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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 626-650 out of 812.

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Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Most of Earth's carbon may be hidden in the planet's inner core, new model suggests
As much as two-thirds of Earth's carbon may be hidden in the inner core, making it the planet's largest carbon reservoir, according to a new model that even its backers acknowledge is 'provocative and speculative'.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Crosby Award from the U-M ADVANCE program, U-M's Associate Professor Support Fund

Contact: Jim Erickson
ericksn@umich.edu
734-647-1842
University of Michigan

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
GSA Today
UW team explores large, restless volcanic field in Chile
For seven years, an area larger than the city of Madison has been rising by 10 inches per year. That rapid rise provides a major scientific opportunity: to explore a mega-volcano before it erupts. That effort, and the hazard posed by the restless magma reservoir beneath Laguna del Maule, are described in a major research article in the December issue of GSA Today.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brad Singer
bsinger@geology.wisc.edu
608-265-8650
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Neuroscience 2014
Minute movements of autistic children and parents provide clue to severity of disorder
Imperceptible variations in movement patterns among individuals with autism spectrum disorder are important indicators of the severity of the disorder in children and adults, according to a report presented at the 2014 Society for Neuroscience annual meeting.
National Science Foundation, New Jersey Governor's Council for Medical Research and Treatment of Autism

Contact: Mary Hardin
mhardin@iu.edu
317-274-5456
Indiana University

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Widely used osteoporosis drugs may prevent breast, lung and colon cancers
The most commonly used medications for osteoporosis worldwide, bisphosphonates, may also prevent certain kinds of lung, breast and colon cancers.
National Institutes of Health, Italian Space Agency, National Science Foundation of China, National Center for Advancing Translational Science/Mount Sinai School of Medicine's Clinical and Translational Science Award

Contact: Renatt Brodsky
renatt.brodsky@mountsinai.org
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Public Release: 1-Dec-2014
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology
NYU researchers find silver lining playbook for performance
If we believe a negative trait we possess is linked to a related positive characteristic, we will be more productive in that domain, NYU researchers have found. Their study establishes a novel 'silver lining theory': negative attributes can produce positive results.
National Science Foundation, German Research Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 27-Nov-2014
Science
Another human footprint in the ocean
Human-induced changes to Earth's carbon cycle -- for example, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and ocean acidification -- have been observed for decades. However, a study published this week in Science showed human activities, in particular industrial and agricultural processes, have also had significant impacts on the upper ocean nitrogen cycle.
Korean National Research Foundation of Ministry of Science, National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
University of Minnesota engineers make sound loud enough to bend light on a computer chip
University of Minnesota engineering researchers have developed a chip on which both sound wave and light wave are generated and confined together so that the sound can very efficiently control the light.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Rhonda Zurn
rzurn@umn.edu
612-624-5551
University of Minnesota

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
Nature
Shaping the future of energy storage with conductive clay
Materials scientists from Drexel University's College of Engineering invented the clay, which is both highly conductive and can easily be molded into a variety of shapes and sizes. It represents a turn away from the rather complicated and costly processing -- currently used to make materials for lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors -- and toward one that looks a bit like rolling out cookie dough with results that are even sweeter from an energy storage standpoint.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Britt Faulstick
bef29@drexel.edu
215-895-2617
Drexel University

Public Release: 26-Nov-2014
PLOS ONE
Carnegie Mellon researchers identify brain regions that encode words, grammar, story
Carnegie Mellon University scientists have produced the first integrated computational model of reading, identifying which parts of the brain are responsible for such sub-processes as parsing sentences, determining the meaning of words and understanding relationships between characters. They based their results on brain scan of people reading a Harry Potter book.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Physicists bind single-atom sheets with the same force geckos use to climb walls
The approach is to design synergistic materials by combining two single-atom thick sheets, for example, that act as a photovoltaic cell as well as a light-emitting diode, converting energy between electricity and radiation.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
brendan@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Nature Communications
Blu-ray disc can be used to improve solar cell performance
Who knew about Blu-ray discs? One of the best ways to store high-definition movies and television shows because of their high-density data storage, Blu-ray discs also improve the performance of solar cells, according to a new Northwestern University study. Researchers have discovered that the pattern of information written on a Blu-ray disc -- and it doesn't matter if it's Jackie Chan's 'Supercop' or the cartoon 'Family Guy' -- works very well for improving light absorption across the solar spectrum.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Public Release: 25-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
Female color perception affects evolution of male plumage in birds
The expression of a gene involved in female birds' color vision is linked to the evolution of colorful plumage in males, reports a new study from the University of Chicago. The findings, published Nov. 26 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, confirm the essential role of female color perception in mate selection and sexual dimorphism.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kevin Jiang
kevin.jiang@uchospitals.edu
773-795-5227
University of Chicago Medical Center

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Marine Ecology Progress Series
CT scans of coral skeletons reveal ocean acidity increases reef erosion
For coral reefs to persist, rates of reef construction must exceed reef breakdown. Prior research has largely focused on the negative impacts of ocean acidification on reef growth, but new research this week from scientists at the Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology, based at the University of Hawai'i - Mānoa, demonstrates that lower ocean pH also enhances reef breakdown: a double-whammy for coral reefs in a changing climate.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Science Foundation, Sigma-Xi, and University of Hawai'i Sea Grant College Program

