National Science Foundation
Search NSF News:
NSF Main
NSF News
NSF Funded Research News
 
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 
At nsf.gov
Contacts Page
Multimedia Gallery
Media Advisories
Publications
Special Reports
Awards Search
Science & Engineering Stats
NSF & Congress
About NSF
RSS Feed RSS Feed
Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 701-725 out of 840.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 ]

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Nature
Design of self-assembling protein nanomachines starts to click
Biological systems produce an incredible array of self-assembling protein tools on a nanoscale, such as molecular motors, delivery capsules and injection devices. Inspired by sophisticated molecular machines naturally found in living things, scientists want to build their own with forms and functions customized to tackle modern day challenges. A new computational method, proven to accurately design protein nanomaterials that arrange themselves into a symmetrical, cage-like structure, may be an important step toward that goal.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, National Science Foundation, US Airforce, Department of Energy

Contact: Leila Gray
leilag@uw.edu
206-685-0381
University of Washington

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
MobiSys '14
Are squiggly lines the future of password security?
As more people use smart phones and tablets to store personal information and perform financial transactions, the need for robust password security is more critical than ever. A new Rutgers study shows that free-form gestures -- sweeping fingers in shapes across the screen -- can be used to unlock phones and grant access to apps. These gestures are less likely to be observed and reproduced by 'shoulder surfers' who spy on users to gain unauthorized access.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Diane Reed
diane.reed@rutgers.edu
848-445-7359
Rutgers University

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Testing the waters to fight infections like fish
A novel technology developed at Worcester Polytechnic Institute to block human infections by taking a lesson from fish has landed a $50,000 grant from the National Science Foundation's Innovation Corps program. The WPI team is engineering surfaces with molecules called antimicrobial peptides, several of which have been extracted from fish gills where they serve as the first line of defense against waterborne bacteria and other pathogens.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Michael Cohen
mcohen@wpi.edu
508-868-4778
Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Team packs butterfly nets for summer research expedition
A project funded by the National Science Foundation highlights UC's undergraduate research on a global scale.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dawn Fuller
dawn.fuller@uc.edu
513-556-1823
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
How red tide knocks out its competition
New research reveals how the algae behind red tide thoroughly disables -- but doesn't kill -- other species of algae. The study shows how chemical signaling between algae can trigger big changes in the marine ecosystem.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Brett Israel
brett.israel@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-1933
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
Nature Communications
WSU researchers confirm 60-year-old prediction of atomic behavior
Researchers at Washington State University have used a super-cold cloud of atoms that behaves like a single atom to see a phenomenon predicted 60 years ago and witnessed only once since.
National Science Foundation, Army Research Office, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

Contact: Peter Engels
engels@wsu.edu
509-335-4674
Washington State University

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
PLOS ONE
You catch (and kill) more flies with this sweetener
In a study that began as a sixth-grade science fair project, researchers at Drexel University have found that a popular non-nutritive sweetener may be an effective and human-safe insecticide. Erythritol, the main component of the sweetener Truvia, was toxic to fruit flies in a dose-dependent manner in the study, published in PLOS ONE. Flies consumed erythritol when sugar was available and even seemed to prefer it. No other sweeteners tested had these toxic effects.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Rachel Ewing
raewing@drexel.edu
215-895-2614
Drexel University

Public Release: 4-Jun-2014
ASIACCS 2014
New proactive approach unveiled to malware in networked computers and data
Computer scientists at Virginia Tech have developed a unique anomaly protection security approach for the detection of malicious activities on networked computers. The work was performed using a National Science Foundation CAREER award and is being presented at an international conference in Tokyo, Japan.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lynn Nystrom
tansy@vt.edu
540-231-4371
Virginia Tech

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
224th AAS Meeting
Astrophysical Journal
Discovering a hidden source of solar surges
Cutting-edge observations with the 1.6-meter telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory in California have taken research into the structure and activity of the Sun to new levels of understanding. Operated by New Jersey Institute of Technology, the telescope at Big Bear is the most powerful ground-based instrument dedicated to studying the sun.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, NASA, National Science Foundation, New Jersey Institute of Technology

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
224th AAS Meeting
Solving sunspot mysteries
Multi-wavelength observations of sunspots with the 1.6-meter telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory in California and aboard NASA's IRIS spacecraft have produced new and intriguing images of high-speed plasma flows and eruptions extending from the sun's surface to the outermost layer of the solar atmosphere, the corona.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, NASA, National Science Foundation, New Jersey Institute of Technology

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
224th AAS Meeting
Astrophysical Journal Letters
Investigating unusual three-ribbon solar flares with extreme high resolution
The 1.6 meter telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) in California has given researchers unparalleled capability for investigating phenomena such as solar flares. Operated by New Jersey Institute of Technology, the BBSO instrument is the most powerful ground-based telescope dedicated to studying the star closest to Earth.
NASA, National Science Foundation

Contact: Tanya Klein
973-596-3433
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Nanophotonics
Progress on detecting glucose levels in saliva
Researchers from Brown University have developed a new biochip sensor that uses dye chemistry and plasmonic interferometry to selectively measure concentrations of glucose in a complex solution similar to human saliva. The advance is an important step toward a device that would enable people with diabetes to test their glucose levels without drawing blood.
National Science Foundation, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

Contact: Kevin Stacey
kevin_stacey@brown.edu
401-863-3766
Brown University

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
PARTNERS works to promote tropical forest regrowth
University of Connecticut researchers lead multi-disciplinary lineup representing 14 countries at launch of international reforestation project.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sheila Foran
sheila.foran@uconn.edu
860-486-5385
University of Connecticut

