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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 376-400 out of 826.

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Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
UH professor honored for materials research, STEM outreach
University of Houston mathematician Yuliya Gorb recently received a five-year, $420,000 National Science Foundation CAREER Award for both her research and an outreach program she's developing for high school girls. Gorb is the first Department of Mathematics faculty member to receive an NSF CAREER award while at University of Houston.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lisa Merkl
lkmerkl@uh.edu
713-743-8192
University of Houston

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
PLOS ONE
Now researchers can see how unfolded proteins move in the cell
When a large protein unfolds in transit through a cell, it slows down and can get stuck in traffic. Using a specialized microscope -- a sort of cellular traffic camera -- University of Illinois chemists now can watch the way the unfolded protein diffuses. Studying the relationship between protein folding and transport could provide great insight into protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's
National Science Foundation

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
It doesn't add up: People who say they are good at math, but aren't
Thinking you're good at math and actually being good at it are not the same thing, new research has found. About one in five people who say they are bad at math in fact score in the top half of those taking an objective math test. But one-third of people who say they are good at math actually score in the bottom half.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Ellen Peters
Peters.498@osu.edu
614-688-3477
Ohio State University

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Multiple, short learning sessions strengthen memory formation in fragile X syndrome
A learning technique that maximizes the brain's ability to make and store memories may help overcome cognitive issues seen in fragile X syndrome, a leading form of intellectual disability, according to University of California Irvine neurobiologists.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, William & Nancy Thompson Family Foundation

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Global Ecology and Conservation
Conservation targeting tigers pushes leopards to change
A leopard may not be able to change its spots, but new research from a World Heritage site in Nepal indicates that leopards do change their activity patterns in response to tigers and humans -- but in different ways.
US Fish and Wildlife Service Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Fund, National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Sue Nichols
nichols@msu.edu
517-432-0206
Michigan State University

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Penn researchers show commonalities in how different glassy materials fail
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have now shown an important commonality that seems to extend through the range of glassy materials. They have demonstrated that the scaling between a glassy material's stiffness and strength remains unchanged, implying a constant critical strain that these materials can withstand before catastrophic failure, despite the extreme variation found among this class of material's physical properties.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Geophysical Research Letters
Warmer Pacific Ocean could release millions of tons of seafloor methane
Water off Washington's coast is warming a third of a mile down, where seafloor methane shifts from a frozen solid to a gas. Calculations suggest ocean warming is already releasing significant methane offshore of Alaska to Northern California.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Geophysical Review Letters
Temperature anomalies are warming faster than Earth's average
It's widely known that the Earth's average temperature has been rising. But research by an Indiana University geographer and colleagues finds that spatial patterns of extreme temperature anomalies -- readings well above or below the mean -- are warming even faster than the overall average.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Scientific Reports
Ancient balloon-shaped animal fossil sheds light on Earth's ancient seas
A rare 520 million year old fossil shaped like a 'squashed bird's nest' that will help to shed new light on life within Earth's ancient seas has been discovered in China by an international research team -- and will honor the memory of a University of Leicester scientist who passed away earlier this year.
National Science Foundation in China, Royal Society in the UK

Contact: Tom Harvey
thph2@le.ac.uk
44-011-625-23644
University of Leicester

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
PLOS Biology
Birdsong study reveals how brain uses timing during motor activity
Timing is key for brain cells controlling a complex motor activity like the singing of a bird, finds a new study published by PLOS Biology. The findings are the first to suggest that fine-scale timing of neurons is at least as important in motor systems as in sensory systems, and perhaps more critical.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, James S. McDonnell Foundation

Contact: Megan McRainey
megan.mcrainey@emory.edu
404-727-6167
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 9-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Can organic crops compete with industrial agriculture?
An analysis of 115 studies comparing organic and conventional farming finds that the crop yields of organic agriculture are higher than previously thought. Researchers also found that taking into account methods that optimize the productivity of organic agriculture could minimize the yield gap between organic and conventional farming.
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Postdoctoral Fellowship

Contact: Sarah Yang
scyang@berkeley.edu
510-643-7741
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Science Express
New technique could harvest more of the sun's energy
As solar panels become less expensive and capable of generating more power, solar energy is becoming a more commercially viable alternative source of electricity. However, the photovoltaic cells now used to turn sunlight into electricity can only absorb and use a small fraction of that light, and that means a significant amount of solar energy goes untapped. A new technology created by researchers from Caltech represents a first step toward harnessing that lost energy.
Department of Energy, Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Kent State's SOLE Center researchers to study informal STEM learning experiences
While most can agree that STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) experiences outside of school can be exciting and engaging for young people, there is much that isn't known about its impact on short-term and long-term learning. That's why the National Science Foundation has recently awarded Kent State University, and its collaborative partners, a $115,000 grant to develop a prototype assessment tool to map informal STEM learning experiences.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Bradley Morris
bmorri20@kent.edu
330-672-2294
Kent State University

