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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 301-325 out of 877.

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Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists discover carbonate rocks are unrecognized methane sink
Since the first undersea methane seep was discovered 30 years ago, scientists have meticulously analyzed and measured how microbes in the seafloor sediments consume the greenhouse gas methane. They have now found a type of rock known as authigenic carbonate also contains vast amounts of active microbes that take up methane. This demonstrates that the global methane process is still poorly understood.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andrew Thurber
athurber@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-4500
Oregon State University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
$2.3 million NSF grant will fund MU study of math learning outcomes
Education researchers at the University of Missouri will receive nearly $2.3 million from the National Science Foundation over the next four years to study elementary students' mathematics learning outcomes in relation to teacher expertise and classroom assignment.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jesslyn Chew
ChewJ@missouri.edu
573-882-8353
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
The Anatomical Record
Dinosaur breathing study shows that noses enhanced smelling and cooled brain
It's been millions of years since T. rex took its last breath, but a team led by Ohio University scientists is breathing life back into dinosaurs using high-powered computer simulations to model airflow through dinosaur snouts. The research has important implications for how dinosaurs used their noses to not only breathe but to enhance the sense of smell and cool their brains.
National Science Foundation, Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine

Contact: Andrea Gibson
gibsona@ohio.edu
740-597-2166
Ohio University

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
UCI engineers develop prototype of low-cost, disposable lung infection detector
Imagine a low-cost, disposable breath analysis device that a person with cystic fibrosis could use at home along with a smartphone to immediately detect a lung infection, much like the device police use to gauge a driver's blood alcohol level.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lori Brandt
lbrandt@uci.edu
949-824-8306
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Journal of Avian Biology
A canary for climate change
Researchers find that wing-propelled diving seabirds, as well as their extinct relatives, may have served as an indicator species for environmental changes and faunal shifts. The findings also elucidate how past extinctions have influenced the modern distribution and population size of existing species.
National Science Foundation, National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, University of Texas at Austin

Contact: Nicole Duncan
nicole.duncan@nescent.org
919-668-7993
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 14-Oct-2014
Biology Letters
What goes up must come down
Geckos employ an adhesive system that facilitates their climbing vertically, and even in inverted positions. But can geckos employ this system when moving downhill? Biologists at the University of California, Riverside have conducted lab experiments on geckos to find that when moving on steep downhill surfaces geckos reverse the position of their hind feet to potentially use the adhesive system as a brake and/or stabilizer, resulting in the digits of the hind feet facing backwards.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
UH to develop new wireless communications systems to serve remote and rural areas
Advanced communications technology could bring broadband wireless service to remote and rural areas in the Hawaiian Islands, under a new research grant funded by the National Science Foundation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists link ALS progression to increased protein instability
A new study by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and other institutions suggests a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, NIH/National Center for Research Resources, NIH/National Institute of Aging, National Science Foundation, TSRI/Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology, Buck Institute for Research on Aging

Contact: Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Nature Physics
Researchers say academia can learn from Hollywood
According to a pair of University of Houston professors and their colleague from the IMT Lucca Institute for Advanced Studies in Italy, while science is increasingly moving in the direction of teamwork and interdisciplinary research, changes need to be made in academia to allow for a more collaborative model to flourish. Their findings are published in the October issue of Nature Physics.
National Science Foundation, Italian National Research Council

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Advanced Functional Materials
Tailored flexible illusion coatings hide objects from detection
Developing the cloak of invisibility would be wonderful, but sometimes simply making an object appear to be something else will do the trick, according to Penn State electrical engineers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 13-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Stanford scientists create a 'smart' lithium-ion battery that warns of fire hazard
Stanford University scientists have developed a 'smart' lithium-ion battery that gives ample warning before it overheats and bursts into flames. The new technology is designed for conventional lithium-ion batteries now used in billions of cellphones, laptops and other electronic devices, as well as a growing number of cars and airplanes.
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University

Public Release: 12-Oct-2014
Nature Materials
A novel platform for future spintronic technologies
Spintronics is a new field of electronics, using electron spin rather than charge. EPFL scientists, working with the Université Paris-Sud and Paul Scherrer Institut have shown that a conventional electrical insulator can be used as an optimal spintronic device.
French National Research Agency , RTRA–Triangle de la Physique, Swiss National Science Foundation, Institut Universitaire de France

