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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 501-525 out of 928.

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Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
Nanoquakes probe new 2-dimensional material
An international team of researchers, including scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found a new and exciting way to elucidate the properties of novel two-dimensional semiconductors. These materials have unique properties that promise better integration of optical communication with traditional silicon-based devices.
National Science Foundation, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Bavaria-California Technology Center

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists devise new method to solve significant variables conundrum
Scientists at Columbia University, the University of California, San Diego and Harvard University have presented an alternative method to address the challenge of using significant variables to make useful predictions in areas such as complex disease.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Kwon
byk2102@columbia.edu
212-854-6581
Columbia University

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Grant enables pioneering research of vast river systems in Great Plains and Asia
A five-year, $4.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation will empower researchers from multiple institutions in the US and Mongolia to develop wide-ranging scientific knowledge of river systems spanning two continents. Half the funds will support work at the University of Kansas, the lead institution on the project.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
brendan@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Scientific Reports
Response to environmental change depends on variation in corals and algae partnerships
Some corals are more protective than others of their partner algae in harsh environmental conditions, new research reveals. This individual variation among corals could reflect a greater capacity than currently is recognized to adapt to changing ocean conditions brought about by climate change.
National Science Foundation, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Renewed hope for the brain-injured
Researchers from the Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering -- from SDSU, MIT and UW -- have received $15-$20 million from the NSF to continue their work on technology that may someday help the brain-injured regain their mobility thanks to a clever workaround: a brain chip that reroutes neural signals around the injured nerves combined with a receiver that picks them up on the other side.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth Chee
bchee@mail.sdsu.edu
619-594-4563
San Diego State University

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Journal of Experimental Biology
Virginia Tech researchers take cue from spider glue in efforts to create new materials
Researchers found that the webs of sun-soaked spiders were far more resistant to UVB rays than the webs of those that hunt in the dark or shade, perhaps indicating an important adaptive trait.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lindsay Key
ltkey@vt.edu
540-231-6594
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Nature Physics
Researchers observe surprising phase transition
An ultrapure material taken to pressures greater than that in the depths of the ocean and chilled to temperatures colder than outer space has revealed an unexpected phase transition that crosses two different phase categories. The researchers observed electrons transition from a topologically ordered to a broken symmetry phase. 'To our knowledge, a transition across the two groups of phases had not been unambiguously demonstrated before, and existing theories cannot describe it,' said Gábor Csáthy, who led the research.
Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Elizabeth K. Gardner
ekgardner@purdue.edu
765-494-2081
Purdue University

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Persistence toxin promotes antibiotic resistance
Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have obtained precise pictures showing how a toxin protein, called HigB, recognizes and rips up RNA as part of its growth-inhibition function. Their findings could lead to a better understanding of the formation of persister cells and how they maintain themselves.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Quinn Eastman
qeastma@emory.edu
404-727-7829
Emory Health Sciences

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Loss of large land mammals could change landscapes forever
California scientists led by UC Berkeley paleontologist Anthony Barnosky looked at the environmental changes that occurred in North and South America after large megafauna went extinct over the past 15,000 years, and found long-lasting impacts. Particularly in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest, the loss of mammoths and mastodons affected forests and grasslands and changed the small mammal populations. Similar lasting changes could result from the extinction of large land animals today, in particular African elephants.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
'Hypercarnivores' kept massive ancient herbivores in check
Based on a series of mathematical models for the sizes of predators and prey in the late Pleistocene age (about one million to 11,000 years ago), a research team concludes that giant herbivores were not immune to predators. The largest cave hyena might have taken a 5-year-old juvenile mastodon weighing more than a ton. Hunting in packs, hyenas could bring down a 9-year-old mastodon weighing two tons.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
Karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
NYU researchers find neurological notes that help identify how we process music
NYU researchers have identified how brain rhythms are used to process music, a finding that also shows how our perception of notes and melodies can be used as a method to better understand the auditory system.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 26-Oct-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ancient babies boost Bering land bridge layover
University of Utah scientists deciphered maternal genetic material from two babies buried together in Alaska 11,500 years ago. They found the infants had different mothers and were the northernmost known kin to two lineages of Native Americans found farther south throughout North and South America. The study supports the theory that Native Americans descended from people who migrated from Asia to Bering land bridge, then spent up to 10,000 years there before moving into the Americas beginning at least 15,000 years ago.
National Science Foundation, University of Utah

