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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Funded News

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 776-800 out of 919.

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Public Release: 28-Mar-2016
Nature Chemical Biology
Stanford scientists resurrect an abandoned drug, find it effective against human viruses
Stanford scientists have resurrected a discarded drug that helps human cells in a lab dish fight off two different viruses. Based on what they learned about how the drug works, it might also help fight the viruses that cause Ebola, dengue and Zika, among others.
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Burt and Deedee McMurtry Stanford Graduate Fellowship, National Institutes of Health, Director's New Innovator Award Program, Stanford ChEM-H

Contact: Amy Adams
amyadams@stanford.edu
650-796-3695
Stanford University

Public Release: 28-Mar-2016
Journal of Climate
Climate change: Greenland melting tied to shrinking Arctic sea ice
Vanishing Arctic sea ice. Dogged weather systems over Greenland. Far-flung surface ice melting on the massive island. These dramatic trends and global sea-level rise are linked, according to a study coauthored by Jennifer Francis, a research professor in Rutgers University's Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA, National Science Foundation, National Science Foundation of China

Contact: Todd B. Bates
tbates@ucm.rutgers.edu
848-932-0550
Rutgers University

Public Release: 25-Mar-2016
ACS Sensors
Sniffing out a dangerous vapor
University of Utah engineers have developed a new type of fiber material for a handheld scanner that can detect small traces of alkane fuel vapor, a valuable advancement that could be an early-warning signal for leaks in an oil pipeline, an airliner, or for locating a terrorist's explosive.
Department of Homeland Security, National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Contact: Vince Horiuchi
vincent.horiuchi@utah.edu
801-585-7499
University of Utah

Public Release: 25-Mar-2016
Science Advances
Ancient bones point to shifting grassland species as climate changes
More rainfall during the growing season may have led to one of the most significant changes in the Earth's vegetation in the distant past, and similar climate changes could affect the distribution of plants in the future as well, a new study suggests.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Nick Houtman
nick.houtman@oregonstate.edu
541-737-0783
Oregon State University

Public Release: 25-Mar-2016
Science Advances
New class of molecular 'lightbulbs' illuminate MRI
Duke scientists have discovered a new class of molecular tags that enhance MRI signals by 10,000-fold and generate detectable signals that last over an hour. The tags are biocompatible and inexpensive to produce, paving the way for widespread use of MRI to monitor the metabolic processes of conditions like cancer and heart disease in real time.
NSF, NIH, Department of Defense Congressionally Directed MedicalResearch Programs Breast Cancer, Pratt School of Engineering Research Innovation Seed Fund, Burroughs Wellcome Fellowship, Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund

Contact: Kara Manke
kara.manke@duke.edu
919-681-8064
Duke University

Public Release: 24-Mar-2016
Geophysical Research Letters
GOES-R satellite could provide better data for hurricane prediction
The launch of the GOES-R geostationary satellite in Oct. 2016 could herald a new era for predicting hurricanes, according to Penn State researchers. The wealth of information from this new satellite, at time and space scales not previously possible, combined with advanced statistical hurricane prediction models, could enable more accurate predictions in the future.
National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, NASA, Funai Foundation for Information Technology

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 24-Mar-2016
Trends in Biotechnology
ASU researcher improves crop performance with new biotechnology
Researchers with Arizona State University's School of Life Sciences have discovered a way to enhance a plant's tolerance to stress, which in turn improves how it uses water and nutrients from the soil. These improvements increase plant biomass and yield. This discovery could be instrumental in agriculture and food security by improving crop sustainability and performance.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sandra Leander
sandra.leander@asu.edu
480-965-9865
Arizona State University

Public Release: 24-Mar-2016
Nature
Graphene nanoribbons: It's all about the edges
As reported by the journal Nature in its latest issue, researchers from Empa, the Max Planck Institute in Mainz and the Technical University of Dresden have for the first time succeeded in producing graphene nanoribbons with perfect zigzag edges from molecules. Electrons on these zigzag edges exhibit different (and coupled) rotational directions ('spin'). This could make graphene nanoribbons the material of choice for electronics of the future, so-called spintronics.
Swiss National Science Foundation, European Research Council, US Office of Naval Research