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
Limnology & Oceanography
UGA ecologists provide close-up of coral bleaching event
New research by University of Georgia ecologists sheds light on exactly what happens to coral during periods of excessively high water temperatures. Their study, published in the journal Limnology and Oceanography, documents a coral bleaching event in the Caribbean in minute detail and sheds light on how it changed a coral's community of algae -- a change that could have long-term consequences for coral health, as bleaching is predicted to occur more frequently in the future.
National Science Foundation, World Bank

Contact: Dustin Kemp
dkemp1@uga.edu
University of Georgia

Public Release: 3-Jun-2014
223rd AAS Meeting
Image release: A violent, complex scene of colliding galaxy clusters
Using the Very Large Array along with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers see a fascinating, complex scene where clusters of galaxies are violently colliding.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Dave Finley
dfinley@nrao.edu
575-835-7302
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
A new look at old forests
As forests age, their ability to grow decreases, because energy production (photosynthesis) and energy consumption (respiration) decrease with age, a new study by Marine Biological Laboratory scientists and colleagues has determined. Since most US forests are maturing from regeneration that began about 100 years ago when extensive clear-cutting occurred, the study suggests the future growth of US forests will decline.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Diana Kenney
dkenney@mbl.edu
508-289-7139
Marine Biological Laboratory

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Paleoceanography
Modern ocean acidification is outpacing ancient upheaval, study suggests
In a new study published in the latest issue of Paleoceanography, scientists estimate that surface ocean acidity increased by about 100 percent during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in a few thousand years or more, and stayed that way for the next 70,000 years.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kim Martineau
kmartine@ldeo.columbia.edu
646-717-0134
The Earth Institute at Columbia University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Nature Climate Change
Decomposing logs show local factors undervalued in climate change predictions
In a long-term analysis conducted across several sites in the eastern US, a team of researchers found that local factors -- from levels of fungal colonization to the specific physical locations of the wood -- play a far greater role than climate in wood decomposition rates and the subsequent impacts on regional carbon cycling. Because decomposition of organic matter strongly influences the storage of carbon, or its release into the atmosphere, it is a major factor in potential changes to the climate.
National Science Foundation, Yale Climate & Energy Institute

Contact: Kevin Dennehy
kevin.dennehy@yale.edu
203-436-4842
Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Solving the puzzle of ice age climates
Researchers look to the Southern Ocean for an explanation of the 'Last Glacial Maximum.'
National Science Foundation

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Rensselaer researchers predict the electrical response of metals to extreme pressures
Research published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences makes it possible to predict how subjecting metals to severe pressure can lower their electrical resistance, a finding that could have applications in computer chips and other materials that could benefit from specific electrical resistance.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Mary Martialay
martim12@rpi.edu
518-276-2146
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Wayne State University licenses technology to new start-up, Detroit Materials, Inc.
The Office of the Vice President for Research at Wayne State University announced today the finalization of a license agreement with a new start-up company, Detroit Materials, Inc., for a Wayne State University patented portfolio of high-strength low-alloy steels and cast irons for demanding applications in the defense, off-highway, tooling and automotive industries.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Julie O'Connor
julie.oconnor@wayne.edu
313-577-8845
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
BMC Plant Biology
Blunting rice disease
A naturally occurring microbe in soil that inhibits the rice blast fungus has been identified by a team of researchers from the University of Delaware and the University of California at Davis.
NSF/Plant Genome Research Project

Contact: Donna O'Brien
dobrien@udel.edu
302-831-1418
University of Delaware

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Personality and Individual Differences
What finding out a child's sex before birth says about a mother
An expectant mother who chooses to find out her child's sex before birth may be giving subtle clues about her views on proper gender roles, new research suggests.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Contact: Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan
Schoppe-sullivan.1@osu.edu
Ohio State University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
Cell Biology Education—Life Sciences Education
ASU researcher leads national effort to transform undergraduate biology education
In an effort to both capture the diversity of biology and condense what is taught, an Arizona State University researcher is leading a grassroots effort to improve biology education throughout the United States. Sara Brownell and colleagues from UW have developed a detailed core concept template called BioCore Guide. The guide is provides an updated blueprint for educators to help them clarify the learning outcomes for undergraduate students majoring in general biology.
University of Washington, National Science Foundation

Contact: Sandra Leander
sandra.leander@asu.edu
480-965-9865
Arizona State University

Public Release: 2-Jun-2014
BioScience
Rolling old river is indeed changing
A team of ecologists has documented and summarized far-reaching changes in the Hudson since 1987, most as a result of human activity. Invasive species, pollution reductions, increased flow, and higher temperatures are among the most pronounced causes, but other changes are mysterious. Rivers must be understood over a decadal timescale, the researchers argue.
Hudson River Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jennifer Williams
jwilliams@aibs.org
American Institute of Biological Sciences

Showing releases 701-725 out of 840.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 ]

  Highlights
Science360 Science360 News Service
Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Science360 News is an up-to-date view of breaking science news from around the world. We gather news from wherever science is happening, including directly from scientists, college and university press offices, popular and peer-reviewed journals, dozens of National Science Foundation science and engineering centers, and funding sources that include government agencies, not-for-profit organizations and private industry.
Charles Darwin Science for Everyone
Let NSF be your portal to the latest science and engineering news—in videos, images, podcasts, articles, features and more.
NAGC Winner - Jellyfish NSF Exclusive Special Reports
From the "Birth of the Internet" to "Jellyfish Gone Wild", these in-depth, Web-based reports explore the frontiers of science and engineering.