National Science Foundation
Search NSF News:
NSF Main
NSF News
NSF Funded Research News
 
News by Research Area
Arctic & Antarctic
Astronomy & Space
Biology
Chemistry & Materials
Computing
Earth & Environment
Education
Engineering
Mathematics
Nanoscience
People & Society
Physics
 
At nsf.gov
Contacts Page
Multimedia Gallery
Media Advisories
Publications
Special Reports
Awards Search
Science & Engineering Stats
NSF & Congress
About NSF
RSS Feed RSS Feed
Back to EurekAlert! A Service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 726-750 out of 845.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 ]

Public Release: 19-May-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Brain steroids make good dads
Insights from a highly social fish can help understand how other androgenic steroids, like testosterone, can shape a male's parenting skills, according to a recent Georgia State University research study.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, National Science Foundation, Georgia State University

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 19-May-2014
Nature Photonics
New 'T-ray' tech converts light to sound for weapons detection, medical imaging
A device that essentially listens for light waves could help open up the last frontier of the electromagnetic spectrum -- the terahertz range.
National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Contact: Nicole Casal Moore
ncmoore@umich.edu
734-647-7087
University of Michigan

Public Release: 19-May-2014
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Having and raising offspring is costly phase of life for baboon moms
Observations made in Kenya as part of one of the world's longest-running studies of a wild primate show how having offspring influences the health of female baboons. These observations highlight that females are mostly injured on days when they are likely to conceive. In addition, injuries heal the slowest when they are suckling their young. The study is published in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology.
National Science Foundation, NIH/National Institute of Aging

Contact: Joan Robinson
joan.robinson@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Public Release: 19-May-2014
Nano Letters
Liberating devices from their power cords
A new type of supercapacitor that can hold a charge when it takes a lickin' has been developed by engineers at Vanderbilt University. It is the first 'multi-functional' energy storage device that can operate while subject to realistic static and dynamic loads -- advancing the day when everything from cell phones to electric vehicles will no longer need separate batteries.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: David Salisbury
david.salisbury@vanderbilt.edu
615-343-6803
Vanderbilt University

Public Release: 19-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Scientists develop new approach for sampling gut bacteria
Scientists at Forsyth, Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard School of Public Health have developed a new protocol for collecting saliva and stool samples for genomic and transcriptomic analyses. This method eliminates the need for specialized personnel and facilities while keeping the sample intact. It also provides critical insight into the genetic makeup of the microbiome of the digestive tract and the bacteria associated with celiac disease, oral cancer, perodontitis and obesity.
National Institutes of Health, NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Science Foundation

Contact: Jennifer Kelly
jkelly@forsyth.org
617-892-8602
Forsyth Institute

Public Release: 19-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Climate change, forest fires drove widespread surface melting of Greenland ice sheet
Rising temperatures and ash from Northern Hemisphere forest fires combined to cause large-scale surface melting of the Greenland ice sheet in 1889 and 2012, contradicting conventional thinking that the melt events were driven by warming alone, a Dartmouth College-led study finds.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: John Cramer
John.Cramer@Dartmouth.edu
603-646-9130
Dartmouth College

Public Release: 18-May-2014
Nature Methods
Illuminating neuron activity in 3-D
Researchers at MIT and the University of Vienna have created an imaging system that reveals neural activity throughout the brains of living animals.
Allen Institute for Brain Science, National Institutes of Health, MIT Synthetic Intelligence Project, IET Harvey Prize, National Science Foundation, New York Stem Cell Foundation, Google, and others

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-May-2014
Nature Geoscience
Cutoff switch may limit spread, duration of oxygen minimum zones
A new study examining the impact of iron released from continental margin sediments has documented a natural limiting switch that may keep these ocean systems from developing a runaway feedback loop that could lead to unchecked hypoxic areas, or persistent 'dead zones.'
National Science Foundation

Contact: Florian Scholz
fscholz@coas.oregonstate.edu
541-737-1429
Oregon State University

