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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 326-350 out of 815.

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Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Philosopher uses game theory to understand how words, actions acquire meaning
The latest work from a Kansas State University philosopher appears in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, which is a rarity for philosophy research.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Elliott Wagner
eowagner@k-state.edu
785-532-0420
Kansas State University

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
PLOS ONE
Try, try again? Study says no
MIT neuroscientists find that trying harder makes it more difficult to learn some aspects of language.
NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
More than glitter
A new study from MIT materials scientists reveals that these nanoparticles enter cells by taking advantage of a route normally used in vesicle-vesicle fusion, a crucial process that allows signal transmission between neurons. In the July 21 issue of Nature Communications, the researchers describe in detail the mechanism by which these nanoparticles are able to fuse with a membrane.
National Science Foundation, Swiss National Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Bacteria swim with whole body, not just propellers
Many bacteria swim using flagella, corkscrew-like appendages that push or pull bacterial cells like tiny propellers. It's long been assumed that the flagella do all the work during swimming, while the rest of the cell body is just along for the ride. But new research from Brown University shows that a helical movement of the cell body generates thrust and helps the organism to swim.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature
Size and age of plants impact their productivity more than climate, study shows
The size and age of plants has more of an impact on their productivity than temperature and precipitation, according to a landmark study by University of Arizona professor Brian Enquist and postdoctoral researcher Sean Michaletz. They show that variation in terrestrial ecosystems is characterized by a common mathematical relationship but that climate plays a relatively minor direct role. The results have important implications for models used to predict climate change effects on ecosystem function and worldwide food production.
National Science Foundation, Aspen Center for Environmental Studies, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Fujian Natural Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars

Contact: Shelley Littin
littin@email.arizona.edu
319-541-1482
University of Arizona

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Nature Climate Change
CU, Old Dominion team finds sea level rise in western tropical Pacific anthropogenic
A new study led by Old Dominion University and the University of Colorado Boulder indicates sea levels likely will continue to rise in the tropical Pacific Ocean off the coasts of the Philippines and northeastern Australia as humans continue to alter the climate.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Leben
robert.leben@colorado.edu
303-492-4113
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 20-Jul-2014
Ecology Letters
Fecal transplants let packrats eat poison
Woodrats lost their ability to eat toxic creosote bushes after antibiotics killed their gut microbes. Woodrats that never ate the plants were able to do so after receiving fecal transplants with microbes from creosote-eaters, University of Utah biologists found.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Physical Review Letters
Highly charged ions
Why can't neodymium be more like tin? Well it can, if you ionize it enough. Why strip atoms of a dozen or more electrons? To make them more amenable for use in atomic clocks and quantum computers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Phillip F. Schewe
pschewe@umd.edu
301-405-0989
Joint Quantum Institute

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
It's go time for LUX-Zeplin dark matter experiment
From the physics labs at Yale University to the bottom of a played-out gold mine in South Dakota, a new generation of dark matter experiments is ready to commence. The US Department of Energy's Office of Science and the National Science Foundation recently gave the go-ahead to Large Underground Xenon-Zeplin, a key experiment in the hunt for dark matter, the invisible substance that may make up much of the universe.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Shelton
james.shelton@yale.edu
203-361-8332
Yale University

Public Release: 18-Jul-2014
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
The bend in the Appalachian mountain chain is finally explained
The 1500 mile Appalachian mountain chain runs along a nearly straight line from Alabama to Newfoundland -- except for a curious bend in Pennsylvania and New York State. Researchers from the College of New Jersey and the University of Rochester now know what caused that bend -- a dense, underground block of rigid, volcanic rock forced the chain to shift eastward as it was forming millions of years ago.
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation

Contact: Leonor Sierra
lsierra@ur.rochester.edu
585-276-6264
University of Rochester

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Nature
Tiniest catch: University of Arizona scientists' fishing expedition reveals viral diversity in the sea
Using bacteria as bait, University of Arizona scientists caught wild ocean viruses and then deciphered their genomes. They learned that the genetic lines between virus types in nature are less blurred than previously thought.
Department of Energy, University of Arizona/Biosphere 2, University of Arizona/BIO5 Institute, National Science Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Daniel Stolte
stolte@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4402
University of Arizona

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Physical Review Letters
First ab initio method for characterizing hot carriers
Berkeley Lab researchers have developed the first ab initio method for characterizing the properties of 'hot carriers' in semiconductors. This should help clear a major road block to the development of new, more efficient solar cells.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
Carnegie Mellon combines hundreds of videos to reconstruct 3D motion without markers
Carnegie Mellon University researchers have developed techniques for combining the views of 480 video cameras mounted in a two-story geodesic dome to perform large-scale 3D motion reconstruction, including volleyball games, the swirl of air currents and even a cascade of confetti.
National Science Foundation, Samsung

