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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 401-425 out of 934.

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Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
2016 IEEE Symposium on 3-D User Interfaces
Fighting virtual reality sickness
Columbia Engineering Professor Steven K. Feiner has developed a way to combat virtual reality sickness that can be applied to consumer head-worn VR displays, such as the Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, Sony PlayStation VR, and Google Cardboard. Their approach dynamically, yet subtly, changes the user's field of view in response to visually perceived motion, as the user virtually traverses an environment while remaining physically stationary, and significantly reduces VR sickness.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Holly Evarts
holly.evarts@columbia.edu
347-453-7408
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Public Release: 14-Jun-2016
228th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society
Science
Prebiotic molecule detected in interstellar cloud
For the first time, a chiral molecule has been detected outside of our solar system. The discovery is an important step to understanding the origins of life.
National Science Foundation, NASA Astrobiology Institute, National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Contact: Deborah Williams-Hedges
debwms@caltech.edu
626-395-3227
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Electronic bacteria sensor is potential future tool for medicine and food safety
A new type of electronic sensor that might be used to quickly detect and classify bacteria for medical diagnostics and food safety has passed a key hurdle by distinguishing between dead and living bacteria cells.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Scientific Reports
Marine life quickly recovered after global mass extinction
Reptiles rapidly invaded the seas soon after a global extinction wiped out most life on Earth, according to a new study led by UC Davis researchers.
National Natural Science Foundation of China, National Science Foundation, National Geographic Society

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Natural quasicrystals may be the result of collisions between objects in the asteroid belt
Experiment demonstrates that natural quasicrystals may have been formed by high-energy shocks between objects in the asteroid belt.
National Science Foundation, University of Florence, NSF-Materials Research Science & Engineering Centers Program, New York University and Princeton Center for Complex Materials

Contact: Robert Perkins
rperkins@caltech.edu
626-395-1862
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Functional Ecology
Algorithm ranks thermotolerance of algae
A new tool developed at Northwestern University could play an important role in the race to save coral reefs and in any application that relies on rankings.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Climate Change
Carbon dioxide biggest player in thawing permafrost
Carbon dioxide emissions from dry and oxygen-rich environments will likely strengthen the climate forcing impact of thawing permafrost on top of methane release from oxygen-poor wetlands in the Arctic, according to a study led by Northern Arizona University assistant research professor Christina Schädel.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Christina Schadel
christina.schadel@nau.edu
928-523-9588
Northern Arizona University

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Organic Letters
Rice University's nanosubs gain better fluorescent properties for tracking
Rice University's single-molecule nanosubmersibles get enhanced fluorescence for better tracking. The vehicles are being developed to carry drugs and other cargo through a solution.
National Science Foundation, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, Yamada Science Foundation, Israel Science Foundation, European Research Council

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Watching 'jumping genes' in action
Scientists have observed jumping gene activity in real time within living cells.
National Science Foundation, NASA, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Contact: Siv Schwink
sschwink@illinois.edu
217-300-2201
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Materials
Ferroelectric materials react unexpectedly to strain
Under too much strain, layered perovskite ferroelectrics turn off their polarization, Northwestern University researchers have found.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Energy & Environmental Science
Chemicals from wood waste
Vitamins, medication, solvents, crop protection products and polymers -- in future, it will be possible to manufacture many of these from wood waste. The processes will also be at least as cost-effective, environmentally friendly and safe as current oil-based processes. This has been demonstrated by an international team of researchers headed by ETH scientists.
Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Dr. Konrad Hungerbühler
konrad.hungerbuehler@chem.ethz.ch
41-446-326-098
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Genes & Development
Starving cancer cells by blocking their metabolism
Scientists at EPFL have found a way to starve liver cancer cells by blocking a protein that is required for glutamine breakdown -- while leaving normal cells intact. The discovery opens new ways to treat liver cancer.
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Swiss Cancer League, Swiss National Science Foundation, Novartis Consumer Health Foundation

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Nature Cell Biology
Reclaiming the immune system's assault on tumors
One of the major obstacles with treating cancer is that tumors can conscript the body's immune cells and make them work for them. Researchers at EPFL have now found a way to reclaim the corrupted immune cells, turn them into signals for the immune system to attack the tumor, and even prevent metastasis.
Swiss National Science Foundation, Fondation pour la lutte contre le cancer, Swiss Federal Commission for Scholarships for Foreign Students, F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Arc volcano releases mix of material from Earth's mantle and crust
Basalt from a common type of volcano shows a surprising contribution from the descending oceanic plate. Analyses show that magnesium atoms are somehow drawn out of the crust, deep below the surface.
National Science Foundation, French National Research Agency