Contact: Martina Peter
redaktion@empa.ch
41-587-654-987
Technische Universitšt Dresden

Public Release: 24-Mar-2016
PLOS Pathogens
Damage-signalling protein shows parallels between plant and human immune systems
Professor Daniel Klessig and colleagues at the Boyce Thompson Institute have identified a novel 'DAMP' molecule in plants that triggers an immune response after tissue damage. Knowledge of this protein and its human equivalent give us a cross-kingdom understanding of how humans and plants fight off infections.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Patricia Waldron
pjw85@cornell.edu
607-254-7476
Boyce Thompson Institute

Public Release: 24-Mar-2016
Scientific Reports
Newly discovered organic nanowires leave manmade technologies in their dust
A microbial protein fiber discovered by a Michigan State University scientist transports charges at rates high enough to be applied in manmade nanotechnologies. The discovery, featured in the current issue of Scientific Reports, describes the high-speed protein fiber produced by uranium-reducing Geobacter bacteria. The fibers are hair-like protein filaments called 'pili' that have the unique property of transporting charges at speeds of 1 billion electrons per second.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Layne Cameron
layne.cameron@cabs.msu.edu
517-353-8819
Michigan State University

Public Release: 24-Mar-2016
Nature
Graphene nanoribbons: It's all about the edges
As reported by the journal Nature in its latest issue, researchers from Empa, the Max Planck Institute in Mainz and the Technical University of Dresden have for the first time succeeded in producing graphene nanoribbons with perfect zigzag edges from molecules. Electrons on these zigzag edges exhibit different (and coupled) rotational directions ('spin'). This could make graphene nanoribbons the material of choice for electronics of the future, so-called spintronics.
Swiss National Science Foundation, European Research Council, US Office of Naval Research

Contact: Dr. Roman Fasel
roman.fasel@empa.ch
41-587-654-348
Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)

Public Release: 23-Mar-2016
Cognitive Science
In human development research, big data could mean better results
While there is no Hubble telescope gathering data about the universe of human development, projects to make large amounts of information -- big data -- more accessible to developmental researchers could bring behavioral science's biggest questions into focus, according to a Penn State psychologist.
National Science Foundation, NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Society for Research in Child Development

Contact: Matt Swayne
mls29@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 23-Mar-2016
Chemical Science
New reaction turns feedstock chemical into versatile, chiral building block
Researchers in the Doyle lab at Princeton have developed a direct cross-coupling reaction to produce versatile building blocks that are highly useful in pharmaceutical research from the feedstock chemical pyridine.
NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Science Foundation

Contact: Tien Nguyen
tienn@princeton.edu
609-258-6523
Princeton University

Public Release: 23-Mar-2016
Nature Communications
Microfluidic devices gently rotate small organisms and cells
A method to rotate single particles, cells or organisms using acoustic waves in a microfluidic device will allow researchers to take three dimensional images with only a cell phone.
National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Center for Nanoscale Science

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 23-Mar-2016
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
New research shows quasars slowed star formation
Research led by Johns Hopkins University scientists has found new persuasive evidence that could help solve a longstanding mystery in astrophysics: why did the pace of star formation in the universe slow down some 11 billion years ago?
National Science Foundation

Contact: Arthur Hirsch
ahirsch6@jhu.edu
443-997-9909
Johns Hopkins University

Public Release: 23-Mar-2016
Environmental Science & Technology
Protecting coral reefs with bubbles
Bubbles -- yes, bubbles -- could help protect coral reefs, oyster farms, and other coastal ecosystems from increasing ocean acidification, according to new research by Stanford scientists.
National Science Foundation, McGee research grant from the Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Contact: Ker Than
kerthan@stanford.edu
650-723-9820
Stanford's School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Public Release: 23-Mar-2016
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
A new way to determine the age of stars?
Researchers have developed a new conceptual framework for understanding how stars similar to our Sun evolve. Their framework helps explain how the rotation of stars, their emission of x-rays, and the intensity of their stellar winds vary with time. According to first author Eric Blackman, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Rochester, the work could also 'ultimately help to determine the age of stars more precisely than is currently possible.'
National Science Foundation, Simons Foundation, NASA, IBM

