National Science Foundation
Search NSF News:
NSF Main
NSF News
NSF Funded Research News
 
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 
At nsf.gov
Contacts Page
Multimedia Gallery
Media Advisories
Publications
Special Reports
Awards Search
Science & Engineering Stats
NSF & Congress
About NSF
RSS Feed RSS Feed
  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 551-575 out of 867.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 ]

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Science
Scientists apply biomedical technique to reveal changes within the body of the ocean
For decades, medical researchers have sought new methods to diagnose how different types of cells and systems in the body are functioning. Now scientists have adapted an emerging biomedical technique to study the vast body of the ocean.
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Media Relations Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Black History Bulletin
Students report greater learning gains in traditional science courses
Students taking traditional, in-class science courses reported higher perceived learning gains than students enrolled in online distance education science courses. Notably, African-American students taking traditional science courses self-reported greater affective and psychomotor learning gains than students taking online science courses.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lamont Flowers
lflower@clemson.edu
864-656-0315
Clemson University

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Tissue Engineering
A 'clear' choice for clearing 3-D cell cultures
Scientists have hailed recent demonstrations of chemical technologies for making animal tissues see-through, but a new study is the first to evaluate three such technologies side-by-side for use with engineered 3-D tissue cultures.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Brown Institute for Brain Science

Contact: David Orenstein
david_orenstein@brown.edu
401-863-1862
Brown University

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Nature
Study shows cellular RNA can template DNA repair in yeast
Scientists have shown that RNA produced within cells of a common budding yeast can serve as a template for repairing the most devastating DNA damage -- a break in both strands of a DNA helix.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Georgia Research Alliance

Contact: John Toon
jtoon@gatech.edu
404-894-6986
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 3-Sep-2014
Nature
Hawaii scientist maps, names Laniakea, our home supercluster of galaxies
An international team of astronomers has defined the contours of the immense supercluster of galaxies containing our own Milky Way. They have named the supercluster 'Laniakea,' meaning 'immense heaven' in Hawaiian.
National Science Foundation, Space Telescope Science Institute, Jet Propulsion Lab, NASA, Israel Science Foundation, Lyon Institute of Origins, Centre national de la recherche scientifique

Contact: Talia S Ogliore
togliore@hawaii.edu
808-956-4531
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Angewandte Chemie
Grooving crystal surfaces repel water
Researchers in Japan developed a porous polymer that stores and sorts organic molecules in the presence of water, which could have big implications for various industrial processes such as energy storage.
Advanced Catalytic Transformation Program for Carbon Utilization, Japan Science and Technology Agency, ENEOS Hydrogen Trust Fund

Contact: Peter Gee
pr@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp
075-753-9755
Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Psychological Science
Experiences make you happier than possessions -- Before and after
To get the most enjoyment out of our dollar, science tells us to focus our discretionary spending on experiences such as travel over material goods. A new Cornell University study shows that the enjoyment we derive from experiential purchases may begin even before we buy.
National Science Foundation, John Templeton Foundation

Contact: Melissa Osgood
mmo59@cornell.edu
607-255-2059
Cornell University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
New synthesis method may shape future of nanostructures, clean energy
A team of University of Maryland physicists has published new nanoscience advances that they and other scientists say make possible new nanostructures and nanotechnologies with huge potential applications ranging from clean energy and quantum computing advances to new sensor development.
Office of Naval Research, U.S. Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Research Corporation

Contact: Lee Tune
ltune@umd.edu
301-405-4679
University of Maryland

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
NSF renews grant for biological physics research at Rice
Rice University has received a five-year, $11.75 million grant from the National Science Foundation to support the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
CBE-Life Sciences Education
More than half of biology majors are women, yet gender gaps remain in science classrooms
STEM fields are heavily dominated by males, which is of concern to universities as they try to improve student retention and achievement. One exception is in the field of biology. Of undergraduate biology majors, more than 60 percent are female. A common assumption is the field of biology no longer faces gender inequalities. However, ASU and UofW researchers have proven otherwise. A large analysis of gender differences shows gender-based gaps in achievement and class participation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sandra Leander
sandra.leander@asu.edu
480-965-9865
Arizona State University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Researchers awarded $1.5 million to develop software to process solar astronomy data on larger scale
Researchers in Georgia State University's new Astroinformatics program have been awarded $1.5 million from the National Science Foundation to develop software tools that can process large sets of solar astronomy data and allow scientists to perform analyses on scales and detail levels that have not been possible.
National Science Foundation

