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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 501-525 out of 749.

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Public Release: 16-Dec-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Cat domestication traced to Chinese farmers 5,300 years ago
Five-thousand years before it was immortalized in a British nursery rhyme, the cat that caught the rat that ate the malt was doing just fine living alongside farmers in the ancient Chinese village of Quanhucun, a forthcoming study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has confirmed.
National Science Foundation in China

Contact: Gerry Everding
gerry_everding@wustl.edu
314-935-6357
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 15-Dec-2013
Nature
Virus grows tube to insert DNA during infection then sheds it
Researchers have discovered a tube-shaped structure that forms temporarily in a certain type of virus to deliver its DNA during the infection process and then dissolves after its job is completed.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 15-Dec-2013
Nature
Deep-sea corals record dramatic long-term shift in Pacific Ocean ecosystem
Long-lived deep-sea corals preserve evidence of a major shift in the open Pacific Ocean ecosystem since around 1850, according to a study by researchers at UC Santa Cruz. The findings indicate that changes at the base of the marine food web observed in recent decades in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre may have begun more than 150 years ago at the end of the Little Ice Age.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 13-Dec-2013
Journal of Biological Chemistry
UI researcher studies evolution on the molecular level
UI researchers describe the evolution of various forms of the enzyme "dihydrofolate reductase" as it occurred from bacteria to humans. Their paper, which appears in the Dec. 13 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, may prove useful to scientists in the design of future drugs and catalysts.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Gary Galluzzo
gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu
319-384-0009
University of Iowa

Public Release: 13-Dec-2013
Physical Review Letters
Swirls in remnants of big bang may hold clues to universe's infancy
South Pole Telescope scientists have detected for the first time a subtle distortion in the oldest light in the universe, which may help reveal secrets about the earliest moments in the universe's formation.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 13-Dec-2013
Lab on a Chip
New tech lets cholesterol-tracking smartphone users take lifesaving selfies
With a new smartphone device, you can now take an accurate iPhone camera selfie that could save your life -- it reads your cholesterol level in about a minute.
National Science Foundation, Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 13-Dec-2013
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Marine biologists unmask species diversity in coral reefs
Some corals have been found to have the ability to survive in harsh environments, according to research to be published on 7 Feb. 2014 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The researchers report previously unrecognized species diversity that had been was hiding some corals' ability to respond to climate change.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 13-Dec-2013
Advanced Functional Materials
Duke engineers make strides toward artificial cartilage
A Duke research team has developed a better recipe for synthetic replacement cartilage in joints, calling for a newly designed durable hydrogel to be poured over a three-dimensional fabric "scaffold."
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Arthritis Foundation, Collaborative Research Center, AO Foundation

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Public Release: 13-Dec-2013
Antarctic neutrino-hunting project IceCube named Breakthrough of the Year by Physics World
International high-energy physics research project IceCube has been named the 2013 Breakthrough of the Year by British magazine Physics World. The Antarctic observatory has been selected for making the first observation of cosmic neutrinos, but also for overcoming the many challenges of creating and operating a colossal detector deep under the ice at the South Pole.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sean Bettam
s.bettam@utoronto.ca
416-946-7950
University of Toronto

Public Release: 13-Dec-2013
Earth's Future
Saving the Great Plains water supply
Significant portions of the Ogalalla Aquifer, one of the largest bodies of water in the United States, are at risk of drying up if it continues to be drained at its current rate.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Layne Cameron
Layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 13-Dec-2013
Conservation Biology
Disease, not climate change, fueling frog declines in the Andes, study finds
Climate change is widely believed to be behind the rapid decline of frog populations in the Andes mountains, but a new study finds that the real culprit is a deadly fungus that has wiped out amphibian species worldwide. Researchers found that highland frogs, while tolerant of increasing temperatures, live in the optimal temperature range for Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, also known as Bd.
Amazon Conservation Association, Rufford Small Grants Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jonathan Morales
jmm1@sfsu.edu
415-338-1743
San Francisco State University

Public Release: 12-Dec-2013
2013 AGU Fall Meeting
Can we turn unwanted carbon dioxide into electricity?
Researchers are developing a new kind of geothermal power plant that will lock away unwanted carbon dioxide underground -- and use it as a tool to boost electric power generation by at least 10 times compared to existing geothermal energy approaches.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
Gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 12-Dec-2013
International Electron Devices Meeting
Low-power tunneling transistor for high-performance devices at low voltage
A new type of transistor that could make possible fast and low-power computing devices for energy-constrained applications such as smart sensor networks, implantable medical electronics and ultra-mobile computing is feasible, according to Penn State researchers. Called a near broken-gap tunnel field effect transistor, the new device uses the quantum mechanical tunneling of electrons through an ultra-thin energy barrier to provide high current at low voltage.
National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 12-Dec-2013
IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communication
Graphene-based nano-antennas may enable networks of tiny machines
By taking advantage of the unique electronic properties of the material known as graphene, researchers now believe they're on track to connect networks of nanomachines powered by small amounts of scavenged energy.
National Science Foundation