Public Release: 16-May-2014
PLOS ONE
Watching HIV bud from cells
University of Utah researchers devised a way to watch newly forming AIDS virus particles emerging or 'budding' from infected human cells without interfering with the process. The method shows a protein named ALIX gets involved during the final stages of virus replication, not earlier, as was believed previously.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Lee J. Siegel
lee.siegel@utah.edu
801-244-5399
University of Utah

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Geological Society of America Bulletin
On the shoulder of a giant: Precursor volcano to the island of O'ahu discovered
Researchers recently discovered that O'ahu, Hawai'i, actually consists of three major Hawaiian shield volcanoes, not two, as previously thought. Extending almost 100 km WNW from the western tip of the island of O'ahu is the submarine Ka'ena Ridge, a region that has now been recognized to represent a precursor volcano to the island of O'ahu, and on whose flanks the Wai'anae and Ko'olau Volcanoes later formed.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Marcie Grabowski
mworkman@hawaii.edu
808-956-3151
University of Hawaii ‑ SOEST

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Science
Tricking the uncertainty principle
Today, we can measure the position of an object with unprecedented accuracy, but the uncertainty principle places fundamental limits on our ability to measure. Noise that results from of the quantum nature of the fields used to make measurements imposes what is called the 'standard quantum limit.' This background noise keeps us from knowing an object's exact location, but a recent study provides a solution for rerouting some of that noise away from the measurement.
Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, National Science Foundation

Contact: Brian Bell
bpbell@caltech.edu
626-395-5832
California Institute of Technology

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Psychology of Women Quarterly
Land and power: Women discover one can lead to the other
UC Santa Cruz assistant professor of psychology Shelly Grabe finds that when women in developing countries own land, they gain power within their relationships and are less likely to experience violence.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Guy Lasnier
lasnier@ucsc.edu
831-459-2955
University of California - Santa Cruz

Public Release: 15-May-2014
EGU 2014 General Assembly
Nature
Research finds human impact may cause Sierra Nevada to rise, increase seismicity of San Andreas Fault
Research finds human impact may cause Sierra Nevada mountains to rise and to increase seismicity of San Andreas Fault in California. University of Nevada, Reno researchers presented their findings at the European Geophysical Sciences Union conference in Vienna, Austria.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Mike Wolterbeek
mwolterbeek@unr.edu
University of Nevada, Reno

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Science
Researchers show emissions from forests influence very first stage of cloud formation
Clouds are the largest source of uncertainty in present climate models. Much of the uncertainty surrounding clouds' effect on climate stems from the complexity of cloud formation. New research from scientists at the CLOUD experiment at CERN, including Carnegie Mellon's Neil Donahue, sheds light on new particle formation -- the very first step of cloud formation. The findings, published in Science, closely match observations in the atmosphere and can help make climate prediction models more accurate.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jocelyn Duffy
jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu
412-268-9982
Carnegie Mellon University

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Psychological Science
Justifying wartime atrocities alters memories
Stories about wartime atrocities and torture methods, like waterboarding and beatings, often include justifications -- despite whether the rationale is legitimate. But do such justifications shape an entire people's memory? A study by Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School shows how those justifications actually creep into people's memories of war, excusing the actions of their side.
National Science Foundation

