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  News From the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) — For more information about NSF and its programs, visit www.nsf.gov

NSF Press Releases

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 54.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 ]

Public Release: 28-Oct-2014
New and updated resource on STEM education, workforce
It just became a lot easier for educators, students, parents, policymakers and business leaders to learn more about national trends in education and jobs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Contact: Nadine Lymn
nlymn@nsf.gov
703-292-2490
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Spotlighting the sun
Astronomers with the National Science Foundation-funded National Optical Astronomy Observatory captured pictures not only of Thursday's partial solar eclipse, but also of the 'monster' sized active region or sun spot that has many comparing it to one of a similar size that occurred 11 years ago.

Contact: Ivy F. Kupec
ikupec@nsf.gov
703-292-8796
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Nature
From the mouths of ... young fireballs
That is the conclusion, published in the current issue of Nature, from a research collaboration led by Georgia State University Astronomer Gail Schaefer that includes 37 researchers (many who are National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded) from 17 institutions. The researchers observed the expanding thermonuclear fireball from a nova that erupted last year in the constellation Delphinus.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Ivy F. Kupec
ikupec@nsf.gov
703-292-8796
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 27-Oct-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Where did the Deepwater Horizon oil go? To Davy Jones' Locker at the bottom of the sea
Scientist David Valentine of the University of California, Santa Barbara and colleagues from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the University of California, Irvine, have discovered the path the oil followed to its resting place on the Gulf of Mexico sea floor.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
2014 Nobel laureates in chemistry and economics supported by the National Science Foundation
Two scientists whose work was supported by the National Science Foundation were among the 13 Nobel Prize winners announced earlier this month.

Contact: Bobbie Mixon
bmixon@nsf.gov
703-292-8070
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 20-Oct-2014
Environmental Science & Technology
New tracers can identify frac fluids in the environment
Scientists have developed new geochemical tracers that can identify hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids that have been spilled or released into the environment.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 15-Oct-2014
18 million workers produced more than one-fifth of US gross domestic product in 2012
In 2012, knowledge intensive services industries--business, finance and information -- produced $3.4 trillion in value-added output, more than one-fifth of the US gross domestic product, and employed 18 million workers. Data are from a new report released today by the National Science Foundation's National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics.

Contact: Bobbie Mixon
bmixon@nsf.gov
703-292-8485
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 9-Oct-2014
Earth to data: Making sense of environmental observations
As with the proverbial canary in the coal mine, birds serve as an indicator of the health of our environment. Many common species have experienced significant population declines within the last 40 years. Suggested causes include habitat loss and climate change, however to fully understand bird distribution relative to the environment, extensive data are needed.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Aaron Dubrow
adubrow@nsf.gov
703-292-4489
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 6-Oct-2014
President Obama honors nation's top scientists and innovators
President Obama today announced a new group of recipients of the National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation -- the nation's highest honors for achievement and leadership in advancing the fields of science and technology. The honorees will receive their medals at a White House ceremony later this year.

Contact: Aaron Dubrow
adubrow@nsf.gov
703-292-4489
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 2-Oct-2014
Science
New map uncovers thousands of unseen seamounts on ocean floor
Scientists have created a new map of the world's seafloor, offering a more vivid picture of the structures that make up the deepest, least-explored parts of the ocean.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 1-Oct-2014
Laying the groundwork for data-driven science
The ability to collect and analyze massive amounts of data is rapidly transforming science, industry and everyday life, but what we have seen so far is likely just the tip of the iceberg. Many of the benefits of 'Big Data' have yet to surface because of a lack of interoperability, missing tools and hardware that is still evolving to meet the diverse needs of scientific communities.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Aaron Dubrow
adubrow@nsf.gov
703-292-4489
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 30-Sep-2014
$18 million NSF investment aims to take flat materials to new heights
Graphene, a form of carbon in which a single layer of atoms forms a two-dimensional, honeycomb crystal lattice, conducts electricity and heat efficiently and interacts with light in unusual ways. These properties have led to worldwide efforts in exploring its use in electronics, photonics and many other applications.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah Bates
sabates@nsf.gov
703-292-7738
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Designing infrastructure with resilience from disruptions and disasters
When infrastructure is resilient, it is able to bounce back after a disruption at an acceptable cost and speed. When resilient infrastructure is interdependent, cascading failures between infrastructure systems may be eased or possibly even avoided.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Sarah Bates
sabates@nsf.gov
703-292-7738
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 29-Sep-2014
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society
Cause of California drought linked to climate change
The atmospheric conditions associated with the unprecedented drought in California are very likely linked to human-caused climate change, researchers report.

