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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 576-600 out of 789.

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Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Taking the pulse of mountain formation in the Andes
Carmala Garzione, a professor of earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester, explains that the Altiplano plateau in the central Andes -- and most likely the entire mountain range -- was formed through a series of rapid growth spurts.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Iglinski
peter.iglinski@rochester.edu
585-273-4726
University of Rochester

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Psychological Science
People selectively remember the details of atrocities that absolve in-group members
Conversations about wartime atrocities often omit certain details. According to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, these omissions can lead people to have different memories for the event depending on social group membership.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ecology team improves understanding of valley-wide stream chemistry
Understanding the chemistry of streams at a finer scale could help to identify factors impairing water quality and help protect aquatic ecosystems.
National Science Foundation, A.W. Mellon Foundation

Contact: Kevin McGuire
kevin.mcguire@vt.edu
540-231-6017
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists successfully use krypton to accurately date ancient Antarctic ice
A team of scientists has successfully identified the age of 120,000-year-old Antarctic ice using radiometric krypton dating -- a new technique that may allow them to locate and date ice that is more than a million years old. This will allow them to reconstruct the climate much farther back into Earth's history and potentially understand the mechanisms that have triggered the planet to shift into and out of ice ages.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Christo Buizert
buizertc@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1209
Oregon State University

Public Release: 20-Apr-2014
Nature Biotechnology
Computational method dramatically speeds up estimates of gene expression
With gene expression analysis growing in importance for both basic researchers and medical practitioners, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Maryland have developed a new computational method that dramatically speeds up estimates of gene activity from RNA sequencing data.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
More questions than answers as mystery of domestication deepens
A recent interdisciplinary conference that led to the publication of a special issue of PNAS on domestication raised more questions than it answered. Washington University in St. Louis scientists Fiona Marshall and Ken Olsen, who participated in the conference and contributed to the special issue, discuss some of the key questions that have been raised about this pivotal event in human history.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
'Exotic' material is like a switch when super thin
Researchers from Cornell University and Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown how to switch a particular transition metal oxide, a lanthanum nickelate, from a metal to an insulator by making the material less than a nanometer thick.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Chickens to chili peppers
Suddenly there was a word for chili peppers. Information about archaeological remains of ancient chili peppers in Mexico along with a study of the appearance of words for chili peppers in ancient dialects helped researchers to understand where jalapenos were domesticated. Special issue of PNAS on plant and animal domestication.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
202-633-4700 x28216
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Study recalculates costs of combination vaccines
One of the most popular vaccine brands for children may not be the most cost-effective choice. And doctors may be overlooking some cost factors when choosing vaccines, driving the market toward what is actually a more expensive option, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Advanced Materials
Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur
A new chemical process can transform waste sulfur into lightweight plastic lenses that have a high refractive index and are transparent to mid-range infrared light. The lenses may have applications in thermal imaging devices. Other potential applications for the new plastic include sulfur-lithium batteries.
American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Foundation, National Science Foundation, National Research Foundation of Korea, Korean Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, State of Arizona TRIF Funding, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Drought and fire in the Amazon lead to sharp increases in forest tree mortality
Ongoing deforestation and fragmentation of forests in the Amazon help create tinderbox conditions for wildfires in remnant forests, contributing to rapid and widespread forest loss during drought years, according to a team of researchers.
National Science Foundation, NASA, Packard Foundation, Max Planck Institute of Biogeochemistry

