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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 526-550 out of 828.

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Public Release: 30-Oct-2014
Science
Emerging disease could wipe out American, European salamanders
A fungal disease from Asia wiped out salamanders in parts of Europe and will likely reach the US through the international wildlife trade in Asian newts sold as pets, say US experts. In an Oct. 31 Science paper, an international team reports the fungus arose in Asia 30 million years ago and is lethal to many European and American newt species. It has not yet been found in North American wild amphibians.
Ghent University Special Research Fund, University of Maryland-Smithsonian Institution Seed Grant, Illinois Department of Natural Resources State Wildlife Grant, National Science Foundation.

Contact: Heather Dewar
hdewar@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Global Biogeochemical Cycles
Researchers track ammonium source in open ocean
To understand the extent to which human activities are polluting Earth's atmosphere and oceans, it's important to distinguish human-made pollutants from compounds that occur naturally. A new study finds that deposition of ammonium, a source of nitrogen pollution, over the open ocean comes mostly from natural marine sources, and not from human activity.
National Science Foundation, NOAA Climate and Global Change Fellowship Program

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Technology
New technology shows promise for delivery of therapeutics to the brain
The researchers from the Virginia Tech -- Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences described in their article in Technology published by the World Scientific Publishing Company that they have created 'a tool for blood-barrier-brain disruption that uses bursts of sub-microsecond bipolar pulses to enhance the transfer of large molecules to the brain.'
Golfers Against Cancer, Wake Forest School of Medicine, National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Nystrom
tansy@vt.edu
540-231-4371
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Advanced Functional Materials
Gentle caffeine boost for premature babies
Empa researchers have developed a UV-activated membrane which releases a gentle dose of medication to the skin of a patient. In future those who fear injections will be able to sleep soundly, as will premature babies too, since the new dosing technique will spare them additional stress.
Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Luciano F. Boesel
luciano.boesel@empa.ch
41-587-657-393
Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)

Public Release: 29-Oct-2014
Nature
New study shows 3 abrupt pulse of CO2 during last deglaciation
A new study shows that the rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide that contributed to the end of the last ice age more than 10,000 years ago did not occur gradually, but was characterized by three 'pulses' in which C02 rose abruptly.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Ed Brook
brooke@geo.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8197
Oregon State University

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Boulder team wins International Water Prize
A groundbreaking technological development has been recognized this month with one of the world's most prestigious awards for innovations related to water resources. The research team, including the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, has developed a way to use GPS to measure soil moisture, snow depth, and vegetation water content.
National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Contact: David Hosansky
hosansky@ucar.edu
303-497-8611
National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Taming internet complexity for a more responsive user experience
The key to the future success of the Internet rests squarely on understanding the complex interactions between content providers, content distribution networks and ISPs. and in inventing new architectural and algorithmic mechanisms to coordinate them better. But this is no easy task because the Internet consists of thousands of organizations that often act independently with minimal coordination.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
Nucleic Acids Research
Technique uses bacteria's own CRISPR-Cas system to turn off gene
Researchers have developed a technique that co-opts an immune system already present in bacteria and archaea to turn off specific genes or sets of genes -- creating a powerful tool for future research on genetics and related fields.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
UT Arlington School of Social Work receives grant to develop human assistive robot learning network
John Bricout, UT Arlington associate dean for research and community outreach in the School of Social Work, will use a federal grant to develop a human assistive robot learning network.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Bridget Lewis
blewis@uta.edu
817-272-3317
University of Texas at Arlington

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
University of Delaware study connects penguin chick weights to local weather conditions
Antarctica's Adélie penguins live in one of the most rapidly warming areas on Earth. A UD study connects chick weights to local weather.
NOAA-National Marine Fisheries Service, NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Donna O'Brien
dobrien@udel.edu
302-831-1418
University of Delaware

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Rice team sets sights on better voting machine
At the urging of county election officials in Austin, Texas, a group of Rice University engineers and social scientists has pulled together a team of US experts to head off a little-known yet looming crisis facing elections officials nationwide.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Journal of the American Chemical Society
'Sticky' ends start synthetic collagen growth
Researchers at Rice University detail how synthetic collagen helices self-assemble into fibers and gels. The discovery could lead to better synthetic materials for medical applications.
National Science Foundation, Robert A. Welch Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Conference Proceedings of the Transportation Research Board
Taxi GPS data helps researchers study Hurricane Sandy's effect on NYC traffic
The largest Atlantic hurricane on record, Hurricane Sandy, offered a chance for researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to try out a new computational method they developed that promises to help municipalities quantify the resilience of their transportation systems to extreme events using only GPS data from taxis.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dan Work
dbwork@illinois.edu
University of Illinois College of Engineering

