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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 301-325 out of 824.

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Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Alaska frogs reach record lows in extreme temperature survival
'Alaska wood frogs spend more time freezing and thawing outside than a steak does in your freezer and the frog comes back to life in the spring in better shape than the steak,' said Don Larson, University of Alaska Fairbanks graduate student and lead author on a recent paper demonstrating that freeze tolerance in Alaska wood frogs is more extreme than previously thought.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Marie Thoms
methoms@alaska.edu
907-474-7412
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
The dopamine transporter
Michelle Sahai of the Weill Cornell Medical College uses the XSEDE-allocated Stampede supercomputer to study the dopamine transporter. Stampede is ranked seventh on the Top 500 list of supercomputers. Her research links altered dopamine signaling and dopamine transporter function to neurological and psychiatric diseases including early-onset Parkinsonism, ADHD, and cocaine addiction.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Faith Singer-Villalobos
faith@tacc.utexas.edu
512-232-5771
University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
UT Arlington big data team wins $600,000 NSF grant to build gene expression database
Heng Huang, an associate professor of computer and science engineering at UT Arlington, and professor Chris Ding, also of the UT Arlington Computer Science and Engineering department, will develop an interactive database of gene expressions of the fruit fly.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Traci Peterson
tpeterso@uta.edu
817-521-5494
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Scientists to investigate effects of climate change on Chesapeake Bay
A Virginia Tech researcher will examine the effects of climate change on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. A multi-university team will answer the ongoing questions of how the impacts of man-made stressors such as agricultural use and burgeoning populations work in concert with a warming planet on water systems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Zeke Barlow
bzeke@vt.edue
540-231-5417
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Search for more accurate system reliability and failure prediction in auto industry
A team of researchers from Wayne State University recently received a $350,000 award from the National Science Foundation for the project, 'Failure Prediction and Reliability Analysis of Ultra-High Strength Steel Autobody Manufacturing Systems by Utilizing Material Microstructure Properties.' The research is the first attempt to incorporate material microstructure and micro-damage information into a reliability study that fundamentally improves the accuracy of failure and reliability prediction.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Biology Letters
New model helps explain how provisions promote or reduce wildlife disease
Scientists have long known that providing supplemental food for wildlife, or resource provisioning, can sometimes cause more harm than good. University of Georgia ecologists have developed a new mathematical model to tease apart the processes that help explain why. Their research, which has implications for public health and wildlife conservation, appears in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters.
University Of Georgia, National Science Foundation

Contact: Daniel Becker
dbecker@uga.edu
706-542-3485
University of Georgia

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Technique simplifies the creation of high-tech crystals
Researchers propose a method to create precision crystals by adding polymer to a chemical mixture.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Sullivan
js29@princeton.edu
609-258-4597
Princeton University, Engineering School

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Psychological Science
Preschoolers can reflect on what they don't know
Contrary to previous assumptions, researchers find that preschoolers are able to gauge the strength of their memories and make decisions based on their self-assessments. The study findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Journal of Applied Physics
Law of physics governs airplane evolution
Scientists have found that a law of physics predicts the evolution of commercial airliners and also provides guidelines for future designs.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Public Release: 22-Jul-2014
Optica
Creating optical cables out of thin air
Imagine being able to instantaneously run an optical cable or fiber to any point on earth, or even into space. In a paper published in the July 2014 issue of the journal Optica, researchers report using an 'air waveguide' to enhance light signals collected from distant sources. These air waveguides could have many applications, including long-range laser communications, detecting pollution in the atmosphere, making high-resolution topographic maps and laser weapons.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Robinson
abbyr@umd.edu
301-405-5845
University of Maryland

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nano Letters
Penn study: Understanding graphene's electrical properties on an atomic level
For the first time, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have used a cutting-edge microscope to study the relationship between the atomic geometry of a ribbon of graphene and its electrical properties.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy, Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique, South Korea's Ministry of Education, Science and Technology and National Research Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Inorganic Chemistry
Oregon chemists eye improved thin films with metal substitution
The yield so far is small, but chemists at the University of Oregon have developed a low-energy, solution-based mineral substitution process to make a precursor to transparent thin films that could find use in electronics and alternative energy devices.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Syracuse University chemist to use NSF grant to study materials chemistry, nanoscience
Mathew M. Maye, associate professor of chemistry, has been awarded a three-year, $360,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. The award supports his ongoing work with metal stainless alloy nanostructures, the results of which may impact gas storage, heterogeneous catalysis, and rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. 