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Where were you born? Origin matters for species interactions
Based on experiments with two species of beetle, ecologists from Rice University and Louisiana State University have determined that the early life experiences of individuals that migrate between local habitats can have wide-reaching impacts on the distribution of species across entire ecosystems.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Success in second language learning linked to genetic and brain measures
A new study by researchers at the University of Washington shows that the final grades that college students received in a second-language class were predicted by a combination of genetic and brain factors.
National Science Foundation's UW Life Center, Ready Mind Project at I-LABS

Contact: Molly McElroy
mollywmc@uw.edu
206-221-1684
University of Washington

Public Release: 13-Jun-2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Current diversity pattern of North American mammals a 'recent' trend, study finds
It's called the latitudinal diversity gradient, a phenomenon seen today in most plant and animal species around the world: Biodiversity decreases from the equator to higher latitudes. A new study of fossils representing 63 million of the past 65 million years reveals that -- for North American mammals, at least - the modern LDG is the exception rather than the rule.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Yates, Life Sciences Editor, U. of I. News Bureau
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
UTA professor earns NSF grant to make lasers, amplifiers for silicon photonics technology
A University of Texas at Arlington researcher will explore the possibility of using a novel optical resonance effect in nanostructured silicon films to generate light, which could lead to more efficient and compact integrated photonic-electric circuits.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Herb Booth
hbooth@uta.edu
817-272-7075
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment
Supporting pollinators could have big payoff for Texas cotton farmers
According to a new study, increasing the diversity of pollinator species can dramatically increase cotton production. In South Texas alone, this could boost cotton production by up to 18 percent, yielding an increase in annual revenue of more than $1.1 million.
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, Winkler Family Foundation

Contact: Marc Airhart
mairhart@austin.utexas.edu
512-232-1066
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Limnology & Oceanography
Study finds native Olympia oysters more resilient to ocean acidification
Native Olympia oysters, which once thrived along the Pacific Northwest coast until over-harvesting and habitat loss all but wiped them out, have a built-in resistance to ocean acidification during a key shell-building phase after spawning, according to a newly published study. Researchers believe this may have implications for the future of the commercial oyster industry.
National Science Foundation

Contact: George Waldbusser
waldbuss@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8964
Oregon State University

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Science
New tool brings personalized medicine closer
Scientists from EPFL and ETHZ have developed a powerful tool for exploring and determining the inherent biological differences between individuals, which overcomes a major hurdle for personalized medicine.
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, ETH Zurich, European Research Council, Swiss Initiative for Systems Biology, Swiss National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 10-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
Disjointed: Cell differences may explain why rheumatoid arthritis varies by location
Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Pennsylvania and China, report that not only are there distinct differences in key cellular processes and molecular signatures between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) but, more surprisingly, there are joint-specific differences in RA. The findings help explain why drugs treating RA vary in effect and provide a potential new template for precisely targeting treatment for each and every ailing joint.
Rheumatology Research Foundation, Arthritis Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Science Foundation

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 9-Jun-2016
Nature Chemistry
Oregon chemists build a new, stable open-shell molecule
University of Oregon chemists have synthesized a stable and long-lasting carbon-based molecule that, they say, potentially could be applicable in solar cells and electronic devices.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 9-Jun-2016
Nature Communications
Study finds link between 2015 melting Greenland ice, faster Arctic warming
A new study provides the first evidence that links melting ice in Greenland to a phenomenon known as Arctic amplification -- faster warming of the Arctic compared to the rest of the Northern Hemisphere as sea ice disappears. The study, published today in Nature Communications, included researchers from University of Georgia, Columbia University, University of Liege, City College of New York, University of Leeds and the University of Sheffield.
NASA's Interdisciplinary Data Science Program, NASA's Cryosphere Program, National Science Foundation

Contact: Stephanie Schupska
schupska@uga.edu
706-542-6927
University of Georgia

Public Release: 9-Jun-2016
Astrophysical Journal
Likely new planet may be in slow death spiral
Astronomers searching for the galaxy's youngest planets have found compelling evidence for one unlike any other, a newborn 'hot Jupiter' whose outer layers are being torn away by the star it orbits every 11 hours.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Showing releases 401-425 out of 934.

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