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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 601-625 out of 827.

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Public Release: 26-Feb-2015
Science
Embrace unknowns, opt for flexibility in environmental policies
Two University of Washington researchers argue in a Science perspectives piece that conservation managers must learn to make decisions about managing ecosystems and natural resources based on an uncertain future.
National Science Foundation, University of Washington

Contact: Michelle Ma
mcma@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Molecular feedback loop gives clues to how flowers drop their petals
As Valentine's Day fades into the past, you may be noticing a surfeit of petals accumulate around your vase of flowers. A new study from the University of Missouri sheds new light on the process that governs how and when plants shed their petals, a process known as abscission. The findings are reported this week in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Melody Kroll
krollmm@missouri.edu
573-884-4144
University of Missouri-Columbia

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Nano Letters
Warming up the world of superconductors
Clusters of atoms known as 'superatoms' represent an entirely new family of superconductors -- one that appears to work at temperatures well above standard superconductors.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Perkins
perkinsr@usc.edu
213-740-9226
University of Southern California

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Physics Review Letters
UCLA physicists offer a solution to the puzzle of the origin of matter in the universe
Most of the laws of nature treat particles and antiparticles equally, but stars and planets are made of particles, or matter, and not antiparticles, or antimatter. That asymmetry, which favors matter to a very small degree, has puzzled scientists for many years. UCLA physicists offer a possible solution to the mystery of the origin of matter in the universe.
US Department of Energy, World Premier International Research Center Initiative, National Science Foundation

Contact: Stuart Wolpert
swolpert@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0511
University of California - Los Angeles

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Environmental Science Water Research & Technology
New technology could make treatment of oil and gas wastewater simpler, cheaper
Oil and gas operations in the United States produce about 21 billion barrels of wastewater per year. The saltiness of the water and the organic contaminants it contains have traditionally made treatment difficult and expensive.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Casey Forrestal
Casey.Forrestal@colorado.edu
303-735-0528
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
NSF grant to impact understanding of vesicle transport system of cells
Wayne State University's Takeshi Sakamoto, biophysicist and assistant professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, has been awarded the National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award, the agency's most prestigious award for up-and-coming researchers in science and engineering.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Nature
Monster black hole discovered at cosmic dawn
The discovery of the brightest quasar in the early universe, powered by the most massive black hole yet known at that time presents a puzzle to researchers: How could something so massive and luminous form so early in the universe, only 900 million years after the Big Bang?
Natural Science Foundation of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, National KeyBasic Research Program of China, National Science Foundation, People's Government of Yunnan Province, National Astronomical Observatories,

Contact: Daniel Stolte
stolte@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4402
University of Arizona

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
BioScience
Isolated wetlands have significant impact on water quality
Geographically isolated wetlands play an outsized role in providing clean water and other environmental benefits even though they may lack the regulatory protections of other wetlands, according to an article by Indiana University researchers and colleagues.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Steve Hinnefeld
slhinnef@iu.edu
812-856-3488
Indiana University

Public Release: 25-Feb-2015
Angewandte Chemie
In quest for better lithium-air batteries, chemists boost carbon's stability
Chemists Dunwei Wang, of Boston College, and Wei Fan, of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, report nano-coatings increased the stability of a unique form of carbon, yielding performance gains focused on next generation lithium-air batteries.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Ed Hayward
ed.hayward@bc.edu
617-552-4826
Boston College

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research
Geysers have loops in their plumbing
University of California Berkeley volcanologist Michael Manga and his students threaded sensors and cameras into the superheated water of geysers in Chile and Yellowstone, and have come up with an explanation for why geysers erupt periodically. They've even built a laboratory geyser that erupts every 20 minutes to prove that loops and bends in the underground plumbing trap steam bubbles that slowly leak out, heating the water above until it suddenly boils from the top down.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
ChemSusChem
Novel pretreatment could cut biofuel costs by 30 percent or more
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have invented a novel pretreatment technology that could cut the cost of biofuels production by about 30 percent or more by dramatically reducing the amount of enzymes needed to breakdown the raw materials that form biofuels.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Royal Society Interface
Easy on the eyes: How eyelash length keeps your eyes healthy
Georgia Tech study finds that the optimal eyelash length is one-third the width of the eye for humans and 21 other mammals. Anything shorter or longer increases airflow around the eye and leads to more dust hitting the surface.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jason Maderer
maderer@gatech.edu
404-385-2966
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Physical Review Letters
Ultra-thin nanowires can trap electron 'twisters' that disrupt superconductors
Superconductor materials carry electric current without resistance, but this valuable trait can be crippled by tiny tornado-like formations of electrons called vortices. To keep supercurrents flowing, scientists have figured out how to constrain troublesome vortices by trapping them within extremely short, ultra-thin nanowires.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Phil Sneiderman
prs@jhu.edu
443-997-9907
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Nature Genetics
Key genes for symbiosis between mycorrhiza fungi and trees evolved several times
The life style of ectomycorrhiza fungi is some 100 million years younger than the one of their ancestors within white and brown rot fungi. The key genome adaptation enabling fungi to associate to roots for establishing a symbiosis evolved a repeatedly amount of time. This conclusion was drawn by an international team of researchers who performed the first comprehensive comparative phylogenomic analysis on mycorrhiza fungi, now appearing in the reputed scientific journal Nature Genetics.
Joint Genome Institute, DOE/Genomic Science Program, Laboratory of Excellence ARBRE, Lorraine Region Council, National Science Foundation, German Science Foundation, and others