National Science Foundation

Contact: Rob Enslin
315-443-3403
Syracuse University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Stem cells aid muscle repair and strengthening after resistance exercise
By injecting mesenchymal stem cells into mouse leg muscles prior to several bouts of eccentric exercise (similar to the lengthening contractions performed during resistance training in humans), researchers were able to increase the rate of repair and enhance the growth and strength of those muscles in the exercising mice.
Ellison Medical Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Studying estrogens made by the brain may offer new insights in learning and memory
New studies being launched by neurobiologist Luke Remage-Healey at the University of Massachusetts Amherst will investigate how estrogens produced in the brains of young birds enhance their ability to learn songs during a critical window during development. This period has a parallel to universal language development in human children.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Philosopher uses game theory to understand how words, actions acquire meaning
The latest work from a Kansas State University philosopher appears in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, which is a rarity for philosophy research.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Elliott Wagner
eowagner@k-state.edu
785-532-0420
Kansas State University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Try, try again? Study says no
MIT neuroscientists find that trying harder makes it more difficult to learn some aspects of language.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
More than glitter
A new study from MIT materials scientists reveals that these nanoparticles enter cells by taking advantage of a route normally used in vesicle-vesicle fusion, a crucial process that allows signal transmission between neurons. In the July 21 issue of Nature Communications, the researchers describe in detail the mechanism by which these nanoparticles are able to fuse with a membrane.
National Science Foundation, Swiss National Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bacteria swim with whole body, not just propellers
Many bacteria swim using flagella, corkscrew-like appendages that push or pull bacterial cells like tiny propellers. It's long been assumed that the flagella do all the work during swimming, while the rest of the cell body is just along for the ride. But new research from Brown University shows that a helical movement of the cell body generates thrust and helps the organism to swim.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature
Size and age of plants impact their productivity more than climate, study shows
The size and age of plants has more of an impact on their productivity than temperature and precipitation, according to a landmark study by University of Arizona professor Brian Enquist and postdoctoral researcher Sean Michaletz. They show that variation in terrestrial ecosystems is characterized by a common mathematical relationship but that climate plays a relatively minor direct role. The results have important implications for models used to predict climate change effects on ecosystem function and worldwide food production.
National Science Foundation, Aspen Center for Environmental Studies, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Fujian Natural Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars

Contact: Shelley Littin
littin@email.arizona.edu
319-541-1482
University of Arizona

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Climate Change
CU, Old Dominion team finds sea level rise in western tropical Pacific anthropogenic
A new study led by Old Dominion University and the University of Colorado Boulder indicates sea levels likely will continue to rise in the tropical Pacific Ocean off the coasts of the Philippines and northeastern Australia as humans continue to alter the climate.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Leben
robert.leben@colorado.edu
303-492-4113
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Ecology Letters
Fecal transplants let packrats eat poison
Woodrats lost their ability to eat toxic creosote bushes after antibiotics killed their gut microbes. Woodrats that never ate the plants were able to do so after receiving fecal transplants with microbes from creosote-eaters, University of Utah biologists found.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Physical Review Letters
Highly charged ions
Why can't neodymium be more like tin? Well it can, if you ionize it enough. Why strip atoms of a dozen or more electrons? To make them more amenable for use in atomic clocks and quantum computers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Phillip F. Schewe
pschewe@umd.edu
301-405-0989
Joint Quantum Institute

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
It's go time for LUX-Zeplin dark matter experiment
From the physics labs at Yale University to the bottom of a played-out gold mine in South Dakota, a new generation of dark matter experiments is ready to commence. The US Department of Energy's Office of Science and the National Science Foundation recently gave the go-ahead to Large Underground Xenon-Zeplin, a key experiment in the hunt for dark matter, the invisible substance that may make up much of the universe.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Shelton
james.shelton@yale.edu
203-361-8332
Yale University

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
The bend in the Appalachian mountain chain is finally explained
The 1500 mile Appalachian mountain chain runs along a nearly straight line from Alabama to Newfoundland -- except for a curious bend in Pennsylvania and New York State. Researchers from the College of New Jersey and the University of Rochester now know what caused that bend -- a dense, underground block of rigid, volcanic rock forced the chain to shift eastward as it was forming millions of years ago.
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation

Contact: Leonor Sierra
lsierra@ur.rochester.edu
585-276-6264
University of Rochester

Showing releases 301-325 out of 824.

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