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Boy moms more social in chimpanzees
Four decades of chimpanzee observations reveals the mothers of sons are 25 percent more social than the mothers of daughters, spending about two hours more per day with other chimpanzees than the girl moms did. Researchers from Duke and George Washington University believe mothers are giving young males the opportunity to observe males in social situations to help them develop the social skills they'll need to thrive in adult male competition.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Harris Steel Group, Windibrow Foundation, Carnegie Corporation, University of Minnesota, Duke University, National Geographic Society

Contact: Karl Leif Bates
karl.bates@duke.edu
919-681-8054
Duke University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
New NSF-funded platform takes science to the clouds
Researchers are working to store, manage, share and analyze their data on virtual computing machines hosted in a cloud-based environment.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Daniel Stolte
stolte@email.arizona.edu
520-626-4402
University of Arizona

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Geoscience
The living, breathing ocean
The ocean is a complex ecosystem. The ocean carbon cycle is governed by the relationship among carbon, nutrients and oxygen, and the ratio between certain elements is key to understanding ocean respiration.
National Science Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Contact: Julie Cohen
julie.cohen@ucsb.edu
805-893-7220
University of California - Santa Barbara

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Journal of Physical Chemistry B
Cell's skeleton is never still
Computer models developed at Rice University show how microtubules age. The models help explain the dynamic instability seen in microtubules, essential elements in cells' cytoskeletons.
Welch Foundation, National Science Foundation, and Center for Theoretical Biological Physics

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Photonics
Ultra-short X-ray pulses explore the nano world
Ultra-short and extremely strong X-ray flashes, as produced by free-electron lasers, are opening the door to a hitherto unknown world. Scientists are using these flashes to take 'snapshots' of the geometry of tiniest structures, for example the arrangement of atoms in molecules. To improve not only spatial but also temporal resolution further requires knowledge about the precise duration and intensity of the X-ray flashes. An international team of scientists has now tackled this challenge.
German Research Foundation, Bavaria California Technology Center International, Max Planck Research Schools, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Science Foundation Ireland, European Union

Contact: Andreas Battenberg
battenberg@zv.tum.de
49-892-891-0510
Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists do glass a solid -- with new theory on how it transitions from a liquid
How does glass transition from a liquid to its familiar solid state? How does this common material transport heat and sound? And what microscopic changes occur when a glass gains rigidity as it cools? A team of researchers at NYU's Center for Soft Matter Research offers a theoretical explanation for these processes.
National Science Foundation

Contact: James Devitt
james.devitt@nyu.edu
212-998-6808
New York University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Materials Research Society Conference
An inside job: UC-designed nanoparticles infiltrate, kill cancer cells from within
UC nanoparticle designs target and treat early stage cancer cells by killing those cells with heat, delivered from inside the cell itself. Normal cells are thus left unaffected by the treatment regimen.
National Science Foundation

Contact: M.B. Reilly
reillymb@ucmail.uc.edu
513-556-1824
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Wireless electronic implants stop staph, then dissolve
For the first time, researchers have demonstrated a resorbable electronic implant that eliminated bacterial infection in mice by delivering heat to infected tissue when triggered by a remote wireless signal. The silk and magnesium devices then harmlessly dissolved. This is an important step forward for future development of on-demand medical devices that can be turned on remotely to perform a therapeutic function, such as managing post-surgical infection, and then degrade in the body.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Kim Thurler
kim.thurler@tufts.edu
617-627-3175
Tufts University

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
Nature Biotechnology
New device could make large biological circuits practical
An innovation from MIT could allow many biological components to be connected to produce predictable effects.
Eni-MIT Energy Research Fellowship, National Science Foundation, US Army Research Office, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 24-Nov-2014
JAMA Internal Medicine
Ambulance risk
Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated by basic life support ambulances have higher survival rates and better neurological outcomes than patients treated by advanced life support ambulances.
National Science Foundation, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Angela Alberti
angela_alberti@hms.harvard.edu
617-432-3038
Harvard Medical School

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Journal of Royal Society Interface
How the hummingbird achieves its aerobatic feats
Although hummingbirds are much larger and stir up the air more violently as they move, the way that they fly is more closely related to flying insects than it is to other birds.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 21-Nov-2014
Applied Physics Letters
New terahertz device could strengthen security
We are all familiar with the security hassles that accompany air travel. Now a new type of security detection that uses terahertz radiation is looking to prove its promise. Northwestern University researchers have developed a room temperature, compact, tunable terahertz source that could lead to advances in homeland security and space exploration. Able to detect explosives, chemical agents and dangerous biological substances from safe distances, devices using terahertz waves could make public spaces more secure than ever.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Homeland Security, Naval Air Systems Command, NASA

Contact: Megan Fellman
fellman@northwestern.edu
847-491-3115
Northwestern University

Showing releases 626-650 out of 812.

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