Contact: Tilo Arnhold
presse@ufz.de
49-341-235-1635
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

Public Release: 24-Feb-2015
Biology Letters
Boy or girl? Lemur scents have the answer
Dozens of pregnancy myths claim to predict whether a mom-to-be is carrying a boy or a girl. Some say you can tell by the shape of a woman's bump, or whether she craves salty or sweet. Even ultrasound doesn't always get it right. But for lemurs, the answer is in the mother's scent.
National Science Foundation, National Evolutionary Synthesis Center, University of California -- Berkeley, Research Council of Norway

Contact: Robin Ann Smith
ras10@duke.edu
919-681-8057
Duke University

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
USF biologists: Reductions in biodiversity can elevate disease risk
Using a combination of experiments, field studies, and mathematical models, University of South Florida biologists and colleagues from four other universities show that having an abundance and diversity of predators -- such as dragonflies, damselflies, and aquatic bugs -- to eat parasites is good for the health of amphibians, a group of animals experiencing worldwide population declines.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Agriculture, US Environmental Protection Agency

Contact: Jason Rohr
jasonrohr@gmail.com
813-974-0156
University of South Florida (USF Health)

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Small predator diversity is an important part of a healthy ecosystem
Biodiversity, including small predators such as dragonflies and other aquatic bugs that attack and consume parasites, may improve the health of amphibians, according to a team of researchers. Amphibians have experienced marked declines in the wild around the world in recent decades, the team added.
US Department of Agriculture, US Environmental Protection Agency, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Matt Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Evolution
Long-term nitrogen fertilizer use disrupts plant-microbe mutualisms
When exposed to nitrogen fertilizer over a period of years, nitrogen-fixing bacteria called rhizobia evolve to become less beneficial to legumes -- the plants they normally serve, researchers report in a new study.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Yates
diya@illinois.edu
217-333-5802
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Molecular Biology and Evolution
Carnivorous plant packs big wonders into tiny genome
Great, wonderful, wacky things can come in small genomic packages. That's one lesson to be learned from the carnivorous bladderwort, a plant whose tiny genome turns out to be a jewel box full of evolutionary treasures. A new study in the scientific journal Molecular Biology and Evolution breaks down the plant's genetic makeup, and finds a fascinating story.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Charlotte Hsu
chsu22@buffalo.edu
716-645-4655
University at Buffalo

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Communications
Epigenome orchestrates embryonic development
Studying zebrafish embryos, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that the epigenome plays a significant part in guiding development in the first 24 hours after fertilization. The research, which appears in the journal Nature Communications, may deepen understanding of congenital defects and miscarriage.
Washington University McDonnell International Scholars Program, Kwanjeong Educational Foundation, National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse, March of Dimes Foundation, American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait
straitj@wustl.edu
314-286-0141
Washington University School of Medicine

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
University of Tennessee professor receives prestigious award for ocean science work
Karen Lloyd's work with subsea floor mud and frozen Siberian soil has earned her an extraordinarily competitive award. The assistant professor of microbiology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, has been selected as a 2015 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Ocean Sciences.
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Amy Blakely
ablakely@utk.edu
865-974-5034
University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Via laser into the past of the oceans
Using cutting edge technologies experts of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel together with colleagues from the UK, Canada and the United States were able to reconstruct pH values of the Northern Pacific with a high resolution since the end of the 19th century. The study, which has been published in the current issue of the international journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reveals a clear acidification trend, but also strong seasonal fluctuations.
Federal Ministry of Education and Sciences of Germany-BIOACID, National Science and engineering Resource Council, Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jan Steffen
presse@geomar.de
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Climate Change
Study outlines threat of ocean acidification to coastal communities in US
Coastal communities in 15 states that depend on the $1 billion shelled mollusk industry (primarily oysters and clams) are at long-term economic risk from the increasing threat of ocean acidification, a new report concludes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: George Waldbusser
waldbuss@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-8964
Oregon State University

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature Geoscience
Reconstructing topsy-turvy paleoclimate of western US 21,000 years ago
Researchers have created the first comprehensive map of the topsy-turvy climate in the western US, 21,000 years ago when Southwest was wet and the Northwest was dry and are using it to test and improve the global climate models that have been developed to predict how precipitation patterns will change in the future.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David F. Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 23-Feb-2015
Nature
Simulating superconducting materials with ultracold atoms
Rice University physicist Randy Hulet and his collaborators have used ultracold lithium atoms to create a state of matter that may help solve some of the mysteries of high-temperature superconductivity. Their results are described this week in the journal Nature.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, National Science Foundation, Robert Welch Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Showing releases 601-625 out of 827.

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