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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 276-300 out of 834.

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Public Release: 7-Sep-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Ultra-thin, high-speed detector captures unprecedented range of light waves
Research at the University of Maryland could lead to light detectors that can see below the surface of bodies, walls, and other objects, with applications in emerging terahertz fields such as mobile communications, medical imaging, chemical sensing, night vision, and security.
US Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation, Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity

Contact: Kathryn Tracey
ketracey@umd.edu
443-340-2299
University of Maryland

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
Frontiers in Microbiology
Like weeds of the sea, 'brown tide' algae exploit nutrient-rich coastlines
A new study by researchers at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and Stony Brook University highlights up close the survival skills that have made Aureococcus anophagefferens the bane of fishermen, boaters and real-estate agents. Building on previous mapping of Aureococcus' genome, the study, published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology this summer,confirms that the genes previously hypothesized to help Aureococcus survive in murky nutrient-rich waters, switch on in conditions typical of estuaries degraded by human activity.
US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research, a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Kim Martineau
kmartine@ldeo.columbia.edu
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
American Journal of Botany
Thousands of nuclear loci via target enrichment and genome skimming
A new approach in next-generation sequencing, called Hyb-Seq, uses targeted sequence capture via hybridization-based enrichment and makes it possible to sequence hundreds of genes at one time. The new protocol is poised to become the standard for efficiently producing genome-scale data sets to advance our understanding of the evolutionary history of plants, and is available in the September 2014 issue of Applications in Plant Sciences.
US National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Parada
apps@botany.org
American Journal of Botany

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
Kent State researchers to develop mobile app for Cuyahoga Valley National Park
A $972,000 NSF grant to researchers at Kent State University will result in a mobile device app to help visitors to Cuyahoga Valley National Park learn about the park's history and ecology and become 'citizen scientists' by sharing their findings. The study will focus on informal science learning. The app, once developed, could be adapted for other national parks.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cindy Weiss
lweiss4@kent.edu
330-672-0731
Kent State University

Public Release: 5-Sep-2014
Scientific Reports
Banked blood grows stiffer with age, study finds
It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the body, says a new study from University of Illinois researchers. Using advanced optical techniques, the researchers measured the stiffness of the membrane surrounding red blood cells over time. They found that, even though the cells retain their shape and hemoglobin content, the membranes get stiffer, which steadily decreases the cells' functionality.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Magnetic nanocubes self-assemble into helical superstructures
Collaborating with nanochemists led by Rafal Klajn at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, who found that magnetite nanocubes can self-assemble into helical superstructures under certain conditions, UIC theoretical chemist Petr Kral and his students simulated the phenomenon and explained the conditions under which it can occur.
Israel Science Foundation, G.M.J. Schmidt-Minerva Center for Supramolecular Architectures, Minerva Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeanne Galatzer-Levy
jgala@uic.edu
312-996-1583
University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
ACS Nano
UCSB researchers develop ultra sensitive biosensor from molybdenite semiconductor
UC Santa Barbara researchers demonstrate atomically thin, ultrasensitive and scalable molybdenum disulfide field-effect transistor based biosensors and establish their potential for single-molecule detection
National Science Foundation, California NanoSystems Institute, Materials Research Laboratory

Contact: Sonia Fernandez
sonia.fernandez@ucsb.edu
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
Research shows declining levels of acidity in Sierra Nevada lakes
A team led by an environmental scientist at the University of California, Riverside has conducted research on lakes in the Sierra Nevada -- the most sensitive lakes in the US to acid rain, according to the Environmental Protection Agency -- and described human impacts on them during the 20th century. The conclusion is the overall news is good: Air quality regulation has benefited aquatic ecosystems in the Sierra Nevada; controlling air pollution is benefiting nature in California.
National Park Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, National Science Foundation, University of California, Geological Society of America

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Optica
Atomically thin material opens door for integrated nanophotonic circuits
Researchers at the University of Rochester describe a new combination of materials that could be a step towards building computer chips capable of transporting digital information at the speed of light.
Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship

Contact: David Barnstone
dbarnsto@ur.rochester.edu
585-276-6264
University of Rochester

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Neuron
Reacting to personal setbacks: Do you bounce back or give up?
Sometimes when people get upsetting news -- such as a failing exam grade or a negative job review -- they decide instantly to do better the next time. In other situations that are equally disappointing, the same people may feel inclined to just give up. How can similar setbacks produce such different reactions? It may come down to how much control we feel we have over what happened, according to new research from Rutgers University-Newark. The study is published in the journal Neuron.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Rob Forman
robert.forman@rutgers.edu
973-972-7276
Rutgers University

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Superconductor Science and Technology
Titania-based material holds promise as new insulator for superconductors
Research from North Carolina State University shows that a type of modified titania, or titanium dioxide, holds promise as an electrical insulator for superconducting magnets, allowing heat to dissipate while preserving the electrical paths along which current flows.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Study resolves discrepancy in Greenland temperatures during end of last ice age
A new study of three ice cores from Greenland documents the warming of the large ice sheet at the end of the last ice age -- resolving a long-standing paradox over when that warming occurred.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Ed Brook
brooke@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8197
Oregon State University

