National Science Foundation
Search NSF News:
NSF Main
NSF News
NSF Funded Research News
 
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 
At nsf.gov
Contacts Page
Multimedia Gallery
Media Advisories
Publications
Special Reports
Awards Search
Science & Engineering Stats
NSF & Congress
About NSF
RSS Feed RSS Feed
Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 451-475 out of 753.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 ]

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Journal of American Chemical Society
Researchers find the accelerator for molecular machines
How hard can it be to make a wheel rotate in a machine? Very hard actually, when the wheel sits in one of those nano-small molecular machines that are predicted to be running our future machines. But before the molecular machines become part of our daily lives, researchers must be able to control them. A Danish/American research team have now solved part of this problem.
Danish Ministry of Research and Higher Education, National Science Foundation, Villum Foundation

Contact: Birgitte Svennevig
birs@sdu.dk
University of Southern Denmark

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Science
Breaking up water: Controlling molecular vibrations to produce hydrogen
Converting methane into hydrogen is crucial for clean energy and agriculture. This reaction requires water and a catalyst. Publishing in Science, EPFL researchers have used a novel laser approach to control specific vibrations of a water molecule, which can affect the efficiency of the reaction.
Swiss National Science Foundation, École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne, National Science Foundation

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Current Biology
How do our cells move? Liquid droplets could explain
Living cells move; not just bacteria, but also cells in our own bodies. EPFL scientists have discovered a new relationship between the three-dimensional shape of the cell and its ability to migrate. The work has important implications for the fundamental understanding of cell movement and for practical applications like tissue engineering.
Swiss National Science Foundation, Swiss SystemsX.ch

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Science
Decoding the chemical vocabulary of plants
Plants spend their entire lifetime rooted to one spot. When faced with a bad situation, such as a swarm of hungry herbivores or a viral outbreak, they have no option to flee but instead must fight to survive. What is the key to their defense? Chemistry. Understanding how plants evolved this prodigious chemical vocabulary has been a longstanding goal in plant biology.
National Science Foundation, Becas Chile-Conicyt

Contact: Seung Yon (Sue) Rhee
srhee@CarnegieScience.edu
650-739-4251
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 1-May-2014
Science
Viruses hijack deep-sea bacteria at hydrothermal vents
More than a mile beneath the ocean's surface, as dark clouds of mineral-rich water billow from seafloor hot springs called hydrothermal vents, unseen armies of viruses and bacteria wage war.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Algae 'see' a wide range of light
Aquatic algae can sense an unexpectedly wide range of color, allowing them to sense and adapt to changing light conditions in lakes and oceans. The study by researchers at UC Davis was published earlier this year in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture, US Department of Defense, the Packard Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Nano Letters
New revolutionary sensor links pressure to color change
A high-resolution pressure sensor developed at the University of California, Riverside indicates pressure by varying its color -- a sensor that all of us can use with just our eyes. This sensor differs from commercially available pressure sensor films. The new technology produces a mosaic of easy-to-distinguish colors and has the benefit of higher contrast and resolution. It can potentially be used in many safety devices for revealing pressure distribution over even very complex surfaces.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Nature Materials
Playing pool with carbon atoms
A discovery by UA researchers brings graphene -- thin layers of pencil lead -- one step closer to replacing silicon in future technologies such as faster and smaller microprocessors.
US Army Research Laboratory, US Department of Education, National Science Foundation, Spanish Ministry of Economy, European Commission

Contact: Daniel Stolte
stolte@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4402
University of Arizona

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Seeing the bedrock through the trees
When estimating runoff and erosion on hillslopes, most scientists consider only the soil. But the weathered bedrock underneath may plan an equally important role in channeling water, nourishing plants and shaping the landscape, according to UC Berkeley geologists. William Dietrich and Daniella Rempe propose a model to predict the depth of weathered bedrock from easily measured parameters, providing a bottom-up approach to predicting topography and improving climate models that now take only soil into account.
Keck, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Monthly Weather Review
Multiple consecutive days of tornado activity spawn worst events
Significant tornado outbreaks and especially strong tornadoes are more likely occur within periods of activity lasting three or more days, according to a tornado expert. An examination of 30 years of US weather records found that an outbreak of 20 or more reported tornadoes had a 74 percent probability of occurring during a period of tornado activity lasting three or more days. During those same periods, a tornado rated three or higher on the Enhanced Fujita scale had a 60 percent probability of hitting.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Elizabeth K. Gardner
ekgardner@purdue.edu
765-494-2081
Purdue University

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Nature
Competition for ecological niches limits the formation of new species
The rate at which new species evolve is limited by competition for ecological niches, report scientists from the University of Chicago in Nature on April 30. The study, which analyzes the evolutionary and genetic relationships between all 461 songbird species that live in the Himalayan mountains, suggests that as ecological niches within an environment are filled, the formation of new species slows or even stops.
National Science Foundation, National Geographic Society

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
404-819-3247
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computer Systems
Social media users need help to adjust to interface changes
Social media companies that give users a greater sense of control can ease them into interface changes, as well as curb defections to competitors, according to researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matthew Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Sample of a frog's slimy skin predicts susceptibility to disease, says CU-Boulder
A simple sample of the protective mucus layer that coats a frog's skin can now be analyzed to determine how susceptible the frog is to disease, thanks to a technique developed by a researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder.
Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Douglas Woodhams
dwoodhams@gmail.com
720-245-5828
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Child Development
Babies recognize real-life objects from pictures as early as 9 months
Babies begin to learn about the connection between pictures and real objects by the time they are nine-months-old, according to a new study by scientists at Royal Holloway, University of London, and the University of South Carolina.
National Science Foundation, Economic and Social Research Council

