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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 351-375 out of 813.

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Public Release: 14-May-2015
Nano Letters
CLAIRE brings electron microscopy to soft materials
Berkeley Lab researchers, working at the Molecular Foundry, have invented a technique called 'CLAIRE' that extends the incredible resolution of electron microscopy to the noninvasive nanoscale imaging of soft matter, including biomolecules.
US Department of Energy Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-May-2015
Science
Revealing the ocean's hidden fertilizer
Phosphorus is one of the most common substances on Earth. An essential nutrient for every living organism -- humans require approximately 700 milligrams per day -- we are rarely concerned about consuming enough of it because it is present in most of the foods we eat. Despite its ubiquity and living organisms' utter dependence on it, we know surprisingly little about how it moves, or cycles, through the ocean environment.
National Science Foundation, Simons Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 13-May-2015
Nature
Two Large Hadron Collider experiments first to observe rare subatomic process
Two experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, have combined their results and observed a previously unseen subatomic process.
DOE/Office of Science, National Science Foundation

Contact: Andre Salles
media@fnal.gov
630-840-3351
DOE/Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

Public Release: 13-May-2015
Physical Review Letters
Researchers build new fermion microscope
A team of MIT physicists has built a microscope that is able to see up to 1,000 individual fermionic atoms. The researchers devised a laser-based technique to trap and freeze fermions in place, and image the particles simultaneously.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Office of Naval Research, Army Research Office, David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 13-May-2015
ACS Nano
New nanomaterials inspired by bird feathers play with light to create color
Inspired by the way iridescent bird feathers play with light, scientists have created thin films of material in a wide range of pure colors -- from red to green -- with hues determined by physical structure rather than pigments. Chemists synthesized and assembled nanoparticles of a synthetic version of melanin to mimic the natural structures found in bird feathers.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 13-May-2015
Nature
Study reveals how rivers regulate global carbon cycle
River transport of carbon to the ocean is not on a scale that will solve our CO2 problem, but we haven't known how much carbon the world's rivers routinely flush into the ocean, until now. A study by WHOI scientists calculated the first direct estimate of how much and in what form organic carbon is exported by rivers. The estimate will help modelers predict how this export may shift as Earth's climate changes.
National Science Foundation, Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 13-May-2015
PLOS ONE
Trap-jaw ants jump with their jaws to escape the antlion's den
Some species of trap-jaw ants use their spring-loaded mandibles to hurl themselves out of harm's way when an ant-trapping predator stalks, researchers report in the journal PLOS ONE. This dramatic maneuver doubles the ants' survival when other escape methods fail, the researchers found. (See video.)
National Geographic Society Committee for Research and Exploration, National Science Foundation, American Museum of Natural History

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Molecular switch that promotes heart cell maturation discovered
The difficulty in getting stem cells to mature into more adult-like heart cells has hindered the search for regenerative treatments for hearts damaged by disease. A molecular switch has now been discovered that appears to help embryonic heart cells switch from a glucose to fatty acid based metabolism. They become larger, stronger, and look and act like more mature heart cells. This discovery may lead to lab methods to grow heart cells that function more like those in adult hearts.
National Institutes of Health, Teitze Young Scientist Award, National Science Foundation, Hahn Family, University of Washington Stem Cell & Regenerative Medicine Research Institute

Contact: Leila Gray
leilag@uw.edu
206-685-0381
University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Scientific Reports
Male hormones help lemur females rule
Lemur girls behave more like the guys, thanks to a little testosterone, finds a new study. When it comes to conventional gender roles, lemurs -- distant primate cousins of ours -- buck the trend. Duke University researchers say females have significantly lower testosterone levels than the males across the board. But when they compared six lemur species, they found that females of species where females dominate have higher testosterone than females of more egalitarian species.
National Science Foundation, Margot Marsh Biodiversity Foundation

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 12-May-2015
NetSage tool will help us understand big data networks
Every day, scientists around the world rely on robust data networks to share petabytes of data with their colleagues. A new $5 million, five-year National Science Foundation grant, awarded to Indiana University, the UC Davis and the University of Hawaii at Manoa, seeks to bolster these networks by enabling unprecedented measurement and analysis.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Cancer Research
siRNA-toting nanoparticles inhibit breast cancer metastasis
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University combined finely crafted nanoparticles with one of nature's potent disrupters to prevent the spread of triple-negative breast cancer in mouse models. The researchers are working toward clinical trials and exploring use of the technology for other cancers and diseases.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, US Department of Defense

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Protein & Cell
Exogenous microRNAs in maternal food pass through placenta, regulate fetal gene expression
In a new study published in the Protein & Cell, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University reports that small non-coding RNAs in maternal food can transfer through placenta to regulate fetal gene expression.
National Basic Research Program for China, National Science Foundation of China, Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education

