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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 476-500 out of 793.

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Public Release: 14-May-2014
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
@millennials wary of @twitter, #MSU study finds
A new study indicates young adults have a healthy mistrust of the information they read on Twitter.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Nature
California mountains rise as groundwater depleted in state's Central Valley
The weight of water pumped from California's agricultural heartland, the Central Valley, over the past 150 years is enough to allow Earth's crust to rebound upward, raising surrounding mountain ranges, the Sierra Nevada and Coast Ranges, some six inches. Winter rains and summer pumping cause annual up and down movements that could affect earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault, which parallels the ranges.
National Science Foundation, Miller Institute

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Scientists investigate the role of the 'silent killer' inside deep-diving animals
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and Sonoma State University have furthered science's understanding of carbon monoxide's natural characteristics and limitations by studying the gas in one of the world's best divers: the elephant seal.
Office of Naval Research, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Nature Communications
Microchip-like technology allows single-cell analysis
Engineers have developed a system similar to random access memory chips that allows the fast, efficient control and separation of individual cells. Once scaled up, the technology promises to sort and store hundreds of thousands of cells in a matter of minutes, enabling biologists to study vast arrays of single cells.
National Research Foundation of Korea, National Science Foundation, Research Triangle Materials Research Science and Engineering Center

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Manmade artificial shark skin boosts swimming
People have thought for decades that the rough skin of sharks may give them a swimming boost and now scientists from Harvard University, USA, have made the first ever realistic simulated shark skin. They also measured that the fish's sharp scales boost swimming by up to 6.6 percent while reducing the energy cost.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathryn Knight
kathryn.knight@biologists.com
44-012-234-25525
The Company of Biologists

Public Release: 13-May-2014
Protein Data Bank: 100,000 structures
Four wwPDB data centers in the US, UK and Japan support online access to three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules that help researchers understand many facets of biomedicine, agriculture, and ecology, from protein synthesis to health. This public archive of experimentally determined protein and nucleic acid structures has reached a critical milestone of 100,000 structures, thanks to the efforts of structural biologists throughout the world.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Christine Zardecki
info@rcsb.org
848-445-0103
Rutgers University

Public Release: 13-May-2014
Physical Review Letters
Radiation from early universe found key to answer major questions in physics
Astrophysicists at UC San Diego have measured the minute gravitational distortions in polarized radiation from the early universe and discovered that these ancient microwaves can provide an important cosmological test of Einstein's theory of general relativity.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 13-May-2014
Advanced Materials
UT Dallas team creates flexible electronics that change shape inside body
A team of researchers from UT Dallas has helped create flexible transistors that can grip large tissues, nerves and blood vessels without losing their electronic properties. These biologically adaptive, flexible transistors might one day help doctors learn more about what is happening inside the body, and stimulate the body for treatments.
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, National Science Foundation East Asia and Pacific Summer Institute

Contact: LaKisha Ladson
lakisha.ladson@UTDallas.edu
972-883-4183
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 13-May-2014
Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research
Follow that fish!
Research is helping unravel the complex interplay between alcohol and social behavior. In what may be the first experiment to allow ethanol-exposed and untreated zebrafish to swim freely together, those exposed to certain alcohol concentrations nearly doubled their swimming speeds when in a group--suggesting that the presence of peers substantially impacts social behavior. Most remarkably, unexposed fish modulated their behavior in the presence of a shoalmate exposed to alcohol.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Public Release: 13-May-2014
Carnegie Mellon will test Internet architecture in vehicular network and for online video
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and three other institutions will test a next-generation Internet architecture they've developed in a vehicular network in Pittsburgh and in delivering online video on a national scale. These deployments of the eXpressive Internet Architecture are made possible by a two-year, $5 million award from the National Science Foundation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 13-May-2014
Nature Photonics
Ultrafast laser technique developed to observe electron action
UCF physicist Zheng Chang and his team have developed a new ultrafast light source for observing electron motion in molecules -- made up of nuclei and electrons -- at the point before the nuclei start to move. By being able to observe what actually happens, scientists can begin to understand how an electron interacts with other electrons, which may help improve the efficiency of solar cells.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Zenaida Kotala
zenaida.kotala@ucf.edu
407-823-6120
University of Central Florida

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists from USC and NYU design a molecule that blocks cancer growth in mice
New cancer-fighting drug prevents two critical proteins from interacting by mimicking the surface topography of one protein -- like wearing a mask -- which tricks the other protein into binding with it.
National Science Foundation, New York University Perlmutter Cancer Center