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Medical Anthropology Quarterly
CWRU researcher finds training officers about mental illness benefits prison's safety
Case Western Reserve University mental health researcher Joseph Galanek spent a cumulative nine months in an Oregon maximum-security prison to learn first-hand how the prison manages inmates with mental illness. What he found, through 430 hours of prison observations and interviews, is that inmates were treated humanely and security was better managed when cell block officers were trained to identify symptoms of mental illness and how to respond to them.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

Contact: Susan Griffith
susan.griffith@case.edu
216-368-1004
Case Western Reserve University

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Nature
First time-lapse images of exploding fireball from a 'nova' star
A team of researchers including from the University of Sydney and Georgia State University have captured images of a thermonuclear fireball exploding from a star.
National Science Foundation, Georgia State University

Contact: Verity Leatherdale
verity.leatherdale@sydney.edu.au
61-242-529-6802
University of Sydney

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Cell membranes self-assemble
A self-driven reaction can assemble phospholipid membranes like those that enclose cells. The new process is specific and non-toxic, and can be used in the presence of biomolecules one might want to study within artificial cells. The technique could also be used to assemble packets for drug delivery.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, NIH/ational Institute of General Medical Sciences

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Viral switches share a shape
A hinge in the RNA genome of the virus that causes hepatitis C works like a switch that can be flipped to prevent it from replicating in infected cells. Scientists have discovered that this shape is shared by several other viruses -- among them one that kills cancer cells.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Susan Brown
sdbrown@ucsd.edu
858-246-0161
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Journal of Clinical Investigation
UCI scientists identify lesion-healing mechanism in psoriasis
A UC Irvine-led study has revealed the underlying genetic factors that help repair skin lesions caused by psoriasis, which could engender new methods of controlling the lingering condition.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Tom Vasich
tmvasich@uci.edu
949-824-6455
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
Breakthrough in molecular electronics paves the way for DNA-based computer circuits in the future
An international group of scientists reports reproducible and quantitative measurements of electricity flow through long molecules made of four DNA strands. These findings signal the most significant breakthrough towards the development of DNA-based electrical circuits in the last decade, paving an original way towards a new generation of computer circuits that can be more sophisticated, cheaper and simpler to make.
European Commission, European Science Foundation, Israel Science Foundation, Binational Science Foundation, Minerva Center for Bio-Hybrid Complex Systems, Hebrew University of Jerusalem/Institute for Advanced Studies, Italian Institute of Technology

Contact: Dov Smith
dovs@savion.huji.ac.il
972-258-82844
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature
Georgia State astronomers image the exploding fireball stage of a nova
Astronomers at Georgia State University's Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy have observed the expanding thermonuclear fireball from a nova that erupted last year in the constellation Delphinus with unprecedented clarity.
National Science Foundation

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 26-Oct-2014
Nature Photonics
Turning loss to gain: Cutting power could dramatically boost laser output
Re-examining longstanding beliefs about the physics of lasers, engineers have shown that carefully restricting the delivery of power to certain areas within a laser could boost its output by many orders of magnitude.
National Science Foundation, Defense Advance Research Projects Agency

Contact: Steven Schultz
sschultz@princeton.edu
609-258-3617
Princeton University, Engineering School

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Some like it loud
Species of poison frogs that utilize bright warning coloration as protection from predators are more likely to develop louder, more complex calls than relatives that rely on camouflage. New research indicates that because these visual cues establish certain species as unsavory prey, they are free to make noisy calls in plain sight and better attract possible mates.
National Science Foundation, National Evolutionary Synthesis Center

Contact: Nicole Duncan
nicole.duncan@nescent.org
919-668-7993
National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Object-oriented Programming, Systems, Languages and Applications (OOPSLA)
New 'Surveyman' software promises to revolutionize survey design and accuracy
Doctoral student Emma Tosch of University of Massachusetts Amherst School of Computer Science won a Best Paper award this week at the premier international computer programming language design conference in Portland, Ore., for her work on 'Surveyman,' a first-of-its-kind software system for designing, deploying and automatically debugging surveys to improve their accuracy and trustworthiness.
NSF

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 24-Oct-2014
Nature Geoscience
Icelandic volcano sits on massive magma hot spot
New research from University of California Davis and Aarhus University in Denmark shows that high mantle temperatures miles beneath the Earth's surface are essential for generating large amounts of magma. In fact, the scientists found that Iceland's Bardarbunga volcano lies directly above the hottest portion of the North Atlantic mantle plume.
National Science Foundation, Danish National Research Foundation

Contact: Charles Lesher
celesher@ucdavis.edu
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 23-Oct-2014
Biomacromolecules
NYU researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber
Researchers have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their work has taken place on the nanoscale. For the first time, this achievement has been realized on the microscale -- a leap of magnitude in size that presents significant new opportunities for using engineered protein fibers.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton
kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu
718-260-3792
New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering

Showing releases 526-550 out of 828.

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