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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

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Showing releases 601-625 out of 840.

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Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
New Phytologist
Clemson scientists: Kudzu can release soil carbon, accelerate global warming
Clemson University scientists are shedding new light on how invasion by exotic plant species affects the ability of soil to store greenhouse gases. The research could have far-reaching implications for how we manage agricultural land and native ecosystems.
US Department of Agriculture, National Science Foundation

Contact: Nishanth Tharayil
ntharay@clemson.edu
864-656-4453
Clemson University

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
10th US National Conference on Earthquake Engineering (10NCEE)
New bridge design improves earthquake resistance, reduces damage and speeds construction
Researchers have developed a new design for the framework of columns and beams that support bridges, called 'bents,' to improve performance for better resistance to earthquakes, less damage and faster on-site construction.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
New Wayne State research to improve energy efficiency and lessen environmental pollutants
A Wayne State University professor has been awarded a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Award, the agency's most prestigious award for up-and-coming researchers in science and engineering. The five-year, nearly $406,000 grant was awarded to Eranda Nikolla, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemical engineering in the College of Engineering, for the project 'Tailoring the nature of the active site of Ni electrocatalysts for electrochemical co-reduction of CO2 and H2O'.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Muscle-powered bio-bots walk on command
A new generation of miniature biological robots is flexing its muscle. Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign demonstrated a class of walking 'bio-bots' powered by muscle cells and controlled with electrical pulses, giving researchers unprecedented command over their function.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 1-Jul-2014
Nature Communications
Tags reveal Chilean devil rays are among ocean's deepest divers
Thought to dwell mostly near the ocean's surface, Chilean devil rays (Mobula tarapacana) are most often seen gliding through shallow, warm waters. But a new study by scientists at WHOI and international colleagues reveals that these large and majestic creatures are actually among the deepest-diving ocean animals.
National Science Foundation, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Harrison Foundation, Portuguese Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Nature Methods
Using geometry, researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to organize themselves
By confining colonies of human embryonic stem cells to tiny circular patterns on glass plates, researchers have for the first time coaxed them into organizing themselves just as they would under natural conditions.
New York Stem Cell Foundation, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Human Frontier Science Program

Contact: Zach Veilleux
zveilleux@rockefeller.edu
212-327-8982
Rockefeller University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Geology
New study: Ancient Arctic sharks tolerated brackish water 50 million years ago
Sharks were a tolerant bunch some 50 million years ago, cruising an Arctic Ocean that contained about the same percentage of freshwater as Louisiana's Lake Ponchatrain does today, says a new study involving the University of Colorado Boulder and the University of Chicago.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jaelyn Eberle
jaelyn.eberle@colorado.edu
303-919-6914
University of Colorado at Boulder

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Journal of Computational Physics
19th century math tactic gets a makeover -- and yields answers up to 200 times faster
A relic from long before the age of supercomputers, the 169-year-old math strategy called the Jacobi iterative method is widely dismissed today as too slow to be useful. But thanks to a curious, numbers-savvy Johns Hopkins engineering student and his professor, it may soon get a new lease on life.
National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Phil Sneiderman
prs@jhu.edu
443-997-9907
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 30-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
WSU researchers chart an ancient baby boom
Washington State University researchers have sketched out one of the greatest baby booms in North American history, a centuries-long 'growth blip' among southwestern Native Americans between 500 to 1300 A.D. It was a time when the early features of civilization -- including farming and food storage -- had matured to where birth rates likely 'exceeded the highest in the world today,' the researchers write in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Tim Kohler
tako@wsu.edu
509-335-2698
Washington State University

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Neuroscience
Noninvasive brain control
MIT engineers have now developed the first light-sensitive molecule that enables neurons to be silenced noninvasively, using a light source outside the skull.
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Human Frontiers Science Program, IET A. F. Harvey Prize, MIT McGovern Institute, New York Stem Cell Foundation, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Wallace H. Coulter Foundation, others

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Climate Change
Study finds Emperor penguin in peril
An international team of scientists studying Emperor penguin populations across Antarctica finds the iconic animals in danger of dramatic declines by the end of the century due to climate change. Their study, published today in Nature Climate Change, finds the Emperor penguin 'fully deserving of endangered status due to climate change.'
CIRES Visiting fellowships, WHOI Unrestricted funds, Grayce B. Kerr Fund, National Science Foundation

Contact: WHOI Media Office
media@whoi.edu
508-289-3340
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Photonics
Single-pixel 'multiplex' captures elusive terahertz images
In an effort that advances attempts to generate images using terahertz light waves, researchers from Boston College, Duke University and the University of New Mexico report in Nature Photonics that they've developing a single-pixel 'multiplex' device that uses boutique metamaterials to capture images in the terahertz realm, which scientists say could play a crucial role in future medical and security imaging initiatives.
Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation, DOE/Sandia National Laboratories