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Neuron
How the brain finds what it's looking for
University of Chicago scientists have identified a brain region that appears central to perceiving the combination of color and motion. These neurons shift in sensitivity toward different colors and directions depending on what is being attended. The study sheds light on a key neurological process.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, McKnight Scholar award, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Brain Research Foundation, Fyssen Foundation

Contact: John Easton
john.easton@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5225
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Coffee genome sheds light on the evolution of caffeine
An international research team has sequenced the genome of the coffee plant Coffea canephora. By comparing genes in the coffee, tea and chocolate plants, the scientists show that enzymes involved in making caffeine likely evolved independently in these three organisms. More than 8.7 million tons of coffee was produced in 2013; it is the principal agricultural product of many tropical nations.
French National Research Agency, Australian Research Council, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, CNR-ENEA Agrifood Project of Italy, Funding Authority for Studies and Projects of Brazil, National Science Foundation

Contact: Cory Nealon
cmnealon@buffalo.edu
716-645-4614
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Scientific Reports
Drexel team unveils Dreadnoughtus: A gigantic, exceptionally complete sauropod dinosaur
The new 65-ton (59,300 kg) dinosaur species Dreadnoughtus schrani is the largest land animal for which body mass can be accurately calculated. Its skeleton is the most complete ever found of its type, with over 70 percent of the bones, excluding the head, represented. Because all previously discovered supermassive dinosaurs are known from relatively fragmentary remains, Dreadnoughtus offers an unprecedented window into the anatomy and biomechanics of the largest animals to ever walk the Earth.
National Science Foundation, Jurassic Foundation

Contact: Rachel Ewing
215-298-4600
Drexel University

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Scientists apply biomedical technique to reveal changes within the body of the ocean
For decades, medical researchers have sought new methods to diagnose how different types of cells and systems in the body are functioning. Now scientists have adapted an emerging biomedical technique to study the vast body of the ocean.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Black History Bulletin
Students report greater learning gains in traditional science courses
Students taking traditional, in-class science courses reported higher perceived learning gains than students enrolled in online distance education science courses. Notably, African-American students taking traditional science courses self-reported greater affective and psychomotor learning gains than students taking online science courses.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lamont Flowers
lflower@clemson.edu
864-656-0315
Clemson University

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Tissue Engineering
A 'clear' choice for clearing 3-D cell cultures
Scientists have hailed recent demonstrations of chemical technologies for making animal tissues see-through, but a new study is the first to evaluate three such technologies side-by-side for use with engineered 3-D tissue cultures.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Brown Institute for Brain Science

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Nature
Study shows cellular RNA can template DNA repair in yeast
Scientists have shown that RNA produced within cells of a common budding yeast can serve as a template for repairing the most devastating DNA damage -- a break in both strands of a DNA helix.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Georgia Research Alliance

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Nature
Hawaii scientist maps, names Laniakea, our home supercluster of galaxies
An international team of astronomers has defined the contours of the immense supercluster of galaxies containing our own Milky Way. They have named the supercluster 'Laniakea,' meaning 'immense heaven' in Hawaiian.
National Science Foundation, Space Telescope Science Institute, Jet Propulsion Lab, NASA, Israel Science Foundation, Lyon Institute of Origins, Centre national de la recherche scientifique

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Grooving crystal surfaces repel water
Researchers in Japan developed a porous polymer that stores and sorts organic molecules in the presence of water, which could have big implications for various industrial processes such as energy storage.
Advanced Catalytic Transformation Program for Carbon Utilization, Japan Science and Technology Agency, ENEOS Hydrogen Trust Fund

Contact: Peter Gee
pr@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp
075-753-9755
Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Psychological Science
Experiences make you happier than possessions -- Before and after
To get the most enjoyment out of our dollar, science tells us to focus our discretionary spending on experiences such as travel over material goods. A new Cornell University study shows that the enjoyment we derive from experiential purchases may begin even before we buy.
National Science Foundation, John Templeton Foundation

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
New synthesis method may shape future of nanostructures, clean energy
A team of University of Maryland physicists has published new nanoscience advances that they and other scientists say make possible new nanostructures and nanotechnologies with huge potential applications ranging from clean energy and quantum computing advances to new sensor development.
Office of Naval Research, U.S. Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Research Corporation

Contact: Lee Tune
ltune@umd.edu
301-405-4679
University of Maryland

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
NSF renews grant for biological physics research at Rice
Rice University has received a five-year, $11.75 million grant from the National Science Foundation to support the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
CBE-Life Sciences Education
More than half of biology majors are women, yet gender gaps remain in science classrooms
STEM fields are heavily dominated by males, which is of concern to universities as they try to improve student retention and achievement. One exception is in the field of biology. Of undergraduate biology majors, more than 60 percent are female. A common assumption is the field of biology no longer faces gender inequalities. However, ASU and UofW researchers have proven otherwise. A large analysis of gender differences shows gender-based gaps in achievement and class participation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sandra Leander
sandra.leander@asu.edu
480-965-9865
Arizona State University

Showing releases 276-300 out of 834.

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