Contact: Xi Chen
lisacx86@nju.edu.cn
86-258-359-2705
Nanjing University School of Life Sciences

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Optics Letters
CU Anschutz researchers create microscope allowing deep brain exploration
A team of neuroscientists and bioengineers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have created a miniature, fiber-optic microscope designed to peer deeply inside a living brain.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Kelly
david.kelly@ucdenver.edu
303-503-7990
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Public Release: 12-May-2015
Unique program to use social media to develop computer model for Ebola spread
Identifying and tracking individuals affected by the Ebola virus in densely populated areas presents a unique and urgent set of challenges in public health surveillance. Currently, mapping the spread of the Ebola virus is done manually. An innovative model of Ebola spread will use massive amounts of data from various sources including Twitter feeds, Facebook and Google.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Gisele Galoustian
ggaloust@fau.edu
561-297-2676
Florida Atlantic University

Public Release: 12-May-2015
The Cryosphere
New study shows Antarctic ice shelf is thinning from above and below
A decade-long scientific debate about what's causing the thinning of one of Antarctica's largest ice shelves is settled this week with the publication of an international study in the journal The Cryosphere.
Natural Environment Research Council, National Science Foundation

Contact: Athena Dinar
amdi@bas.ac.uk
44-122-322-1441
British Antarctic Survey

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Applied Physics Letters
New device could greatly improve speech and image recognition
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering and the Russian Academy of Sciences have successfully demonstrated pattern recognition using a magnonic holographic memory device, a development that could greatly improve speech and image recognition hardware.
National Science Foundation, Semiconductor Research Corporation, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Tortoise approach works best -- even for evolution
When it comes to winning evolutionary fitness races, the tortoise once again prevails over the hare. In the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team of BEACON scientists centered at Michigan State University found that limiting migrations among populations of bacteria produced better adaptations.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Nature Geoscience
A climate signal in the global distribution of copper deposits
Climate helps drive the erosion process that exposes economically valuable copper deposits and shapes the pattern of their global distribution, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Idaho and the University of Michigan.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 11-May-2015
NSF funds a unique program to train graduate STEM students
A curriculum in density-functional theory for graduate students in STEM fields is the goal of a National Science Foundation grant of nearly $3 million over five years awarded to a team of Penn State faculty.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Molecular Ecology
Long-term study on ticks reveals shifting migration patterns, disease risks
Over nearly 15 years spent studying ticks, Indiana University's Keith Clay has found southern Indiana to be an oasis free from Lyme disease, the condition most associated with these arachnids that are the second most common parasitic disease vector on Earth. He has also seen signs that this low-risk environment is changing, both in Indiana and in other regions of the US.
NSF/NIH Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases Program

Contact: Kevin Fryling
kfryling@iu.edu
317-278-0088
Indiana University

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Massive southern invasions by northern birds linked to climate shifts
Scientists have pinpointed the climate pattern that likely sets the stage for boreal bird irruptions in which vast numbers of northern birds migrate far south of their usual winter range. The discovery could make it possible to predict the events more than a year in advance.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joe Rojas-Burke
joe.rojas@utah.edu
801-585-6861
University of Utah

Public Release: 11-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists obtain precise estimates of the epigenetic mutation rate
University of Groningen scientists have obtained the first precise estimates of how often epigenetic marks that influence gene activity appear or disappear in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, a model organism in plant biology. This paves the way to a deeper understanding of the importance of epigenetic changes in plant evolution. The work is published in the online Early Edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Rene Fransen
r.fransen@rug.nl
University of Groningen

Public Release: 8-May-2015
$2 million NSF grant supports research into emerging nanomaterials
A $2 million grant from the National Science Foundation will allow researchers led by Rensselaer Professor Humberto Terrones to explore the structure and capabilities of transition metal dichalcogenides, layered nanomaterials with intriguing optical and electronic properties.
National Science Foundation Office of Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation

Contact: Mary Martialay
518-276-2146
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 8-May-2015
Nature Communications
Environmental exposure to hormones used in animal agriculture greater than expected
Research by an Indiana University environmental scientist and colleagues at universities in Iowa and Washington finds that potentially harmful growth-promoting hormones used in beef production are expected to persist in the environment at higher concentrations and for longer durations than previously thought.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Public Release: 7-May-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Penn researchers develop custom artificial membranes with programmable surfaces
Penn researchers have helped develop artificial membranes with programmable features, enabling studies of cell communication and the molecular basis of disease.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Showing releases 351-375 out of 813.

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