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 17-Jul-2014
Journal of Extreme Events
Is the US National Flood Insurance Program affordable?
The paper examines the challenges in offering risk-based premiums and affordability of flood insurance through a case study of Ocean County, New Jersey, an area heavily damaged by Hurricane Sandy. The authors of the paper argue that the National Flood Insurance Program must address affordability concerns, but that this should not be done through discounted premiums.
Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events, Center for Research on Environmental Decisions, Travelers Foundation, National Science Foundation, Wharton Risk Management and Decision Processes Center

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
65-644-65775
World Scientific

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cell membrane proteins give up their secrets
Rice scientists have succeeded in analyzing transmembrane proteins in the same way they study how globular proteins fold. The results should open up new possibilities for researchers who study proteins for their implications in disease and drug design.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jeff Falk
jfalk@rice.edu
713-348-6775
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
70-foot-long, 52-ton concrete bridge survives series of simulated earthquakes
A 70-foot-long, 52-ton concrete bridge survived a series of earthquakes in the first multiple-shake-table experiment in the University of Nevada, Reno's new Earthquake Engineering Lab, the newest addition to the world-renowned earthquake and seismic engineering facility.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Mike Wolterbeek
mwolterbeek@unr.edu
University of Nevada, Reno

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Making a mental match: Pairing a mechanical device with stroke patients
Georgia Tech researchers have created a functional MRI-compatible hemiparesis rehab device that creates a long latency stretch reflex at the exact time as a brain signal. It is designed to assist stroke victims.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jason Maderer
maderer@gatech.edu
404-385-2966
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Technology
Aqueous two-phase systems enable multiplexing of homogeneous immunoassays
A novel test simplifies disease detection by enabling simultaneous detection of multiple proteins in blood plasma.
University of Michigan, National Science Foundation, Amy Strelzer Manasevit Research Program, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Space and Naval Warfare Command Pacific

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
65-646-65775
World Scientific

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Nature
New view of Rainier's volcanic plumbing
By measuring how fast Earth conducts electricity and seismic waves, a University of Utah researcher and colleagues made a detailed picture of Mount Rainier's deep volcanic plumbing and partly molten rock that will erupt again someday.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 16-Jul-2014
Nature
Study: Climate-cooling arctic lakes soak up greenhouse gases
New University of Alaska Fairbanks research indicates that arctic thermokarst lakes stabilize climate change by storing more greenhouse gases than they emit into the atmosphere.
National Science Foundation, US Geological Survey, University of Alaska Fairbanks, The Alfred Wegener Institute

Contact: Marmian Grimes
mlgrimes@alaska.edu
907-474-7902
University of Alaska Fairbanks

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry C
3-D nanostructure could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage
A three-dimensional porous nanostructure would have a balance of strength, toughness and ability to transfer heat that could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage and composite materials that perform multiple functions, according to engineers at Rice University.
Rice University, National Institutes of Health, IBM, CISCO, Qlogic, Adaptive Computing, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Journal of General Physiology
Protein's 'hands' enable bacteria to establish infection, research finds
Kansas State University biochemists have discovered how protein's 'hands' enable bacteria to establish infection. The research may help scientists develop targeted treatment and intervention methods.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Phillip Klebba
peklebba@k-state.edu
785-532-6121
Kansas State University

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
eLife
Hidden variations in neuronal networks may explain traumatic brain injury outcomes
A team of researchers at the Neuroscience Institute at Georgia State University has discovered that hidden differences in the properties of neural circuits can account for whether animals are behaviorally susceptible to brain injury. These results could have implications for the treatment of brain trauma.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Natasha De Veauuse Brown
ndeveauusebrown@gsu.edu
404-413-3602
Georgia State University

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
eLife
Hidden variations in neuronal networks may explain differences in brain injury outcomes
A team of researchers at the Neuroscience Institute at Georgia State University has discovered that hidden differences in the properties of neural circuits can account for whether animals are behaviorally susceptible to brain injury. These results could have implications for the treatment of brain trauma.
March of Dimes Foundation, National Science Foundation, Brains and Behavior Program in Georgia State University's Neuroscience Institute

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 15-Jul-2014
Scientists launch far-ranging campaign to detail Front Range air pollution
Scientists at NCAR and partner organizations are launching a major field project across Colorado's Front Range this month to track ozone pollution. Results from the month-long study, which uses aircraft, ground sensors, and other instruments, will provide needed information to officials to ensure that air in the region is healthy.
Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, National Science Foundation

Contact: David Hosansky
hosansky@ucar.edu
303-497-8611
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Showing releases 326-350 out of 815.

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