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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 301-325 out of 904.

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Public Release: 2-Mar-2016
Journal of Experimental Biology
Water-skiing beetles get a bumpy ride
When a waterlily beetle (Galerucella nymphaeae) vanishes from the surface of a pond, it hasn't just disappeared; it's gone water-skiing at high speed -- 0.5m/s, equivalent to a human traveling at around 500km/h. Flying along the surface on four legs, the beetles also generate ripples as they bounce along the top of the water.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Science Foundation, Pew Foundation

Contact: Kathryn Knight
kathryn.knight@biologists.com
44-012-236-32871
The Company of Biologists

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Extinct otter-like 'marine bear' might have had a bite like a saber-toothed cat
New research suggests that the feeding strategy of Kolponomos, an enigmatic shell-crushing marine predator that lived about 20 million years ago, was strangely similar to a very different kind of carnivore: the saber-toothed cat Smilodon. Scientists have shown that even though the two extinct predators likely contrasted greatly in food preference and environment, they shared similar engineering in jaw structure.
National Science Foundation, American Museum of Natural History's Frick Postdoctoral Fellowships

Contact: Kendra Snyder
ksnyder@amnh.org
212-496-3419
American Museum of Natural History

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
NSF grant to help researcher with manufacture of ultra-thin precision parts
Kansas State University's Shuting Lei has received a National Science Foundation Manufacturing Machines and Equipment grant for his work on machining precision parts.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Source: Shuting Lei
lei@k-state.edu
785-532-3731
Kansas State University

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Journal of Economic Entomology
New method to stop Argentine ants
University of California, Riverside researchers may have found a better, more environmentally friendly way to stop the procession of Argentine ants, which have been spreading across the United States for the past few decades, despite pest control efforts.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Journal of Anatomy
Penguin brains not changed by loss of flight
Losing the ability to fly gave ancient penguins their unique locomotion style. But leaving the sky behind didn't cause major changes in their brain structure, researchers from The University of Texas at Austin suggest after examining the skull of the oldest known penguin fossil.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anton Caputo
anton.caputo@jsg.utexas.edu
512-232-9623
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Financial Cryptography and Data Security Conference
Renter beware: Study finds Craigslist catches barely half of scam rental listings
A new study of listings in 20 metropolitan areas finds that Craigslist fails to identify more than half of scam rental listings on the site's pages and that suspicious postings often linger for as long as 20 hours before being removed -- more than enough time to snare victims, especially in competitive housing markets. An automated conversation engine combed through 2 million ads and identified 29,000 fraudulent ones.
National Science Foundation, National Security Agency, Packard Fellowships for Science and Engineering, Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, Google, VMWare Research Award Program

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
646-997-3792
NYU Tandon School of Engineering

Public Release: 1-Mar-2016
Breast Cancer Research
Engineered hydrogel scaffolds enable growth of functioning human breast tissue
Whitehead Institute researchers have created a hydrogel scaffold that replicates the environment found within the human breast. The scaffold supports the growth of human mammary tissue from patient-derived cells and can be used to study normal breast development as well as breast cancer initiation and progression.
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships Program

Contact: Nicole Giese Rura
rura@wi.mit.edu
617-258-6851
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Public Release: 29-Feb-2016
ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing
Doctor, patient expectations differ on fitness and lifestyle tracking
With apps and activity trackers measuring every step people take, morsel they eat, and each symptom or pain, patients commonly arrive at doctor's offices armed with self-tracked data. Yet health-care providers lack the capacity or tools to review five years of Fitbit logs or instantaneously interpret the deluge of data patients have been collecting about themselves, according to new University of Washington research.
US Department of Health & Human Services' Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Intel Corp., National Science Foundation

Contact: Jennifer Langston
jlangst@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 29-Feb-2016
Nature Microbiology
Microorganisms duke it out within algal blooms
A five-month survey finds that algal blooms encompass dozens of types of microorganisms fighting for supremacy, with the dominant species shifting on an almost daily basis.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Marine Microbiology Initiative

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 29-Feb-2016
Molecular Systems Biology
Engineered swarmbots rely on peers for survival
Researchers from Duke University have engineered microbes that can't run away from home. Any refugees that do quickly die without protective proteins produced by their peers. Dubbed 'swarmbots' for their ability to survive in a crowd, the system could be used as a safeguard to stop genetically modified organisms from escaping into the surrounding environment. It could also reliably program colonies of bacteria to respond to changes in their surrounding environment.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Army Research Office

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Public Release: 29-Feb-2016
Psychological Science
Quick thinking and feeling healthy predict longer life
Suffering from chronic medical conditions and engaging in unhealthy behaviors are known risk factors for early death, but findings from a longitudinal study of over 6,000 adults suggests that certain psychological factors may be even stronger predictors of how long we'll live.
Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 29-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New understanding of bones could lead to stronger materials, osteoporosis treatment
Researchers at Cornell University have discovered that bone does something better than most man-made materials: it bounces back after it breaks. Cornell scientists report that cancellous bone displays unique material properties that allow it to recover shape after it breaks.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Daryl Lovell
Dal296@cornell.edu
607-254-4799
Cornell University

