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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 701-725 out of 825.

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Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
Best practices in communication for the animal world
Effective communication is not just about the signaler, according to the study, the receiver also needs to assess the signaler efficiently. For instance, one of the most effective strategies from the perspective of female birds is assessing groups of males called leks, where females can assess multiple males in a short period of time.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Annette Gallagher
a.gallagher1@umiami.edu
305-284-1121
University of Miami

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Connecticut River watershed study will assess impacts of extreme rain events
A team of Yale researchers will lead a five-year, $3 million study to determine whether an increase in extreme rain events is affecting the transport of dissolved organic matter through the Connecticut River watershed, a phenomenon they say could alter the chemical composition and water quality of the watershed and Long Island Sound. The grant is funded by the National Science Foundation's MacroSystems Biology program.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kevin Dennehy
kevin.dennehy@yale.edu
203-436-4842
Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Acta Biomaterialia
Mantis shrimp stronger than airplanes
Inspired by the fist-like club of a mantis shrimp, a team of researchers led by University of California, Riverside, in collaboration with University of Southern California and Purdue University, have developed a design structure for composite materials that is more impact resistant and tougher than the standard used in airplanes.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sean Nealon
sean.nealon@ucr.edu
951-827-1287
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computer Systems
Carnegie Mellon system lets iPad users explore data with their fingers
Spreadsheets may have been the original killer app for personal computers, but data tables don't play to the strengths of multi-touch devices such as tablets. So researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a visualization approach that allows people to explore complex data with their fingers. Called Kinetica, the proof-of-concept system for the Apple iPad converts tabular data, such as Excel spreadsheets, into colored spheres that respond to touch.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 22-Apr-2014
Biology Letters
Cougars' diverse diet helped them survive the Pleistocene mass extinction
Cougars may have survived the mass extinction that took place about 12,000 years ago because they were not particular about what they ate, unlike their more finicky cousins the saber-tooth cat and American lion who perished, according a new analysis of the microscopic wear marks on the teeth of fossil cougars, saber-tooth cats and American lions.
National Science Foundation

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Queuing theory helps physicist understand protein recycling
Will Mather tries to extend an understanding of waiting in line to how cells operate, especially as it relates to what the consequences could be of protein traffic jams inside cells.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Rosaire Bushey
busheyr@vt.edu
540-231-5035
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Science
'Upside-down planet' reveals new method for studying binary star systems
What looked at first like a sort of upside-down planet has instead revealed a new method for studying binary star systems, discovered by a University of Washington student astronomer.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Kelley
kellep@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Sleep
Penn researchers find link between sleep and immune function in fruit flies
When we get sick it feels natural to try to hasten our recovery by getting some extra shuteye. Researchers have found that this response has a definite purpose, in fruit flies: enhancing immune system response and recovery to infection.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Karen Kreeger
karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu
215-349-5658
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Today's Antarctic region once as hot as California, Florida
Parts of ancient Antarctica were as warm as today's California coast, and polar regions of the southern Pacific Ocean registered 21st-century Florida heat, according to scientists using a new way to measure past temperatures.
National Science Foundation, Statoil, European Research Council

Contact: Eric Gershon
eric.gershon@yale.edu
203-415-3108
Yale University

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Advanced Material Interfaces
Progress made in developing nanoscale electronics
Alexander Shestopalov, an assistant professor of chemical engineering at the University of Rochester, has figured out how to reliably control the current that flows through a circuit that is the width of a single molecule.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Iglinski
peter.iglinski@rochester.edu
585-273-4726
University of Rochester

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Taking the pulse of mountain formation in the Andes
Carmala Garzione, a professor of earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester, explains that the Altiplano plateau in the central Andes -- and most likely the entire mountain range -- was formed through a series of rapid growth spurts.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter Iglinski
peter.iglinski@rochester.edu
585-273-4726
University of Rochester

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Psychological Science
People selectively remember the details of atrocities that absolve in-group members
Conversations about wartime atrocities often omit certain details. According to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, these omissions can lead people to have different memories for the event depending on social group membership.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Anna Mikulak
amikulak@psychologicalscience.org
202-293-9300
Association for Psychological Science

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Ecology team improves understanding of valley-wide stream chemistry
Understanding the chemistry of streams at a finer scale could help to identify factors impairing water quality and help protect aquatic ecosystems.
National Science Foundation, A.W. Mellon Foundation