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 25-Oct-2015
Virginia Tech researchers will use NSF award to probe circadian rhythms
A $750,000 National Science Foundation award will aid researchers at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech to study circadian rhythms' effects on processes that affect numerous diseases and disorders, including cancer.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tiffany Trent
ttrent@vt.edu
540-231-6822
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 23-Oct-2015
UT Dallas researcher receives NSF grant to update conflict database
The National Science Foundation has awarded a grant to a UT Dallas political science researcher to update a widely used database documenting uses of military force and threats of force among nations. Dr. Vito D'Orazio, assistant professor of political science in the School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences, will lead the project to extend coverage of the Correlates of War Projects' Militarized Interstate Dispute (MID) data through 2017.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Horner
kim.horner@utdallas.edu
972-883-4463
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 23-Oct-2015
NSF awards $2 milion to UT Dallas for international conflict projects
UT Dallas political and computer scientists have received nearly $2 million from the National Science Foundation to collaborate on two projects focused on international conflict. The first grant includes $1.5 million to create a research tool that uses big data to provide updated information on civil protests and unrest, and international conflicts. A second grant totaling $401,051 will help researchers study Colombia's efforts to protect its power grid, pipelines and other infrastructure from decades of physical assaults and cyberattacks.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Horner
kim.horner@utdallas.edu
972-883-4463
University of Texas at Dallas

Public Release: 23-Oct-2015
Waste Management
Potato harvest reduced by half
On the way from field to fork, more than half of the potato harvest is lost. This is according to a new study conducted by researchers from Agroscope and ETH Zurich.
Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Dr. Christian Willersinn
christian.willersinn@agroscope.admin.ch
41-584-803-232
ETH Zurich

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
Nature Cell Biology
Collaborative research reveals a new view of cell division
Basic research into the mechanisms of cell division, using eggs and embryos from frogs and starfish, has led researchers to an unexpected discovery about how animal cells control the forces that shape themselves. During a key point in cytokinesis a cell's cortex becomes an excitable medium resulting in waves that serve to regulate enzyme activities.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
Acta Crystallographica Section D
Deep-sea bacteria could help neutralize greenhouse gas, researchers find
A type of bacteria plucked from the bottom of the ocean could be put to work neutralizing large amounts of industrial carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere, a group of University of Florida researchers has found.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Doug Bennett
dougbennett@ufl.edu
352-273-5706
University of Florida

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
Nature
It takes a thief
The discovery by Berkeley Lab researchers of the structural basis by which bacteria are able to capture genetic information from viruses and other foreign invaders for use in their own immunological system holds promise for studying or correcting problems in human genomes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Yarris
lcyarris@lbl.gov
510-486-5375
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
OU research team selected to develop aeroecology national research training program
A research team from the University of Oklahoma has been awarded a $2.9 million National Science Foundation grant to develop an aeroecology training program that will be used as a model at OU and other universities to train graduate students from science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and other disciplines. The program will fulfill a national need to train data scientists in the field of aeroecology and its rapidly growing use of Earth-observation data for societal benefits.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jana Smith
jana.smith@ou.edu
405-325-1322
University of Oklahoma

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
Nature Communications
Researchers transform slow emitters into fast light sources
Phosphors are efficient light emitters but they're not optimal for high-speed communications because they turn on and off slowly. Researchers from Brown and Harvard have now found a way to modulate light from phosphor emitters three orders of magnitude faster using phase-change materials, which could make phosphors useful in a range of new optoelectronic applications.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Army Research Office, US Department of Education, and National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
Creating a new market for Northeast forest products
A new three-year study funded by a $390,000 National Science Foundation grant to researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is expected to show that a strong new building material known as cross laminated timber (CLT) can incorporate currently underused wood species grown in the northeast United States, creating a market for local trees and opening jobs in rural communities.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
Current Biology
CWRU biologists find keys to driving a cockroach
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have identified neurons in a cockroach's brain that control whether the insect walks slow or fast, turns right or left or downshifts to climb. Electrical stimulation selectively applied to these central-complex cells alters reflexes and consistently causes the insects to replicate movements.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
Deep-sea bacteria could help neutralize greenhouse gas, researchers find
A type of bacteria plucked from the bottom of the ocean could be put to work neutralizing large amounts of industrial carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere, a group of University of Florida researchers has found.
National Institute of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Doug Bennett
dougbennett@ufl.edu
352-273-5706
University of Florida

Public Release: 22-Oct-2015
The ties that bind: WPI researchers search for the hidden genetic code across species
When species as different as humans and yeast share common genetic elements, those snippets of DNA are likely to perform fundamental biological functions. The National Science Foundation has awarded Worcester Polytechnic Institute $768,000 to identify such elements across all known genomes of plants, animals, fungi, and other complex organisms to gain insight into the roles they play. A team led by Dmitry Korkin will conduct the search using mathematical algorithms and advanced computing technology.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michael Cohen
mcohen@wpi.edu
508-868-4778
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Showing releases 501-525 out of 928.

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