Public Release: 29-Feb-2016
PLOS Genetics
Watching new species evolve in real time
Sometimes evolution proceeds much more rapidly than we might think. Genetic analysis makes it possible to detect the earliest stages of species formation. For example, a study just published in PLOS Genetics by researchers from Eawag and the University of Bern, investigating rapid speciation in threespine stickleback in and around Lake Constance, shows that a species can begin to diverge very rapidly, even when the two daughter species breed alongside one another simultaneously.
Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Amy Yau
ayau@plos.org
44-122-344-2823
PLOS

Public Release: 28-Feb-2016
Network and Distributed System Security Symposium
Device 'fingerprints' could help protect power grid, other industrial systems
Researchers are using the unique electronic 'voices' produced by devices on the electrical grid to determine which signals are legitimate and which signals might be from attackers. These fingerprints could also be used to protect networked industrial control systems in oil and gas refineries, manufacturing facilities, wastewater treatment plants and other critical industrial systems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 26-Feb-2016
Organic Electronics
Solar cells as light as a soap bubble
Ultrathin, flexible photovoltaic cells from MIT research could find many new uses.
Eni-MIT Solar Frontiers Center, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Science
Synchronized leaf aging in the Amazon responsible for seasonal increases in photosynthesis
High-tech photography in the Amazon reveals that young leaves grow in at the same times as older ones perish, in strong contrast to temperate forests in North America or Europe, resulting in seasonal increases in photosynthesis that must be taken into account to build more accurate climate models.
National Science Foundation, NASA Terra-Aqua Science, GoAmazon Project, US Department of Energy, Brazilian State Science Foundations/Sao Paolo & Amazônas

Contact: Chelsea Whyte
cwhyte@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
A good night's sleep: Engineers develop technology for special needs children
A Kansas State University engineering team is using a National Science Foundation grant to help special needs children through technology that connects sleep data with daytime learning.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jennifer Tidball
jtidball@k-state.edu
785-532-0847
Kansas State University

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Psychological Science
Mastering the art of ignoring makes people more efficient
People searching for something can find it faster if they know what to look for. But new research suggests knowing what not to look for can be just as helpful.
Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation, Johns Hopkins University Science of Learning Institute

Contact: Jill Rosen
jrosen@jhu.edu
443-997-9906
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
New trigger for self-powered mechanical movement
A new way to use the chemical reactions of certain enzymes to trigger self-powered mechanical movement has been developed by a team of researchers at Penn State University and the University of Pittsburgh. The pumps provide precise control over flow rate without the aid of an external power source and are capable of turning on in response to specific chemicals.
Charles E. Kauffman Foundation, National Science Foundation, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
JCI Insight
Leaky lymphatics lead to obesity in mice
In the current issue of JCI Insight, Oliver and colleagues report definitive evidence linking obesity to lymphatic dysfunction in the Prox1+/- mouse model.
National Institutes of Health, Leducq Foundation Transatlantic Networks of Excellence, American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities, Swiss National Science Foundation, European Research Council

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
JCI Insight
Heart failure is associated with increased acetylation of metabolic proteins
In this month's issue of JCI Insight, Daniel Kelly of the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and his coauthors sought to explore how post-translational modification of mitochondrial proteins involved in energy metabolism contributes to the development of heart failure.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, American Chemical Society Division of Analytical Chemistry, Society of Analytical Chemists of Pittsburgh

Contact: Corinne Williams
press_releases@the-jci.org
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Louisiana Tech University professor awarded NSF CAREER grant
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Dr. Marisa Orr, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Louisiana Tech University, a five-year, $500,000 Early Career Development (CAREER) grant to support her research in engineering education and effective student decision-making.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dave Guerin
dguerin@latech.edu
318-257-4854
Louisiana Tech University

Public Release: 25-Feb-2016
Nature Materials
Quantum dot solids: This generation's silicon wafer?
Just as the single-crystal silicon wafer forever changed the nature of communication 60 years ago, a group of Cornell researchers is hoping its work with quantum dot solids -- crystals made out of crystals -- can help usher in a new era in electronics.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Daryl Lovell
dal296@cornell.edu
607-592-3925
Cornell University

Public Release: 24-Feb-2016
Nature Climate Change
Global warming will drive vast, unpredictable shift in natural wealth
Many studies have shown that critical natural resources, including fish stocks, are moving poleward as the planet warms. A new Yale-led study suggests that these biophysical changes are also reallocating global wealth in unpredictable, and potentially destabilizing, ways.
National Science Foundation, New Jersey Sea Grant, Knobloch Family Foundation, Nordforsk

Contact: Kevin Dennehy
203-436-4842
Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

Public Release: 24-Feb-2016
Behavioral Ecology
Bluebird's conundrum: Shack up now or hang out in mom's nest for a while?
Young male bluebirds may gain an evolutionary advantage by delaying breeding and helping out their parents' nests instead, according to new research led by Caitlin Stern of the Santa Fe Institute.
Omidyar Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Santa Fe Institute, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, National Science Foundation

Contact: John German
jdg@santafe.edu
Santa Fe Institute

Showing releases 301-325 out of 904.

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