Contact: Paul Teed
paul.teed@rhul.ac.uk
01-784-443-967
Royal Holloway, University of London

Public Release: 30-Apr-2014
Child Development
Out of sight but not out of mind: Babies transfer learning from pictures to real objects by 9 months
A new study has found that by nine months babies can learn about an object from a picture of it. The study, which included about 30 British, predominately White eight to nine month olds, also found that babies can learn about an object from a black and white or color photo of that object. These findings have implications for parents and caregivers; before their first birthdays, children are learning about the real world from pictures.
National Science Foundation, Economic and Social Research Council

Contact: Hannah Klein
hklein@srcd.org
202-289-0320
Society for Research in Child Development

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Astrophysical Journal
The intergalactic medium unveiled: Caltech's Cosmic Web Imager
Caltech astronomers have taken unprecedented images of the intergalactic medium -- the diffuse gas that connects galaxies throughout the universe -- with the Cosmic Web Imager, an instrument designed and built at Caltech.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Bell
bpbell@caltech.edu
626-395-5832
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
USA Science & Engineering Festival
Researchers unveil wearable computational jewelry to monitor health
Researchers from Clemson University and Dartmouth College revealed their computational jewelry to support mobile health applications at the third USA Science & Engineering Festival in Washington, D.C.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kelly Caine
caine@clemson.edu
864-656-0631
Clemson University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Environmental Engineering Science
Graphene not all good
In a first-of-its-kind study of how a material some think could transform the electronics industry moves in water, researchers at the University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering found graphene oxide nanoparticles are very mobile in lakes or streams and therefore likely to cause negative environmental impacts if released.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Physical Review Letters
Experiment on Earth demonstrates effect observed in space
Streaming jets of high-speed matter produce some of the stunning objects seen in space. Astronomers have seen them shooting out of young stars just being formed, X-ray binary stars and supermassive black holes at the centers of large galaxies. Theoretical explanations for what causes those beam-like jets have been around for years, but now an experiment by French and American researchers using extremely high-powered lasers offers experimental verification of one proposed mechanism for creating them.
National Science Foundation, Grand Equipement National de Calcul Intensif Institute for Development and Resources in Intensive Scientific Computing

Contact: Leonor Sierra
lsierra@ur.rochester.edu
585-276-6264
University of Rochester

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computer Systems
Drug monitoring information improves regimen adherence, Carnegie Mellon researchers say
In a 10-month study in the homes of older adults with chronic health problems, Carnegie Mellon University researchers found that adherence to a medication regimen improved when people had ready access to a digital display of their medication-taking record. These people were more likely to take the correct medication promptly and at the same time of day than people who didn't receive the ongoing feedback.
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Graphene only as strong as weakest link
Labs at Rice University and Georgia Tech test the fracture toughness of graphene for the first time by making and measuring 'pre-cracks' under stress.
National Science Foundation, US Office of Naval Research, Korean Institute of Machinery and Materials

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Graphene only as strong as weakest link
Labs at Rice University and Georgia Tech test the fracture toughness of graphene for the first time by making and measuring 'pre-cracks' under stress.
National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, Welch Foundation, Korean Institute of Machinery and Materials

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 29-Apr-2014
Biology Letters
The big bad wolf was right; among wasps, bigger eyes evolved the better to see social cues
Some paper wasps have variable facial patterns recognized by their sister wasps, marking either individuals or their strength, much like a karate belt. University of California Berkeley postdoctoral fellow Michael Sheehan showed that those wasps with variable facial patterns have developed bigger facets in their compound eyes, and thus better vision, in order to read these social cues. Social communication may also drive evolution of senses in other species.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Nature Geoscience
Ozone levels drop 20 percent with switch from ethanol to gasoline
A Northwestern University study by an economist and a chemist reports that when fuel prices drove residents of Sao Paulo, Brazil, to mostly switch from ethanol to gasoline in their flexible-fuel vehicles, local ozone levels dropped 20 percent. At the same time, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide concentrations tended to go up. The four-year study is the first real-world trial looking at the effects of human behavior at the pump on urban air pollution.
National Science Foundation, Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 28-Apr-2014
Ecology Letters
Studies affirm crabs killing Northeast saltmarshes
Two newly published studies by a team of Brown University researchers provide ample new evidence that the reason coastal saltmarshes are dying from Long Island to Cape Cod is that hungry crabs, left unchecked by a lack of predators, are eating the cordgrass.
National Science Foundation, Voss Environmental Fellowship Program

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Showing releases 451-475 out of 753.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 ]

  Highlights
Science360 Science360 News Service
Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Science360 News is an up-to-date view of breaking science news from around the world. We gather news from wherever science is happening, including directly from scientists, college and university press offices, popular and peer-reviewed journals, dozens of National Science Foundation science and engineering centers, and funding sources that include government agencies, not-for-profit organizations and private industry.
Charles Darwin Science for Everyone
Let NSF be your portal to the latest science and engineering news—in videos, images, podcasts, articles, features and more.
NAGC Winner - Jellyfish NSF Exclusive Special Reports
From the "Birth of the Internet" to "Jellyfish Gone Wild", these in-depth, Web-based reports explore the frontiers of science and engineering.