Contact: Kevin McGuire
kevin.mcguire@vt.edu
540-231-6017
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 21-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists successfully use krypton to accurately date ancient Antarctic ice
A team of scientists has successfully identified the age of 120,000-year-old Antarctic ice using radiometric krypton dating -- a new technique that may allow them to locate and date ice that is more than a million years old. This will allow them to reconstruct the climate much farther back into Earth's history and potentially understand the mechanisms that have triggered the planet to shift into and out of ice ages.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Christo Buizert
buizertc@science.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1209
Oregon State University

Public Release: 20-Apr-2014
Nature Biotechnology
Computational method dramatically speeds up estimates of gene expression
With gene expression analysis growing in importance for both basic researchers and medical practitioners, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Maryland have developed a new computational method that dramatically speeds up estimates of gene activity from RNA sequencing data.
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Byron Spice
bspice@cs.cmu.edu
412-268-9068
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
More questions than answers as mystery of domestication deepens
A recent interdisciplinary conference that led to the publication of a special issue of PNAS on domestication raised more questions than it answered. Washington University in St. Louis scientists Fiona Marshall and Ken Olsen, who participated in the conference and contributed to the special issue, discuss some of the key questions that have been raised about this pivotal event in human history.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 18-Apr-2014
Nature Nanotechnology
'Exotic' material is like a switch when super thin
Researchers from Cornell University and Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown how to switch a particular transition metal oxide, a lanthanum nickelate, from a metal to an insulator by making the material less than a nanometer thick.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Office of Naval Research

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Chickens to chili peppers
Suddenly there was a word for chili peppers. Information about archaeological remains of ancient chili peppers in Mexico along with a study of the appearance of words for chili peppers in ancient dialects helped researchers to understand where jalapenos were domesticated. Special issue of PNAS on plant and animal domestication.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Beth King
kingb@si.edu
202-633-4700 x28216
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
American Journal of Public Health
Study recalculates costs of combination vaccines
One of the most popular vaccine brands for children may not be the most cost-effective choice. And doctors may be overlooking some cost factors when choosing vaccines, driving the market toward what is actually a more expensive option, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Advanced Materials
Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur
A new chemical process can transform waste sulfur into lightweight plastic lenses that have a high refractive index and are transparent to mid-range infrared light. The lenses may have applications in thermal imaging devices. Other potential applications for the new plastic include sulfur-lithium batteries.
American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Foundation, National Science Foundation, National Research Foundation of Korea, Korean Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, State of Arizona TRIF Funding, US Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Mari N. Jensen
mnjensen@email.arizona.edu
520-626-9635
University of Arizona

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Drought and fire in the Amazon lead to sharp increases in forest tree mortality
Ongoing deforestation and fragmentation of forests in the Amazon help create tinderbox conditions for wildfires in remnant forests, contributing to rapid and widespread forest loss during drought years, according to a team of researchers.
National Science Foundation, NASA, Packard Foundation, Max Planck Institute of Biogeochemistry

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
PLOS ONE
East African honeybees are safe from invasive pests… for now
Several parasites and pathogens that devastate honeybees in Europe, Asia and the United States are spreading across East Africa, but do not appear to be impacting native honeybee populations at this time, according to an international team of researchers.
US Department of Agriculture, National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
The story of animal domestication retold
A review of recent research on the domestication of large herbivores for 'The Modern View of Domestication,' a special feature of PNAS, suggests that neither intentional breeding nor genetic isolation were as significant as traditionally thought.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Genetic study tackles mystery of slow plant domestications
Did domesticating a plant typically take a few hundred or many thousands of years? Genetic studies often indicate that domestication traits have a fairly simple genetic basis, which should facilitate their rapid evolution under selection. On the other hand, recent archeological studies of crop domestication have suggested a relatively slow spread and fixation of domestication traits. An article in 'The Modern View of Domestication,' a special issue of PNAS, tries to resolve the discrepancy.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Lutz
dlutz@wustl.edu
314-935-5272
Washington University in St. Louis

Public Release: 17-Apr-2014
Science
Science: There's something ancient in the icebox
Scientists were greatly surprised to discover an ancient tundra landscape preserved under the Greenland Ice Sheet, below two miles of ice. This finding, led by geologists at the University of Vermont, provides strong evidence that the ice sheet has persisted much longer than previously known, enduring through many past periods of global warming.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Joshua Brown
joshua.e.brown@uvm.edu
802-656-3039
University of Vermont

Showing releases 701-725 out of 825.

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