through the action of long-range phonons that extend between solid and fluid phases of the sensor and sample.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Gaurav Bahl
bahl@illinois.edu
217-300-2194
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Applied Energy
Microgrids, not always economically efficient in regulated electricity markets
Installing a microgrid within a regulated electricity market will sometimes, but not always, provide an economic benefit to customers, investors and utilities involved, according to new research led by Chiara Lo Prete, assistant professor of energy economics, Penn State.
National Science Foundation, Harvard University Center for the Environment

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Journal of Experimental Biology
Marine invertebrate larvae actively respond to their surroundings
Using larvae of sea urchins as test examples, scientists from HKUST and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution found that these little creatures actively modify their swimming speeds in response to ambient flow conditions. They actively increase their swimming speed in increased turbulence and are passively reoriented through morphology-flow interactions, which compromise their ability to maintain directed swimming.
National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Contact: Sherry No
sherryno@ust.hk
852-235-86317
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Genetics
Inbred Neanderthals left humans a genetic burden
The Neanderthal genome included harmful mutations that made the hominids around 40 percent less reproductively fit than modern humans, according to estimates published in the latest issue of the journal GENETICS. Non-African humans inherited some of this genetic burden when they interbred with Neanderthals, though much of it has been lost over time. The results suggest that these harmful gene variants continue to reduce the fitness of some populations today. The study also has implications for management of endangered species.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Cristy Gelling
cgelling@thegsajournals.org
412-478-3537
Genetics Society of America

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
'Wasteful' galaxies launch heavy elements into surrounding halos and deep space
Galaxies 'waste' large amounts of heavy elements generated by star formation by ejecting them up to a million light years away into their surrounding halos and deep space, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder.
NASA, PRACE, National Science Foundation, Institute for Computational Cosmology, European Research Council, Belgian Science Policy Office

Contact: Benjamin Oppenheimer
benjamin.oppenheimer@colorado.edu
508-215-7762
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Health Affairs
Study of 81,000 adults examines mental illness, gun violence and suicide
People with serious mental illnesses who use guns to commit suicide are often legally eligible to purchase guns, despite having a past record of an involuntary mental health examination and brief hospitalization, according to a new Duke Health analysis.
National Science Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation program in Public Health Law Research, Brain and Behavior Research Foundation, Elizabeth K. Dollard Charitable Trust

Contact: Samiha Khanna
samiha.khanna@duke.edu
919-419-5069
Duke University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Study finds wide geographic differences in treatment of diabetes, hypertension, depression
An international study led by Columbia University researchers has found widespread differences in the treatment of patients with common chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and depression.
National Library of Medicine, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation, Smart Family Foundation

Contact: Karin Eskenazi
ket2116@columbia.edu
212-342-0508
Columbia University Medical Center

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Electric eels make leaping attacks
Vanderbilt biologist Kenneth Catania has accidentally discovered that can electric eels make leaping attacks that dramatically increase the strength of the electric shocks they deliver and, in so doing, has confirmed a 200-year-old observation by famous 19th century explorer and naturalist Alexander von Humboldt.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David F Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 6-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ice age bison fossils shed light on early human migrations in North America
Scientists using evidence from bison fossils have determined when an ice-free corridor opened up along the Rocky Mountains during the late Pleistocene. The corridor has been considered a potential route for human and animal migrations between the far north (Alaska and Yukon) and the rest of North America, but when and how it was used has long been uncertain.
US National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Canada Research Chairs program, Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-4352
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 3-Jun-2016
Physical Review Letters
Technique could help climate models sweat the small stuff
Research led by a Brown University physicist reveals a way to include small-scale dynamics into computer simulations of large-scale phenomena, which could make for better climate models and astrophysical simulations.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2016
Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Kent State & Cleveland Metroparks launch learning app
Educators, scientists, and technologists from the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Kent State University and Cleveland Metroparks have partnered to develop a new learning app that is now live and freely available on iTunes. The app, called ParkApps, features a number of different resources aimed at educating park visitors as they run, hike and bike through the parks. The project was funded by the National Science Foundation's Advancing Informal STEM Learning initiative.
National Science Foundation's Advancing Informal STEM Learning initiative

Contact: Rick Ferdig
rferdig@kent.edu
330-672-3317
Kent State University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2016
Animal Behaviour
Personality changes can affect fish body shape, locomotion
Fish that are bred to be bolder or more shy show corresponding changes to their body shape and locomotion, suggesting that personality changes affect other seemingly unrelated traits. The findings could be useful in animal breeding, pest management and studies of complex human behaviors.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Langerhans
langerhans@ncsu.edu
919-515-3514
North Carolina State University

Showing releases 276-300 out of 945.

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