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
East African honeybees are safe from invasive pests… for now
Several parasites and pathogens that devastate honeybees in Europe, Asia and the United States are spreading across East Africa, but do not appear to be impacting native honeybee populations at this time, according to an international team of researchers.
US Department of Agriculture, National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The story of animal domestication retold
A review of recent research on the domestication of large herbivores for 'The Modern View of Domestication,' a special feature of PNAS, suggests that neither intentional breeding nor genetic isolation were as significant as traditionally thought.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetic study tackles mystery of slow plant domestications
Did domesticating a plant typically take a few hundred or many thousands of years? Genetic studies often indicate that domestication traits have a fairly simple genetic basis, which should facilitate their rapid evolution under selection. On the other hand, recent archeological studies of crop domestication have suggested a relatively slow spread and fixation of domestication traits. An article in 'The Modern View of Domestication,' a special issue of PNAS, tries to resolve the discrepancy.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
Science: There's something ancient in the icebox
Scientists were greatly surprised to discover an ancient tundra landscape preserved under the Greenland Ice Sheet, below two miles of ice. This finding, led by geologists at the University of Vermont, provides strong evidence that the ice sheet has persisted much longer than previously known, enduring through many past periods of global warming.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Stanford biologists help solve fungal mysteries
A new genetic analysis revealing the previously unknown biodiversity and distribution of thousands of fungi in North America might also reveal a previously underappreciated contributor to climate change.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Bjorn Carey, Stanford News Service
bccarey@stanford.edu
650-725-1944
Stanford University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Geology
Dartmouth-led study shows air temperature influenced African glacial movements
Changes in air temperature, not precipitation, drove the expansion and contraction of glaciers in Africa's Rwenzori Mountains at the height of the last ice age, according to a Dartmouth-led study funded by the National Geographic Society and the National Science Foundation.
National Geographic Society, National Science Foundation

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Nature
Progress in the fight against quantum dissipation
Scientists at Yale have confirmed a 50-year-old, previously untested theoretical prediction in physics and improved the energy storage time of a quantum switch by several orders of magnitude. They report their results in the April 17 issue of the journal Nature.
National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, European Union, Yale

Contact: Eric Gershon
eric.gershon@yale.edu
203-432-8555
Yale University

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Scientists achieve first direct observations of excitons in motion
Technique developed at MIT reveals the motion of energy-carrying quasiparticles in solid material.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Apr-2014
Nature Communications
Warm US West, cold East: A 4,000-year pattern
Last winter's curvy jet stream pattern brought mild temperatures to western North America and harsh cold to the East. A University of Utah-led study shows that pattern became more pronounced 4,000 years ago, and suggests it may worsen as Earth's climate warms.
National Science Foundation, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and others

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
eLife
Drought hormones measured
Floods and droughts are increasingly in the news, and climate experts say their frequency will only go up in the future. As such, it is crucial for scientists to learn more about how these extreme events affect plants in order to prepare for and combat the risks to food security that could result. New work from Carnegie could help bring about breakthrough findings on that front.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Wolf Frommer
wfrommer@carnegiescience.edu
650-325-1521 x208
Carnegie Institution

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
eLife
Biologists develop nanosensors to visualize movements and distribution of plant hormone
Biologists at UC San Diego have succeeded in visualizing the movement within plants of a key hormone responsible for growth and resistance to drought. The achievement will allow researchers to conduct further studies to determine how the hormone helps plants respond to drought and other environmental stresses driven by the continuing increase in the atmosphere's carbon dioxide, or CO2, concentration.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Department of Energy

Contact: Kim McDonald
kmcdonald@ucsd.edu
858-534-7572
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Race and Justice
More should be done for female parolees
As the female prison population grows, a new study funded partly by the National Science Foundation says more should be done to help women probationers and parolees in poor urban areas remain crime-free.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
International Symposium on Nanoscience and Nanomaterials
Engineers develop new materials for hydrogen storage
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have created new ceramic materials that could be used to store hydrogen safely and efficiently. The researchers have created for the first time compounds made from mixtures of calcium hexaboride, strontium and barium hexaboride. They also have demonstrated that the compounds could be manufactured using a simple, low-cost manufacturing method known as combustion synthesis.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Ioana Patringenaru
ipatrin@ucsd.edu
858-822-0899
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 15-Apr-2014
Journal of Research in Personality
Outgoing behavior makes for happier humans
Happy is as happy does, apparently -- for human beings all over the world. Not only does acting extroverted lead to more positive feelings across several cultures, but people also report more upbeat behavior when they feel free to be themselves.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Timothy Church
church@wsu.edu
509-335-0927
Washington State University

Showing releases 576-600 out of 789.

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