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Surprising new role for calcium in sensing pain
When you accidentally touch a hot oven, you rapidly pull your hand away. Duke researchers have made a surprising discovery in worms about the role of calcium in such pain signaling. They have built a structural model of the molecule that allows calcium ions to pass into a neuron, triggering a signal of pain. These discoveries may help direct new strategies to treat pain in people.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Esther A. and Joseph Klingenstein Fund, Whitehall Foundation, Duke University

Contact: Karl Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
Nature Communications
Single laser stops molecular tumbling motion instantly
In the quantum world, making the simple atom behave is one thing, but making the more complex molecule behave is another story. Now Northwestern University scientists have figured out an elegant way to stop a molecule from tumbling so that its potential for new applications, such as quantum computing, can be harnessed: shine a single laser on a trapped molecule and it instantly cools to the temperature of outer space, stopping the rotation of the molecule.
US Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 2-Sep-2014
PeerJ
Researchers find Asian camel crickets now common in US homes
With their long, spiky legs and their propensity for eating anything, including each other, camel crickets are the stuff of nightmares. And now research from North Carolina State University finds that non-native camel cricket species have spread into homes across the eastern United States.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sierra Nevada freshwater runoff could drop 26 percent by 2100, UC study finds
Freshwater runoff from the Sierra Nevada may decrease by as much as one-quarter by 2100 due to climate warming on the high slopes, according to scientists at UC Irvine and UC Merced.
National Science Foundation, Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory, US Department of Energy

Contact: Laura Rico
lrico@uci.edu
949-824-9055
University of California - Irvine

Public Release: 1-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Engineers develop new sensor to detect tiny individual nanoparticles
A team of researchers at Washington University in St. Louis, led by Lan Yang, Ph.D., the Das Family Career Development Associate Professor in Electrical & Systems Engineering, and their collaborators at Tsinghua University in China have developed a new sensor that can detect and count nanoparticles, at sizes as small as 10 nanometers, one at a time. The researchers say the sensor could potentially detect much smaller particles, viruses and small molecules.
National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office

Contact: Julie Flory
Julie.Flory@WUSTL.EDU
314-935-5408
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Technology
Accounting for biological aggregation in heating and imaging of magnetic nanoparticles
We systematically characterize the effects of aggregation on both radiofrequency heating and magnetic resonance image (MRI) contrast of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, including detailed analysis of the aggregate morphologies based on quasi-fractal descriptions. While aggregation is shown to produce significant reductions in both heating and MRI contrast, we also present a new method to quantify and correlate these effects for clinical applications, such as cancer hyperthermia, utilizing sweep imaging with Fourier transform MRI.
University of Minnesota, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Philly Lim
mllim@wspc.com
656-466-5775
World Scientific

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Lancet Infectious Diseases
New tuberculosis blood test in children is reliable and highly specific
A new blood test provides a fast and accurate tool to diagnose tuberculosis in children, a new proof-of-concept study shows. The newly developed test is the first reliable immunodiagnostic assay to detect active tuberculosis in children. The test features excellent specificity, a similar sensitivity as culture tests in combination with speed of a blood test. The promising findings are a major advance for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in children, particularly in tuberculosis-endemic regions.
European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership, German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Klaus Reither
Klaus.Reither@unibas.ch
41-612-848-967
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature
Mixing in star-forming clouds explains why sibling stars look alike
The chemical uniformity of stars in the same cluster is the result of turbulent mixing in the clouds of gas where star formation occurs, according to a study by astrophysicists at UC Santa Cruz. Their results show that even stars that don't stay together in a cluster will share a chemical fingerprint with their siblings which can be used to trace them to the same birthplace.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Tim Stephens
stephens@ucsc.edu
831-459-2495
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature
Why sibling stars look alike: Early, fast mixing in star-birth clouds
Early, fast, turbulent mixing of gas within giant molecular clouds -- the birthplaces of stars -- means all stars formed from a single cloud bear the same unique chemical 'tag' or 'DNA fingerprint,' write astrophysicists at University of California, Santa Cruz, reporting on the results of computational simulations in the journal Nature, published online on Aug. 31, 2014. Could such chemical tags help astronomers identify our own Sun's long-lost sibling stars?
National Science Foundation, NASA, University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center