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 12-Dec-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Researchers at Penn help develop a dynamic model of tissue failure
Researchers have used a series of experiments to develop a dynamic model of the stresses that stretch growing tissue. This model is the first to take into account the complicated feedback effects of cells' molecular motors, which can respond to external stress by pulling harder on their environment, eventually tearing the tissue apart.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 12-Dec-2013
5 Michigan universities awarded NSF partnership grant to improve academic success
The National Science Foundation has awarded a collaborative $1.32 million grant to five Michigan universities for a project that will increase the academic success of underrepresented minority graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields, as well as women graduate students in gender-imbalanced fields.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 12-Dec-2013
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology
A new species of horse, 4.4 million years old
Researchers, including a scientist from Case Western Reserve University, have announced the discovery of a new species of fossil horse from 4.4 million-year-old fossil-rich deposits in Ethiopia. About the size of a small zebra, Eurygnathohippus woldegabrieli -- named for geologist Giday WoldeGabriel, who earned his Ph.D. at Case Western Reserve in 1987 -- had three-toed hooves and grazed the grasslands and shrubby woods in the Afar Region.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-534-7183
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 12-Dec-2013
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Environment drives genetics in 'Evolution Canyon'; discovery sheds light on climate change
Virginia Bioinformatics Institute researchers studying life from a unique natural environment in Israel discover heat stress seems to influence a species' genetic makeup, a finding that may influence understanding of climate change.
United States-Israel Binational Science Foundation

Contact: John Pastor
jdpastor@vt.edu
540-231-5646
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 12-Dec-2013
Science
Speeding up gene discovery
MIT researchers develop a new gene-editing system that enables large-scale studies of gene function.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute, Broad Institute, National Science Foundation, Klarman Cell Observatory, Simons Center, and others

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 11-Dec-2013
Nature
A new material for solar panels could make them cheaper, more efficient
A unique solar panel design made with a new ceramic material points the way to potentially providing sustainable power cheaper, more efficiently, and requiring less manufacturing time. It also reaches a four-decade-old goal of discovering a bulk photovoltaic material that can harness energy from visible and infrared light, not just ultraviolet light.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office, Energy Commercialization Institute

Contact: Tona Kunz
tkunz@anl.gov
630-252-5560
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 11-Dec-2013
Current Biology
Researchers at Penn show optimal framework for heartbeats
There is an optimal amount of strain that a beating heart can generate and still beat at its usual rate, once per second. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have now shown that this "sweet spot" depends on the stiffness of the collagen framework that the heart's cells live within.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Public Release: 11-Dec-2013
High-tech X-ray imaging technique to offer detailed look at engineered tissue
Mark Anastasio, Ph.D., has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to develop a new imaging system that will help biomedical engineers see what happens when engineered tissue is implanted in the body.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Neil Schoenherr
nschoenherr@wustl.edu
314-935-5235
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 11-Dec-2013
2013 AGU Fall Meeting
Arctic cyclones more common than previously thought
From 2000 to 2010, about 1,900 cyclones churned across the top of the world each year, leaving warm water and air in their wakes -- and melting sea ice in the Arctic Ocean. That's about 40 percent more than previously thought, according to a new analysis of these Arctic storms.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 11-Dec-2013
2013 AGU Fall Meeting
East Antarctica is sliding sideways
It's official: East Antarctica is pushing West Antarctica around. Now that West Antarctica is losing weight -- that is, billions of tons of ice per year -- its softer mantle rock is being nudged westward by the harder mantle beneath East Antarctica. This movement is important for understanding current ice loss on the continent, and predicting future ice loss.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 11-Dec-2013
2013 AGU Fall Meeting
Alpine glacier, unchanged for thousands of years, now melting
Less than 20 miles from the site where melting ice exposed the 5,000-year-old body of Ítzi the Iceman, scientists have discovered new and compelling evidence that the Italian Alps are warming at an unprecedented rate. Part of that evidence comes in the form of a single dried-out leaf from a larch tree that grew thousands of years ago.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Showing releases 501-525 out of 749.

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