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 10-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
Charged graphene gives DNA a stage to perform molecular gymnastics
When Illinois researchers investigated a method to control how DNA moves through a tiny sequencing device, they did not know they were about to witness a display of molecular gymnastics. The researchers found that a positive charge applied to a graphene nanopore speeds up DNA movement, while a negative charge stops the DNA in its tracks. However, the DNA seemed to dance across the graphene surface, pirouetting into sequence-specific shapes they had never seen.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 10-Oct-2014
Nature Communications
No single explanation for biodiversity in Madagascar
No single 'one-size-fits-all' model can explain how biodiversity hotspots come to be, finds a study of more than 700 species of reptiles and amphibians in Madagascar. By analyzing the distribution of Madagascar's lizards, snakes, frogs and tortoises, researchers find that each group responded differently to environmental fluctuations on the island over time. The results are important because they suggest that climate change and deforestation in Madagascar will have varying effects on different species.
Duke University, Volkswagen Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 10-Oct-2014
Applied Physics Letters
Getting sharp images from dull detectors
Like the 2014 chemistry Nobel Prize winning topic, this new JQI result centers around sub-wavelength detection.
National Institute of Standards and Technology, National Science Foundation

Contact: Phillip F. Schewe
pschewe@umd.edu
301-405-0989
Joint Quantum Institute

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
NSF awards $300,000 to MU to research open online communities
Open online communities, such as Wikipedia or free and open source software development projects, have emerged as significant drivers of innovation, economic activity and social well-being. The National Science Foundation has awarded $300,000 to the University of Missouri Informatics Institute in the College of Engineering to develop principles, systems and detailed methodological approaches for sharing OOC data and explaining OOC research results across disciplines.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Sossamon
sossamonj@missouri.edu
573-882-3346
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Macromolecules
Electrically conductive plastics promising for batteries, solar cells
An emerging class of electrically conductive plastics called 'radical polymers' may bring low-cost, transparent solar cells, flexible and lightweight batteries and ultra-thin antistatic coatings for consumer electronics and aircraft.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Neuron
Manipulating memory with light
UC Davis neuroscientists have used light to erase a specific memory in mice, showing how the hippocampus and cortex work together to retrieve memories.
Whitehall Foundation, McKnight Foundation, Nakajima Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Migrating animals' pee affects ocean chemistry
Tiny animals migrating from the ocean's surface to the sunless depths release ammonia, the equivalent of our urine, that plays a significant role in marine chemistry, particularly in low-oxygen zones.
Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Canadian Foundation for Innovation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Nature
Unstoppable magnetoresistance
Researchers at Princeton University have discovered a material (WTe2) with an extremely large magnetoresistance, which is the change in resistance as a material is exposed to stronger magnetic fields. The researchers exposed WTe2 to a 60-tesla magnetic field, close to the strongest magnetic field mankind can create, and observed a magnetoresistance of 13 million percent. The material's magnetoresistance displayed unlimited growth, making it the only known material without a saturation point.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Tien Nguyen
tienn@princeton.edu
609-258-6523
Princeton University

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Science
Snakes and snake-like robots show how sidewinders conquer sandy slopes
The amazing ability of sidewinder snakes to quickly climb sandy slopes was once something biologists only vaguely understood and roboticists only dreamed of replicating. By studying the snakes in a unique bed of inclined sand and using a snake-like robot to test ideas spawned by observing the real animals, both biologists and roboticists have now gained long-sought insights.
National Science Foundation, Army Research Office, Army Research Laboratory

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Plant Physiology
Automated imaging system looks underground to help improve crops
Researchers have developed an automated imaging technique for measuring and analyzing the root systems of mature plants. The work could help plant scientists improve food crops to help meet the needs of a growing world population.
National Science Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Country's economy plays role in Internet file-sharing patterns
Peer-to-peer file sharing over the Internet is a popular alternative approach for people worldwide to get the digital content they want. But little is known about these users and systems because data is lacking. Now, in an unprecedented study of BitTorrent users, a Northwestern University research team has discovered two behavior patterns: most users are content specialists -- sharing music but not movies, for example; and users in countries with similar economies tend to download similar types of content.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Cell Host & Microbe
New weapons against multidrug resistance in tuberculosis
Using a high-throughput screening assay, EPFL scientists have discovered two small molecules that could overcome the multidrug resistance of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis.
Vichem, Swiss National Science Foundation, German Federal Ministry of Research and Education, European Commission Marie Curie Fellowship

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 8-Oct-2014
Nature
Radio telescopes unravel mystery of nova gamma rays
Highly-detailed radio-telescope images have pinpointed the locations where a stellar explosion called a nova emitted gamma rays. The discovery revealed a probable mechanism for the gamma-ray emissions, which mystified astronomers when first observed in 2012.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dave Finley
dfinley@nrao.edu
575-835-7302
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Showing releases 301-325 out of 877.

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