Contact: Leonor Sierra
lsierra@ur.rochester.edu
585-276-6264
University of Rochester

Public Release: 22-Mar-2016
Nature Communications
DNA molecules directly interact with each other based on sequence, study finds
Proteins play a large role in DNA regulation, but a new study finds that DNA molecules directly interact with one another in a way that's dependent on the sequence of the DNA and epigenetic factors. This could have implications for how DNA is organized in the cell and even how genes are regulated in different cell types, the researchers say.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Liz Ahlberg
eahlberg@illinois.edu
217-244-1073
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Public Release: 22-Mar-2016
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
UMass Amherst astronomers report most 'outrageously' luminous galaxies ever observed
Astronomers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report that they have observed the most luminous galaxies ever seen in the Universe, objects so bright that established descriptors such as 'ultra-' and 'hyper-luminous' used to describe previously brightest known galaxies don't even come close. Lead author and undergraduate Kevin Harrington says, 'We've taken to calling them 'outrageously luminous' among ourselves, because there is no scientific term to apply.'
National Science Foundation, UMass Amherst Commonwealth Honors College Research Fellowship and Honors Grants, William Bannick Student Travel Grant

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@admin.umass.edu
413-545-0444
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 22-Mar-2016
American Museum Novitates
Discovery of extinct bat doubles diversity of native Hawaiian land mammals
The Hawaiian Islands have long been thought to support just one endemic land mammal in the archipelago's brief geologic history, the Hawaiian hoary bat. But new fossil evidence indicates that a second, very different species of bat lived alongside the hoary bat for thousands of years before going extinct shortly after humans arrived on the islands. The research describes the mysterious bat, whose remains were first discovered in a lava tube more than 30 years ago.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Kendra Snyder
ksnyder@amnh.org
212-496-3419
American Museum of Natural History

Public Release: 22-Mar-2016
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
'Watchdog' for greenhouse gas emissions
Mistakes can happen when estimating emissions of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. Researchers from Empa, the University of Berne and ETH Zurich funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation have developed a method to independently validate national statistics.
Swiss National Science Foundation

Contact: Dr. Dominik Brunner
dominik.brunner@empa.ch
41-587-654-944
Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)

Public Release: 22-Mar-2016
eLife
Scientists reveal how animals find their way 'in the dark'
Scientists have revealed the brain activity in animals that helps them find food and other vital resources in unfamiliar environments where there are no cues, such as lights and sounds, to guide them.
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Marie Curie Fellowship, National Science Foundation (NSF)

Contact: Emily Packer
e.packer@elifesciences.org
eLife

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Record-breaking ultraviolet winds discovered near black hole
The fastest winds at ultraviolet wavelengths have been discovered near a supermassive black hole. The winds have speeds of more than 200 million miles an hour, equivalent to a category 77 hurricane. The research team's discovery of the fastest ultraviolet winds ever confirmed from a quasar -- the disk of hot gas that surrounds the black hole -- is published in the 21 March 2016 print issue of the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, National Science Foundation of the United States, Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey

Contact: Barbara K. Kennedy
science@psu.edu
814-863-4682
Penn State

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
RIT/NTID researchers receive $450,000 grant for longitudinal study of vision in deaf children
Matthew Dye and Peter Hauser of Rochester Institute of Technology's National Technical Institute for the Deaf received a National Science Foundation grant to study how hearing levels and early-language experience influence deaf children's vision.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Vienna McGrain
vnccom@rit.edu
585-475-4952
Rochester Institute of Technology

Public Release: 21-Mar-2016
Journal of Ethnobiology
Production of butter from shea trees in West Africa pushed back 1,000 years
University of Oregon anthropologists have pushed back the history of harvesting shea trees in West Africa by more than 1,000 years earlier than previously believed. Oil from the trees' nuts is used for cooking by local populations and exported for use such things as skin moisturizers and soap.
National Science Foundation, National Geographic Society

Contact: Jim Barlow
jebarlow@uoregon.edu
541-346-3481
University of Oregon

Showing releases 776-800 out of 919.

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