Contact: B. Rose Huber
brhuber@princeton.edu
609-258-0157
Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society B
The color of blood: Pigment helps stage symbiosis in squid
The relationship between the Hawaiian bobtail squid and the bacterium Vibrio fischeri is well chronicled, but writing in the current issue of the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, a group led by University of Wisconsin-Madison microbiologists Margaret McFall-Ngai, Edward Ruby and their colleagues adds a new wrinkle to the story.
Marie Curie Actions, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Margaret McFall-Ngai
mjmcfallngai@wisc.edu
608-262-2393
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Science
Dating and DNA show Paleoamerican-Native American connection
Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Japan, Beringia and even Europe have all been suggested origination points for the earliest humans to enter the Americas because of apparent differences in cranial form between today's Native-Americans and the earliest known Paleoamerican skeletons. Now an international team of researchers has identified a nearly complete Paleoamerican skeleton with Native-American DNA that dates close to the time that people first entered the New World.
National Geographic Society, AIAmerica, Waitt Institute, Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 15-May-2014
Science
West Antarctic Ice Sheet collapse is under way
Models using detailed topographic maps show that the collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet has begun. Fast-moving Thwaites Glacier, which acts as a linchpin on the rest of the ice sheet, will likely disappear in a matter of centuries.
National Science Foundation, NASA

Contact: Hannah Hickey
hickeyh@uw.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Advanced Materials
Nanowire bridging transistors open way to next-generation electronics
Combining atoms of semiconductor materials into nanowires and structures on top of silicon surfaces shows promise for a new generation of fast, robust electronic and photonic devices.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Scientific Reports
Strongly interacting electrons in wacky oxide synchronize to work like the brain
Current computing is based on binary logic -- zeroes and ones -- also called Boolean computing, but a new type of computing architecture stores information in the frequencies and phases of periodic signals and could work more like the human brain using a fraction of the energy necessary for today's computers, according to a team of engineers.
The Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Advance brings 'hyperbolic metamaterials' closer to reality
Researchers have taken a step toward practical applications for 'hyperbolic metamaterials,' ultra-thin crystalline films that could bring optical advances including powerful microscopes, quantum computers and high-performance solar cells.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation

Contact: Emil Venere
venere@purdue.edu
765-494-4709
Purdue University

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
@millennials wary of @twitter, #MSU study finds
A new study indicates young adults have a healthy mistrust of the information they read on Twitter.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Andy Henion
henion@msu.edu
517-355-3294
Michigan State University

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Nature
California mountains rise as groundwater depleted in state's Central Valley
The weight of water pumped from California's agricultural heartland, the Central Valley, over the past 150 years is enough to allow Earth's crust to rebound upward, raising surrounding mountain ranges, the Sierra Nevada and Coast Ranges, some six inches. Winter rains and summer pumping cause annual up and down movements that could affect earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault, which parallels the ranges.
National Science Foundation, Miller Institute

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Journal of Experimental Biology
Scientists investigate the role of the 'silent killer' inside deep-diving animals
Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and Sonoma State University have furthered science's understanding of carbon monoxide's natural characteristics and limitations by studying the gas in one of the world's best divers: the elephant seal.
Office of Naval Research, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Mario Aguilera
scrippsnews@ucsd.edu
858-534-3624
University of California - San Diego

Public Release: 14-May-2014
Nature Communications
Microchip-like technology allows single-cell analysis
Engineers have developed a system similar to random access memory chips that allows the fast, efficient control and separation of individual cells. Once scaled up, the technology promises to sort and store hundreds of thousands of cells in a matter of minutes, enabling biologists to study vast arrays of single cells.
National Research Foundation of Korea, National Science Foundation, Research Triangle Materials Research Science and Engineering Center

Contact: Ken Kingery
ken.kingery@duke.edu
919-660-8414
Duke University

Showing releases 726-750 out of 845.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 ]

  Highlights
Science360 Science360 News Service
Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Science360 News is an up-to-date view of breaking science news from around the world. We gather news from wherever science is happening, including directly from scientists, college and university press offices, popular and peer-reviewed journals, dozens of National Science Foundation science and engineering centers, and funding sources that include government agencies, not-for-profit organizations and private industry.
Charles Darwin Science for Everyone
Let NSF be your portal to the latest science and engineering news—in videos, images, podcasts, articles, features and more.
NAGC Winner - Jellyfish NSF Exclusive Special Reports
From the "Birth of the Internet" to "Jellyfish Gone Wild", these in-depth, Web-based reports explore the frontiers of science and engineering.