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Protecting our processors
The National Science Foundation and Semiconductor Research Corporation today announced nine research awards to 10 universities totaling nearly $4 million under a joint program focused on Secure, Trustworthy, Assured and Resilient Semiconductors and Systems.
National Science Foundation, Semiconductor Research Corporation

Contact: Aaron Dubrow
adubrow@nsf.gov
703-292-4489
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 23-Sep-2014
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Antifreeze proteins in Antarctic fish prevent both freezing and melting
Antarctic fish that manufacture their own 'antifreeze' proteins to survive in the icy Southern Ocean also suffer an unfortunate side effect, researchers funded by the National Science Foundation report: The protein-bound ice crystals that accumulate inside their bodies resist melting even when temperatures warm.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter West
pwest@nsf.gov
703-292-7530
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 15-Sep-2014
NSF awards $15 million in second set of coastal sustainability grants
More than half the world's human population lived in coastal areas in the year 2000; that number is expected to rise to 75 percent by 2025.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Unemployment for doctoral scientists and engineers below national average in 2013
A new National Science Foundation report says the 2013 unemployment rate for individuals with research doctoral degrees in science, engineering and health fields was one-third the rate for the general population aged 25 and older -- 2.1 percent versus 6.3 percent.

Contact: Bobbie Mixon
bmixon@nsf.gov
703-292-8485
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 12-Sep-2014
Science
How evolutionary principles could help save our world
The age of the Anthropocene -- the scientific name given to our current geologic age -- is dominated by human impacts on our environment. A warming climate. Increased resistance of pathogens and pests. A swelling population. Coping with these modern global challenges requires application of what one might call a more-ancient principle: evolution.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Jessica Arriens
jarriens@nsf.gov
703-292-2243
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 10-Sep-2014
Racing ahead of disease outbreaks: $12 million in new research grants
Ebola, Middle East Respiratory syndrome, malaria, antibiotic-resistant infections: Is our interaction with the environment somehow responsible for their increased incidence?
National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Ocean acidification: NSF awards $11.4 million in new grants to study effects on marine ecosystems
With increasing levels of carbon dioxide accumulating in the atmosphere and moving into marine ecosystems, the world's oceans are becoming more acidic.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 9-Sep-2014
Princeton University launches NSF-funded initiative to study Southern Ocean's role in global systems
Scientists from 11 institutions across the United States will meet this week at Princeton University to officially launch a $21 million, National Science Foundation-funded, interdisciplinary initiative to study the Southern Ocean, the sea that surrounds Antarctica.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Peter West
pwest@nsf.gov
703-292-7530
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Science
Scientists apply biomedical technique to reveal changes in body of the ocean
For decades, doctors have developed methods to diagnose how different types of cells and systems in the body are functioning. Now scientists have adapted an emerging biomedical technique to study the vast body of the ocean.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Cheryl Dybas
cdybas@nsf.gov
703-292-7734
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 8-Sep-2014
Cancer Research
Transformative science
A new public-private partnership between the National Science Foundation, National Cancer Institute, Stand Up To Cancer and The V Foundation for Cancer Research is committing $11.5 million towards transformational, theoretical biophysics that could have a significant impact on cancer research and treatment. SU2C is a program of the Entertainment Industry Foundation, a 501(c)(3) charitable organization that raises money for innovative cancer research.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Ivy F. Kupec
ikupec@nsf.gov
703-292-8796
National Science Foundation

Public Release: 4-Sep-2014
Scientific Reports
T. rex times 7: New dinosaur species is discovered in Argentina
Scientists have discovered and described a new supermassive dinosaur species with the most complete skeleton ever found of its type. At 85 feet long and weighing about 65 tons in life, Dreadnoughtus schrani is the largest land animal for which a body mass can be accurately calculated.
National Science Foundation

Contact: Maria C. Zacharias
mzachari@nsf.gov
703-292-8454
National Science Foundation

Showing releases 1-25 out of 54.

[ 1 | 2 | 3 ]

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Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Science360 News is an up-to-date view of breaking science news from around the world. We gather news from wherever science is happening, including directly from scientists, college and university press offices, popular and peer-reviewed journals, dozens of National Science Foundation science and engineering centers, and funding sources that include government agencies, not-for-profit organizations and private industry.
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From the "Birth of the Internet" to "Jellyfish Gone Wild", these in-depth, Web-based reports explore the frontiers of science and engineering.