Contact: Mark Krumholz
mkrumhol@ucsc.edu
510-761-2929
University of California High-Performance AstroComputing Center

Public Release: 31-Aug-2014
Nature Chemistry
A new synthetic amino acid for an emerging class of drugs
EPFL scientists have developed a new amino acid that can be used to modify the 3-D structure of therapeutic peptides. Insertion of the amino acid into bioactive peptides enhanced their binding affinity up to 40-fold. Peptides with the new amino acid could potentially become a new class of therapeutics.
National Centre of Competence in Research Chemical Biology, Swiss National Science Foundation, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Contact: Nik Papageorgiou
n.papageorgiou@epfl.ch
41-216-932-105
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
CCNY team defines new biodiversity metric
To understand how the repeated climatic shifts over the last 120,000 years may have influenced today's patterns of genetic diversity, a team of researchers led by City College of New York biologist Dr. Ana Carnaval developed a new biodiversity metric called 'phylogeographic endemism.'
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jay Mwamba
jmwamba@ccny.cuny.edu
212-650-7580
City College of New York

Public Release: 29-Aug-2014
Personality and Social Psychology Review
Meaningful relationships can help you thrive
Deep and meaningful relationships play a vital role in overall well-being. A paper published in Personality and Social Psychology Review provides an important perspective on thriving through relationships, emphasizes two types of support that relationships provide, and illuminates aspects where further study is necessary.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Health and Human Services, Fetzer Institute

Contact: Jennifer Santisi
press@spsp.org
202-524-6543
Society for Personality and Social Psychology

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
Biology Letters
Flapping baby birds give clues to origin of flight
The origin of flight is a contentious issue: some argue that tree-climbing dinosaurs learned to fly in order to avoid hard falls. Others favor the story that theropod dinosaurs ran along the ground and pumped their forelimbs to gain lift, eventually talking off. New evidence showing the early development of aerial righting in birds, published by biologists Robert Dudley of UC Berkeley and Dennis Evangelista of the University of North Carolina, favors the tree-dweller hypothesis.
National Science Foundation, Sigma Xi

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 28-Aug-2014
IEEE International Symposium on Robot and Human Interactive Communication
Socially-assistive robots help kids with autism learn by providing personalized prompts
In a pilot study led by Maja Mataric at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, researchers found that children with autism spectrum disorders showed improved or maintained performance in learning imitative behavior by interacting with humanoid robots that provided graded cueing, an occupational therapy technique that shapes behavior by providing increasingly specific cues to help a person learn new skills.
NSF/Human-Centered Computing, NSF/CISE Research Infrastructure

Contact: Megan Hazle
hazle@usc.edu
213-821-1887
University of Southern California

Showing releases 551-575 out of 867.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 ]

  Highlights
Science360 Science360 News Service
Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Science360 News is an up-to-date view of breaking science news from around the world. We gather news from wherever science is happening, including directly from scientists, college and university press offices, popular and peer-reviewed journals, dozens of National Science Foundation science and engineering centers, and funding sources that include government agencies, not-for-profit organizations and private industry.
Charles Darwin Science for Everyone
Let NSF be your portal to the latest science and engineering news—in videos, images, podcasts, articles, features and more.
NAGC Winner - Jellyfish NSF Exclusive Special Reports
From the "Birth of the Internet" to "Jellyfish Gone Wild", these in-depth, Web-based reports explore the frontiers of science and engineering.