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Geosphere
Re-thinking Southern California earthquake scenarios in Coachella Valley, San Andreas Fault
New 3-D numerical modeling that captures far more geometric complexity of an active fault segment in southern California than any other, suggests that the overall earthquake hazard for towns on the west side of the Coachella Valley such as Palm Springs and Palm Desert may be slightly lower than previously believed.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Solid-state proteins maximize the intensity of fluorescent-protein-based lasers
The same research team that developed the first laser based on a living cell has shown that use of fluorescent proteins in a solid form rather than in solution greatly increases the intensity of light produced, an accomplishment that takes advantage of natural protein structures surrounding the light-emitting portions of the protein molecules.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Department of Defense, Korea National Research Foundation grant

Contact: Cassandra Aviles
cmaviles@partners.org
617-724-6433
Massachusetts General Hospital

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Penn State shares in NSF Critical Zone collaboration grant
Understanding of the Critical Zone, which stretches from tree tops to the deepest fresh groundwater -- the place where rock, soil, water, air and living organisms interact and shape Earth's surface -- will get a needed boost funded by a $1.35 million grant from the National Science Foundation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting
Disorder in gene-control system is a defining characteristic of cancer, study finds
The genetic tumult within cancerous tumors is more than matched by the disorder in one of the mechanisms for switching cells' genes on and off, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard report in a new study. Their findings, published online today in the journal Cancer Cell, indicate that the disarray in the on-off mechanism -- known as methylation -- is one of the defining characteristics of cancer and helps tumors adapt to changing circumstances.
NIH/National Cancer Institute, NIH/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, Blavatnik Family Foundation, Stand Up to Cancer, Melton and Rosenbach Funds, American Cancer Society, National Science Foundation, Leukemia and Lymphoma Society

Contact: Anne Doerr
Anne_Doerr@dfci.harvard.edu
617-632-4090
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Nature Communications
Unusual electronic state found in new class of unconventional superconductors
Scientists have discovered an unusual form of electronic order in a new family of unconventional superconductors, giving scientists a new group of materials to explore to understand ability to carry current with no energy loss.
Department of Energy Office of Science, US National Science Foundation, Japan Society of the Promotion of Science, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Friends of Todai Inc.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 8-Dec-2014
Small
New technique allows low-cost creation of 3-D nanostructures
Researchers have developed a new lithography technique that uses nanoscale spheres to create 3-D structures with biomedical, electronic and photonic applications. The new technique is less expensive than conventional methods and does not rely on stacking two-dimensional patterns to create 3-D structures.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
Science
45-year physics mystery shows a path to quantum transistors
An odd, iridescent material that's puzzled physicists for decades turns out to be an exotic state of matter that could open a new path to quantum computers and other next-generation electronics.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 5-Dec-2014
Nature
Looking at El Niño's past to predict its future
Scientists see a large amount of variability in the El Niņo-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) when looking back at climate records from thousands of years ago. Without a clear understanding of what caused past changes in ENSO variability, predicting the climate phenomenon's future is a difficult task. A new study shows how this climate system responds to various pressures, such as changes in carbon dioxide and ice cover, in one of the best models used to project future climate change.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science
Greenhouse gases linked to past African rainfall
New research, led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research, demonstrates for the first time that an increase in greenhouse gas concentrations thousands of years ago was a key factor in causing substantially more rainfall in two major regions of Africa. The finding provides new evidence that the current increase in greenhouse gases will have an important impact on Africa's future climate.
National Science Foundation, Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Hosansky
hosansky@ucar.edu
303-497-8611
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
IU collaboration to develop computational model of acetaminophen-induced liver failure
Three Indiana University professors have received $2.1 million to develop a computational model of acetaminophen-induced liver failure -- the leading cause of liver failure in the United States -- by using advanced microscopic and computational technologies that allow scientists to see into the liver of a living animal.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Food and Drug Administration, National Aeronautical and Space Administration, Department of Defense and the Department of Energy

Contact: Steve Chaplin
stjchap@iu.edu
812-856-1896
Indiana University

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science
Electric eels deliver Taser-like shocks
A Vanderbilt biologist has determined that electric eels possess an electroshock system uncannily similar to a Taser.
National Science Foundation, National Academy of Sciences, Guggenheim Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 4-Dec-2014
Science
Greenhouse gases linked to African rainfall
Scientists may have solved a long-standing enigma known as the African Humid Period -- an intense increase in cumulative rainfall in parts of Africa that began after a long dry spell following the end of the last ice age and lasting nearly 10,000 years. It has been linked to greenhouse gas concentrations.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Peter Clark
clarkp@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1247
Oregon State University

Showing releases 376-400 out of 826.

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