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Nano Letters
Penn research combines graphene and painkiller receptor into scalable chemical sensor
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have led an effort to create an artificial chemical sensor based on one of the human body's most important receptors, one that is critical in the action of painkillers and anesthetics. In these devices, the receptors' activation produces an electrical response rather than a biochemical one, allowing that response to be read out by a computer.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Frank & Louise Groff Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 12-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Which has a more efficient 'engine': A tuna or a whale?
A large whale and a much smaller tuna each propels itself through water. Which is the more efficient swimmer? It has been difficult to compare propulsion efficiencies of animals of different sizes, but now Northwestern University researchers have developed a metric to measure individual energy consumption efficiency and make such a comparison possible. (The two are almost equally efficient.) The new metric could help in the design of cars and underwater vehicles as efficient and agile as real fish.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 11-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Revealed:Protein's role in preventing heart muscle growth leading to heart failure
Hebrew University Faculty of Medicine researchers showed for the first time that the protein Erbin is an important brake that helps prevent pathological cardiac hypertrophy. They showed that damage to this protein leads to excess growth of heart muscle, a decrease in function, and severe pathological growth of heart muscle. Their research has implications for breast cancer treatment, as Erbin interacts with the receptor Her2/ErBb2, which is overexpressed in approximately 30 percent of breast cancers.
United States Binational Science Foundation, Israeli Academy of Science, and others

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 11-May-2014
Nature Geoscience
UGA research examines fate of methane following the Deepwater Horizon spill
The 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout discharged roughly five million barrels of oil and up to 500,000 metric tonnes of natural gas into Gulf of Mexico offshore waters over a period of 84 days. In the face of a seemingly insurmountable cleanup effort, many were relieved by reports following the disaster that naturally-occurring microbes had consumed much of the gas and oil.
NOAA, Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative

Contact: Samantha Joye
mjoye@uga.edu
706-542-6818
University of Georgia

Public Release: 11-May-2014
Nature Geoscience
Hydrologists find Mississippi River network's buffering system for nitrates is overwhelmed
A new method of measuring surface water-ground water interaction along the length of the Mississippi River suggests the nitrates causing the Gulf of Mexico dead zone can not be controlled through existing natural filtration systems. The research provides valuable information for water quality efforts, including tracking of nitrogen fertilizers that flow through the river network into the gulf.
National Science Foundation

Contact: J.B. Bird
jbird@austin.utexas.edu
512-750-3512
University of Texas at Austin

Public Release: 9-May-2014
Journal of Paleontology
Paleontologists discover new fossil organism
UC Riverside paleontologists have discovered a fossil of a newly discovered organism from the Ediacara Biota. Plexus ricei was a broadly curving tube that resided on the seafloor. Individuals range in size from 5 to 80 cm long and 5 to 20 mm wide, and comprise a rigid median tubular structure and a fragile outer tubular wall. Plexus ricei evolved around 575 million years ago, disappearing from the fossil record around 540 million years ago.
National Science Foundation, NASA, Australian Research Council

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 8-May-2014
Journal of Cell Science
Ovarian cancer cells are more aggressive on soft tissues
When ovarian cancer spreads from the ovaries it almost always does so to a layer of fatty tissue that lines the gut. A new study has found that ovarian cancer cells are more aggressive on these soft tissues due to the mechanical properties of this environment. The finding is contrary to what is seen with other malignant cancer cells that seem to prefer stiffer tissues.
National Science Foundation, Georgia Tech, Emory Center for Regenerative Medicine

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 8-May-2014
Science
Plant hormone has dual role in triggering flower formation, Penn study finds
A new paper by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania published in the journal Science has revealed that a plant hormone once believed to promote flower formation in annual plants also plays a role in inhibiting flowers from forming. The dual role of this hormone, gibberellin, could be exploited to produce higher-yielding crop plants.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Katherine Unger Baillie
kbaillie@upenn.edu
215-898-9194
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 8-May-2014
Researching an endangered relationship
Imperfect together? Climate change could endanger the relationship between bees and the plants they pollinate say NJIT Researchers. That's what Daniel Bunker, assistant professor of biology at New Jersey Institute of Technology, and Ph.D. candidate Caroline DeVan intend to determine with the help of a $150,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 8-May-2014
International Union of Crystallography Journal
Rotational X-ray tracking uncovers hidden motion at the nanoscale
Over the past two decades or so, there has been increasing interest and development in measuring slow dynamics in disordered systems at the nanoscale, brought about in part from a demand for advancements in the food and consumer products industries.
National Science Foundation, DOE/Office of Science, DOE/Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Jonathan Agbenyega
ja@iucr.org
International Union of Crystallography

Public Release: 8-May-2014
Nature Communications
Bioprinting a 3D liver-like device to detoxify the blood
Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a 3-D-printed device inspired by the liver to remove dangerous toxins from the blood. The device, which is designed to be used outside the body -- much like dialysis -- uses nanoparticles to trap pore-forming toxins that can damage cellular membranes and are a key factor in illnesses that result from animal bites and stings, and bacterial infections. Their findings were published May 8 in the journal Nature Communications.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Catherine Hockmuth
chockmuth@ucsd.edu
858-822-1359
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 8-May-2014
Human Communication Research
Partisan media driving a wedge between citizens, study finds
Viewing partisan news reports from both the conservative and liberal viewpoints doesn't make people more accepting of citizens on the other side of the political fence.
National Science Foundation

Contact: R. Kelly Garrett
Garrett.258@osu.edu
614-247-7414
Ohio State University

Public Release: 8-May-2014
Science
Exploring the magnetism of a single atom
An EPFL-led research collaboration has shown for the first time the maximum theoretical limit of energy needed to control the magnetization of a single atom. The fundamental work can have great implications for the future of magnetic research and technology.
CCMX, SNSF, Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Showing releases 476-500 out of 793.

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