Contact: Ed Hayward
ed.hayward@bc.edu
617-552-4826
Boston College

Public Release: 29-Jun-2014
Nature Chemical Biology
Marine bacteria are natural source of chemical fire retardants
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a widely distributed group of marine bacteria that produce compounds nearly identical to toxic man-made fire retardants.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Contact: Scott LaFee
slafee@ucsd.edu
619-543-6163
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition
Monkeys also believe in winning streaks, study shows
Humans have a well-documented tendency to see winning and losing streaks in situations that, in fact, are random. But scientists disagree about whether the 'hot-hand bias' is a cultural artifact picked up in childhood or a predisposition deeply ingrained in the structure of our cognitive architecture.
National Science Foundation, Brain and Behavioral Research Foundation

Contact: Susan Hagen
susan.hagen@rochester.edu
585-276-4061
University of Rochester

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Genome Biology
Scientists identify new pathogenic and protective microbes associated with severe diarrhea
Diarrhea is a major cause of childhood mortality in developing countries and ranks as one of the top four causes of death among young children in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. In a finding that may one day help control diarrhea, researchers have identified microorganisms that may trigger diarrheal disease and others that may protect against it. These microbes were not widely linked to the condition previously. The research results appear today in Genome Biology.
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, National Science Foundation, National Insitututes of Health, The Wellcome Trust

Contact: Tom Ventsias
tomvent@umiacs.umd.edu
301-405-5933
University of Maryland

Public Release: 27-Jun-2014
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Are conservatives more obedient and agreeable than their liberal counterparts?
Why do conservatives appear to have an affinity for obeying leadership? And why do conservatives perceive greater consensus among politically like-minded others? Two studies publishing in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin shed light on these questions.
National Science Foundation, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

Contact: Jennifer Santisi
press@spsp.org
202-524-6543
Society for Personality and Social Psychology

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Nano Letters
Let there be light: Chemists develop magnetically responsive liquid crystals
University of California, Riverside chemists have constructed liquid crystals with optical properties that can be instantly and reversibly controlled by an external magnetic field. The research opens the door to display applications relying on the instantaneous and contactless nature of magnetic manipulation -- such as signage, posters, writing tablets, and billboards. Requiring no electrodes, the liquid crystals have applications in anti-counterfeit technology and optical communication devices for controlling the amplitude, phase, polarization, propagation direction of light.
National Science Foundation, US Army Research Laboratory

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Science
Sequencing electric eel genome unlocks shocking secrets
For the first time, the genome of the electric eel has been sequenced. This discovery has revealed the secret of how fishes with electric organs have evolved six times in the history of life to produce electricity outside of their bodies.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
Controlling movement with light
MIT neuroscientists inhibit muscle contractions by shining light on spinal cord neurons.
Human Frontier Science Program, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Science
Ancient ocean currents may have changed pacing and intensity of ice ages
In a new study in Science, researchers find that the deep ocean currents that move heat around the globe stalled or even stopped about 950,000 years ago, possibly due to expanding ice cover in the north. The slowing currents increased carbon dioxide storage in the ocean, leaving less in the atmosphere, which kept temperatures cold and kicked the climate system into a new phase of colder but less frequent ice ages, they hypothesize.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Martineau
kmartine@ldeo.columbia.edu
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 26-Jun-2014
Science
Scientists find the shocking truth about electric fish
Scientists have found how the electric fish evolved its jolt. Writing June 27, 2014, in the journal Science, a team of researchers led by Michael Sussman of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Harold Zakon of the University of Texas at Austin and Manoj Samanta of the Systemix Institute in Redmond, Wash., identifies the regulatory molecules involved in the genetic and developmental pathways that electric fish have used to convert a simple muscle into an organ capable of generating a potent electrical field.
National Science Foundation, W. M. Keck Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Michael Sussman
msussman@wisc.edu
608-262-8608
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
New technology to treat sepsis, a global killer
Engineers are developing a new technology that they believe could revolutionize the treatment and prevention of sepsis. This 'hidden killer' in the United States actually kills more people every year than AIDS, prostate cancer and breast cancer combined.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Adam Higgins
adam.higgins@oregonstate.edu
541-737-6245
Oregon State University

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Advanced Materials
Carbon-fiber epoxy honeycombs mimic the material performance of balsa wood
Materials scientists at Harvard SEAS have developed cellular composite materials of unprecedented light weight and stiffness.
BASF, National Science Foundation

Contact: Paul Karoff
karoff@seas.harvard.edu
617-496-0450
Harvard University

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Biological Chemistry
UMN research uncovers structure, protein elements critical to human function and disease
New structures discovered within cilia show a relationship between certain proteins and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. The discovery, made at the University of Minnesota, was named paper of the week in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, and sheds new light on the microstructure of cilia.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Characterization Facility, UMN

Contact: Caroline Marin
crmarin@umn.edu
612-624-5680
University of Minnesota Academic Health Center

Public Release: 25-Jun-2014
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Stanley Miller's forgotten experiments, analyzed
Stanley Miller, the chemist whose landmark experiment published in 1953 showed how some of the molecules of life could have formed on a young Earth, left behind boxes of experimental samples that he never analyzed. The first-ever analysis of some of Miller's old samples has revealed another way that important molecules could have formed on early Earth.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Showing releases 601-625 out of 840.

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