[ Back to EurekAlert! ] Public release date: 8-May-2006
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Contact: John Matlock
jmatlock@perimeterinstitute.ca
519-569-7600 x6081
Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

12-Qubits reached in quantum information quest

In the drive to understand and harness quantum effects as they relate to information processing, scientists in Waterloo and Massachusetts have benchmarked quantum control methods on a 12-Qubit system. Their research was performed on the largest quantum information processor to date.

Theorists and experimentalists at the Institute for Quantum Computing and (IQC) and Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics (PI) in Waterloo, along with MIT, Cambridge, have presented an operational control method in quantum information processing extending up to 12 qubits. The team's research is available in Physical Review Letters (PRL 96, 170501 week ending 5 May, 2006) and describes the approaches, accuracy and scalability. Despite decoherence, the researchers reached a 12-coherence state and decoded it using liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processors.

Raymond Laflamme, Executive Director at the Institute for Quantum Computing and Long Term Researcher at Perimeter Institute says - "…our experiment shows a high level of quantum control over the largest quantum register to date. It is an important step in implementing quantum information processing on larger and larger devices. This is an important milestone towards harnessing the quantum world."

The team's findings set a new algorithmic benchmark in a global effort to exploit quantum properties in order to support entirely new modes of information processing – such as quantum computers with an ability to solve certain types of incredibly complex problems that no modern day computer can approach. The basic principles behind today's computers and other information processing devices (known as "classical" systems) were developed in the 1930s. However, today's theories governing the calculation, storage and transmission of information are at a crossroads. As wires and logic gates become ever smaller, quirky quantum phenomena in the tiny world of atoms take over and impede the efficient flow of information. Select groups of international theorists and experimentalists - including those who are clustering in Waterloo, Ontario - are trying to understand and harness the phenomena and, with this latest research, have set a new standard by controlling a 12-Qubit system.

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For additional details please contact:
Institute for Quantum Computing
Adele Newton, Director of Industry and Government Relations
anewton@iqc.ca
519 885-1211, ext 7210

Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
John Matlock, Director of Communications
jmatlock@perimeterinstitute.ca
1-519-569-7600 ext. 6081

About PI: Perimeter Institute is an independent, non-profit research centre where scientists push the limits of our understanding of physical laws and calculate new ideas about the very nature of space, time, matter and information. The Institute also provides a wide array of educational outreach activities for students, teachers and the general public to share the joy of scientific research and discovery. Details available online at www.perimeterinstitute.ca.

About IQC: The mission of the Institute is to advance fundamental experimental and theoretical knowledge in relevant areas of Engineering, Mathematics and Science to enhance the developments in the field of Quantum Computation and Information Processing. This is to be achieved by providing a unique facility and environment to bring together some of the best researchers and students in computing, engineering, mathematical and physical sciences at the University of Waterloo. IQC projects range from solid state micro-electrical and photonic devices, to liquid NMR experiments, and mathematical algorithms for communications and computational tasks. Details available online at www.iqc.ca.



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