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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 526-550 out of 843.

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Public Release: 13-Jul-2014
Nature Chemistry
Deep within spinach leaves, vibrations enhance efficiency of photosynthesis
Biophysics researchers at the University of Michigan have used short pulses of light to peer into the mechanics of photosynthesis and illuminate the role that molecule vibrations play in the energy conversion process that powers life on our planet.
Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, U-M Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion, Research Council of Lithuania

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Global Change Biology
Precipitation, not warming temperatures, may be key in bird adaptation to climate change
A new model analyzing how birds in western North America will respond to climate change suggests that for most species, regional warming is not as likely to influence population trends as will precipitation changes.
National Science Foundation, US Geological Survey

Contact: Matt Betts
matthew.betts@oregonstate.edu
541-737-3841
Oregon State University

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
MicroBooNE particle detector makes its move, with Yale's help
If you want to see neutrinos change flavors, you need a hefty detector. Yale University physicists and others at the Fermilab research facility in Illinois recently helped move a massive, 30-ton particle detector into a new building where it will be used to help scientists better understand the enigmatic particles known as neutrinos.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jim Shelton
james.shelton@yale.edu
203-432-3881
Yale University

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
PLOS Genetics
Scripps Florida scientists shed new light on nerve cell growth
In a new study, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have shed new light on the complex processes of nerve cell growth, showing that a particular protein plays a far more sophisticated role in neuron development than previously thought.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Eric Sauter
esauter@scripps.edu
267-337-3859
Scripps Research Institute

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America 2014 Annual Conference
Your next Angry Birds opponent could be a robot
With the help of a smart tablet and Angry Birds, children can now do something typically reserved for engineers and computer scientists: program a robot to learn new skills. The Georgia Institute of Technology project is designed to serve as a rehabilitation tool and to help kids with disabilities.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jason Maderer
maderer@gatech.edu
404-385-2966
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Biomedical Spectroscopy and Imaging
New technology reveals insights into mechanisms underlying amyloid diseases
Amyloid diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes, share the common trait that proteins aggregate into long fibers which then form plaques. Yet in vitro studies have found that neither the amylin monomer precursors nor the plaques themselves are very toxic. New evidence using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy has revealed an intermediate structure during the amylin aggregation pathway that may explain toxicity, opening a window for possible interventions.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Esther Mateike
e.mateike@iospress.nl
31-206-883-355
IOS Press

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
The Astrophysical Journal
Radio-burst discovery deepens astrophysics mystery
The discovery of a split-second burst of radio waves by scientists using the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico provides important new evidence of mysterious pulses that appear to come from deep in outer space.
European Research Council, National Science Foundation, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Fonds de recherche du Québec - Nature et technologies, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Contact: Chris Chipello
christopher.chipello@mcgill.ca
514-398-4201
McGill University

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Science
Scripps scientists discover evidence of super-fast deep earthquake
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have discovered the first evidence that deep earthquakes, those breaking at more than 400 kilometers (250 miles) below Earth's surface, can rupture much faster than ordinary earthquakes. The finding gives seismologists new clues about the forces behind deep earthquakes as well as fast-breaking earthquakes that strike near the surface.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 10-Jul-2014
Science
New research finds ocean's most abundant organisms have clear daily cycles
Researchers working at Station ALOHA, a deep ocean study site 100 km north of Oahu, observed different species of free-living, heterotrophic bacteria turning on diel cycling genes at slightly different times -- suggesting a wave of transcriptional activity that passes through the ocean microbial community each day.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Talia S. Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Nature
USF study: Amphibians can acquire resistance to deadly fungus
Emerging fungal pathogens pose a greater threat to biodiversity than any other parasitic group, causing population declines of amphibians, bats, corals, bees and snakes. New research from the University of South Florida published in the prestigious journal Nature reveals that amphibians can acquire behavioral or immunological resistance to a deadly chytrid fungus implicated in global amphibian population declines.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Vickie Chachere
vchachere@usf.edu
813-974-6251
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Nature
Biologists link sexual selection and placenta formation
Sexual selection enhances opportunities to mate, the tail of male peacocks being an iconic example. Biologists at the University of California, Riverside have found that sexual selection and 'placentation' -- the formation of a placenta -- are linked. Describing the life histories of more than 150 species of fish in the family Poeciliidae, the researchers found that species with placentas tend to have males that do not have bright coloration, ornamentation or courtship displays.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Geology
Shark teeth analysis provides detailed new look at Arctic climate change
A new study shows that some shark species may be able to cope with the rising salinity of Arctic waters that may come with rising temperatures.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Steve Koppes
skoppes@uchicago.edu
773-702-8366
University of Chicago

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Global Change Biology
For corals adapting to climate change, it's survival of the fattest -- and most flexible
The future health of the world's coral reefs and the animals that depend on them relies in part on the ability of one tiny symbiotic sea creature to get fat -- and to be flexible about the type of algae it cooperates with.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Pam Frost Gorder
gorder.1@osu.edu
614-292-9475
Ohio State University

Public Release: 9-Jul-2014
Nature
Human cells' protein factory has an alternate operating manual
Working with a gene involved in HIV infection, University of Maryland researchers discovered some human genes have an alternate set of operating instructions written into their protein-making machinery, which can quickly alter the proteins' contents, functions and ability to survive. The UMD study, published in Nature, is the first to demonstrate the phenomenon of programmed ribosomal frameshifting in a human gene. Frameshifting helps regulate the gene's immune response, the authors report.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Robinson
abbyr@umd.edu
301-405-5845
University of Maryland

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Solar energy gets a boost
A perspective article published recently by UC Riverside chemists in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters reviews the chemists' work on 'singlet fission' in which a single photon generates a pair of excited states.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Molecular Microbiology
When faced with some sugars, bacteria can be picky eaters
Researchers have found for the first time that genetically identical strains of bacteria can respond very differently to the presence of sugars and other organic molecules in the environment, with some individual bacteria devouring the sugars and others ignoring it.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
AAU launches STEM education initiative website, announces STEM network conference
The Association of American Universities (AAU), an association of leading public and private research universities, today launched the AAU STEM Initiative Hub, a website that will both support and widen the impact of the association's initiative to improve the quality of undergraduate teaching and learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields at its member institutions. AAU plans a reception/poster session on the initiative July 21.
Leona and Harry Helmsley Charitable Trust, National Science Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Contact: Barry Toiv
barry.toiv@aau.edu
202-408-7500
Association of American Universities

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Journal of the Botanical Research Institute of Texas
New plant species from the heart of Texas
Collectors found two specimens of the prickly plant in 1974 and 1990 in Texas. Then, for two decades, the 14 plant was identified wrongly as one species, then another, then a third. Now -- after a long search turned up a 'pathetic, wilted' third specimen -- a University of Utah botanist and colleagues identified the spiny plant as a new, possibly endangered species and named it 'from the heart' in Latin because it was found in Valentine, Texas.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 8-Jul-2014
Astrophysical Journal Letters
A hotspot for powerful cosmic rays
An observatory run by the University of Utah found a 'hotspot' beneath the Big Dipper emitting a disproportionate number of the highest-energy cosmic rays. The discovery moves physics another step toward identifying the mysterious sources of the most energetic particles in the universe.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
SAR11, oceans' most abundant organism, has ability to create methane
The oxygen-rich surface waters of the world's major oceans are supersaturated with methane -- a powerful greenhouse gas that is roughly 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide -- yet little is known about the source of this methane. A new study demonstrates the ability of some strains of the oceans' most abundant organism -- SAR11 -- to generate methane as a byproduct of breaking down a compound for its phosphorus.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Angel White
awhite@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-6397
Oregon State University

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Monthly Notices of Royal Astronomical Society
Small, but plentiful: How the faintest galaxies illuminated the early universe
Light from tiny galaxies over 13 billion years ago played a larger role than previously thought in creating the conditions in the universe as we know it today, a new study has found.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jason Maderer
maderer@gatech.edu
404-385-2966
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
European Journal of Neuroscience
Dodging dots helps explain brain circuitry
In a new study, Brown University neuroscientists looked cell-by-cell at the brain circuitry that tadpoles, and possibly other animals, use to avoid collisions. The study produced a model of how individual inhibitory and excitatory neurons can work together to control a simple behavior.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Fox Foundation

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Science Communication
Mind the gap: Socioeconomic status may influence understanding of science
When it comes to science, socioeconomic status may widen confidence gaps among the least and most educated groups in society, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Science, Media and the Public research group.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dietram Scheufele
scheufele@wisc.edu
608-262-1614
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Study reveals strong links between Antarctic climate, food web
A long-term study of the links between climate and marine life along the rapidly warming West Antarctic Peninsula reveals how changes in physical factors such as wind speed and sea-ice cover send ripples up the food chain, with impacts on everything from single-celled algae to penguins.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Malmquist
davem@vims.edu
804-684-7011
Virginia Institute of Marine Science

Public Release: 7-Jul-2014
Nature Physics
Penn researchers: Consider the 'anticrystal'
Physicists at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Chicago have evidence that a new concept should undergird our understanding of most materials: the anticrystal, a theoretical solid that is completely disordered.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Evan Lerner
elerner@upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania

Showing releases 526-550 out of 843.

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